Special Issue "Atomic-Scale Properties of Magnetic Surfaces, Interfaces, and Nanostructures"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Synthesis, Interfaces and Nanostructures".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Krisztián Palotás
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Guest Editor
Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Center for Physics, Budapest, Hungary; MTA-SZTE Reaction Kinetics and Surface Chemistry Research Group, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary
Interests: theoretical and computational magnetism; magnetic surfaces, interfaces, and nanostructures; topological magnetism and skyrmions; magnetic interactions; atomistic spin dynamics; electron charge and spin transport; scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy; 2D materials; new materials for various applications; supported molecular nanostructures; surface chemistry; density functional theory; developments of theoretical and computational methods
Dr. Balázs Újfalussy
Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Center for Physics, Budapest, Hungary
Interests: magnetism; magnetic interactions; magnetic surfaces and nanostructures; magnetic alloys; magnetic phase transitions; computational materials science; theoretical and computational magnetism; density functional theory; topology and magnetism; magnetic superconductors; Majorana zero modes
Prof. Dr. László Szunyogh
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Guest Editor
Department of Theoretical Physics and MTA-BME Condensed Matter Research Group, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Budapest, Hungary
Interests: theoretical and computational magnetism; density functional theory; developments of theoretical and computational methods; magnetic interactions; magnetic anisotropy; atomistic spin dynamics; bulk magnets; magnetic surfaces and nanostructures; superparamagnetism; skyrmionics; magnetism of 2D materials; electron charge and spin transport

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Magnetic surfaces, interfaces, and nanostructures are key elements for a wide spectrum of technological applications. Consequently, extensive research activities have been performed to explore the physical properties of these systems, including both fundamental and practical aspects.  A deep understanding of the physical mechanisms at the atomic scale, both from theoretical and experimental points of view, is a crucial step towards utilizing magnetic nanomaterials in devices with improved functionality and efficiency in order to realize commercially available products for future everyday life.

This Special Issue has the goal of collecting the latest original research contributions in the forms of short communications, articles, or comprehensive reviews on the atomic scale properties of magnetic surfaces, interfaces, and nanostructures. Our vision is to compile a high-impact Special Issue that will serve as an important reference for future research and development activities in this field. All considered papers should demonstrate clear links to atomic scale magnetic properties.

We kindly invite the reader to contribute to this Special Issue.

Dr. Krisztián Palotás
Dr. Balázs Újfalussy
Prof. Dr. László Szunyogh
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Atomic scale magnetic properties
  • Magnetic surfaces, interfaces, thin films, multilayers, and heterostructures
  • Magnetic nanostructures
  • Nanomagnetism
  • Topology and magnetism, topological spin textures
  • Magnetic interactions
  • Spin dynamics
  • Spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy
  • Spintronics, orbitronics, and skyrmionics
  • Magnetic materials for industrial applications

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Friedel Oscillations Induced by Magnetic Skyrmions: From Scattering Properties to All-Electrical Detection
Nanomaterials 2021, 11(1), 194; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano11010194 - 14 Jan 2021
Abstract
Magnetic skyrmions are spin swirling solitonic defects that can play a major role in information technology. Their future in applications and devices hinges on their efficient manipulation and detection. Here, we explore from ab-initio their nature as magnetic inhomongeities in an otherwise unperturbed [...] Read more.
Magnetic skyrmions are spin swirling solitonic defects that can play a major role in information technology. Their future in applications and devices hinges on their efficient manipulation and detection. Here, we explore from ab-initio their nature as magnetic inhomongeities in an otherwise unperturbed magnetic material, Fe layer covered by a thin Pd film and deposited on top of Ir(111) surface. The presence of skyrmions triggers scattering processes, from which Friedel oscillations emerge. The latter mediate interactions among skyrmions or between skyrmions and other potential surrounding defects. In contrast to their wavelengths, the amplitude of the oscillations depends strongly on the size of the skyrmion. The analogy with the scattering-off atomic defects enables the assignment of an effective scattering potential and a phase shift to the skyrmionic particles, which can be useful to predict their behavior on the basis of simple scattering frameworks. The induced charge ripples can be utilized for a noninvasive all-electrical detection of skyrmions located on a surface or even if buried a few nanometers away from the detecting electrode. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Manipulation of Molecular Spin State on Surfaces Studied by Scanning Tunneling Microscopy
Nanomaterials 2020, 10(12), 2393; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano10122393 - 30 Nov 2020
Abstract
The adsorbed magnetic molecules with tunable spin states have drawn wide attention for their immense potential in the emerging fields of molecular spintronics and quantum computing. One of the key issues toward their application is the efficient controlling of their spin state. This [...] Read more.
The adsorbed magnetic molecules with tunable spin states have drawn wide attention for their immense potential in the emerging fields of molecular spintronics and quantum computing. One of the key issues toward their application is the efficient controlling of their spin state. This review briefly summarizes the recent progress in the field of molecular spin state manipulation on surfaces. We focus on the molecular spins originated from the unpaired electrons of which the Kondo effect and spin excitation can be detected by scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM and STS). Studies of the molecular spin-carriers in three categories are overviewed, i.e., the ones solely composed of main group elements, the ones comprising 3d-metals, and the ones comprising 4f-metals. Several frequently used strategies for tuning molecular spin state are exemplified, including chemical reactions, reversible atomic/molecular chemisorption, and STM-tip manipulations. The summary of the successful case studies of molecular spin state manipulation may not only facilitate the fundamental understanding of molecular magnetism and spintronics but also inspire the design of the molecule-based spintronic devices and materials. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Emergence of Nontrivial Spin Textures in Frustrated van der Waals ferromagnets
Authors: AM Ukpong
Affiliation: School of Chemistry and Physics, College of Agriculture, Engineering and Science, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Pietermaritzburg, South Africa
Abstract: First principles//calculations of the ground state are combined with the dynamical evolution of a classical spin Hamiltonian to study the field dependence of magnetic properties in frustrated van der Waal magnets. Dynamically stabilized spin textures are obtained relative to the direction of spin quantization as stochastic solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert-Sloncweski equation under the flow of spin current. By explicitly considering the spin signatures that arise from geometrical frustrations at the interfaces, we analyze the emergence of skyrmion spin texture and characterize theirformation under competing internal fields. The computed magnetic coercivity and hysteresis curves are used to reveal a dynamic switch from soft to hard magnetic configuration in the skyrmion spin Hall regime. Our results show that heavy metal capped multilayer heterostructure stacks hostfield-tunable spiral skyrmions that could serveas unique channels for collective carrier transport in spintronic devices.

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