Special Issue "Silicon-Based Nanostructures: Fabrication and Characterization"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanoelectronics, Nanosensors and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2022 | Viewed by 2042

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Henry H. Radamson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100029, China
2. Guangdong Greater Bay Area Institute of Integrated Circuit and System, R&D Center of Optoelectronic Hybrid IC, Building A, No. 136 Kaiyuan Avenue, Development Zone, Guangzhou, China
3. Department of Electronics Design, Mid Sweden University, Holmgatan 10, 85170 Sundsvall, Sweden
Interests: nanomaterials; nanoelectronics; nanophotonics; device processing; defects; strain engineering; CMOS; characterization; epitaxy; device physics; photodetectors; lasers; modulators; infrared; waveguides
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Guilei Wang
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Beijing Superstring Academy of Memory Technology, Beijing 100176, China
2. Guangdong Greater Bay Area Institute of Integrated Circuit and System, R&D Center of Optoelectronic Hybrid IC, Building A, No. 136 Kaiyuan Avenue, Development Zone, Guangzhou, China
Interests: nanomaterials; semiconductor processing and device physics; memory devices; thin-film deposition and epitaxy; material characterization; microelectronics; heterostructures; strain engineering; atomic layer deposition
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Si-based nanostructures attracted widespread attention during recent years due to their low power consumption and fast operation in electronics and photonics, as well as high sensitivity in sensors applications. As an example, following Moore’s law, CMOSs have undergone an evolution in design and architecture in integrated circuits. The current technology developments drive the design of devices towards 3D integration, and as we approach the end of the era of Moore’s law, a greater number of nanostructures are fabricated for nanodevices. We also face an the emergence of electronics and photonics, where the fabrication and characterization of nanostructures are strongly required. These designs will be our ultimate goals in the field of nanotechnology in the future.  Therefore, this Special Issue focuses on the following scientific fields:

  • The fabrication and characterization of group IV nanostructures, nanodevices and nanosensors;
  • Carrier transport in nanostructures and nanomaterials;
  • Optoelectronic materials and nanodevices using Si-based heterostructures and nanostructures;
  • The integration of nanostructures in photonics and electronics;
  • Strain band-gap engineering in nanostructures;
  • The characterization of Si-based nanostructures;
  • Nanostructures for life sciences and biosensor applications;
  • Defect engineering in nanostructures.

This Special Issue will present unique knowledge to its readers regarding nano-scale physics, as well as the design, fabrication and characterization of nanostructures used in many scientific fields.

Prof. Dr. Henry H. Radamson
Prof. Dr. Guilei Wang
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanomaterials
  • nanodevices
  • CMOS
  • device processing
  • nanosensors
  • nanophotonics
  • defects
  • characterization
  • strain

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Monolithic Integration of O-Band InAs Quantum Dot Lasers with Engineered GaAs Virtual Substrate Based on Silicon
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(15), 2704; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12152704 - 05 Aug 2022
Viewed by 333
Abstract
The realization of high-performance Si-based III-V quantum-dot (QD) lasers has long attracted extensive interest in optoelectronic circuits. This manuscript presents InAs/GaAs QD lasers integrated on an advanced GaAs virtual substrate. The GaAs layer was originally grown on Ge as another virtual substrate on [...] Read more.
The realization of high-performance Si-based III-V quantum-dot (QD) lasers has long attracted extensive interest in optoelectronic circuits. This manuscript presents InAs/GaAs QD lasers integrated on an advanced GaAs virtual substrate. The GaAs layer was originally grown on Ge as another virtual substrate on Si wafer. No patterned substrate or sophisticated superlattice defect-filtering layer was involved. Thanks to the improved quality of the comprehensively modified GaAs crystal with low defect density, the room temperature emission wavelength of this laser was allocated at 1320 nm, with a threshold current density of 24.4 A/cm−2 per layer and a maximum single-facet output power reaching 153 mW at 10 °C. The maximum operation temperature reaches 80 °C. This work provides a feasible and promising proposal for the integration of an efficient O-band laser with a standard Si platform in the near future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Silicon-Based Nanostructures: Fabrication and Characterization)
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Article
Investigation of the Integration of Strained Ge Channel with Si-Based FinFETs
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(9), 1403; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12091403 - 19 Apr 2022
Viewed by 566
Abstract
In this manuscript, the integration of a strained Ge channel with Si-based FinFETs was investigated. The main focus was the preparation of high-aspect-ratio (AR) fin structures, appropriate etching topography and the growth of germanium (Ge) as a channel material with a highly compressive [...] Read more.
In this manuscript, the integration of a strained Ge channel with Si-based FinFETs was investigated. The main focus was the preparation of high-aspect-ratio (AR) fin structures, appropriate etching topography and the growth of germanium (Ge) as a channel material with a highly compressive strain. Two etching methods, the wet etching and in situ HCl dry etching methods, were studied to achieve a better etching topography. In addition, the selective epitaxial growth of Ge material was performed on a patterned substrate using reduced pressure chemical vapor deposition. The results show that a V-shaped structure formed at the bottom of the dummy Si-fins using the wet etching method, which is beneficial to the suppression of dislocations. In addition, compressive strain was introduced to the Ge channel after the Ge selective epitaxial growth, which benefits the pMOS transport characteristics. The pattern dependency of the Ge growth over the patterned wafer was measured, and the solutions for uniform epitaxy are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Silicon-Based Nanostructures: Fabrication and Characterization)
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Article
Growth and Strain Modulation of GeSn Alloys for Photonic and Electronic Applications
Nanomaterials 2022, 12(6), 981; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano12060981 - 16 Mar 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 803
Abstract
GeSn materials have attracted considerable attention for their tunable band structures and high carrier mobilities, which serve well for future photonic and electronic applications. This research presents a novel method to incorporate Sn content as high as 18% into GeSn layers grown at [...] Read more.
GeSn materials have attracted considerable attention for their tunable band structures and high carrier mobilities, which serve well for future photonic and electronic applications. This research presents a novel method to incorporate Sn content as high as 18% into GeSn layers grown at 285–320 °C by using SnCl4 and GeH4 precursors. A series of characterizations were performed to study the material quality, strain, surface roughness, and optical properties of GeSn layers. The Sn content could be calculated using lattice mismatch parameters provided by X-ray analysis. The strain in GeSn layers was modulated from fully strained to partially strained by etching Ge buffer into Ge/GeSn heterostructures . In this study, two categories of samples were prepared when the Ge buffer was either laterally etched onto Si wafers, or vertically etched Ge/GeSnOI wafers which bonded to the oxide. In the latter case, the Ge buffer was initially etched step-by-step for the strain relaxation study. Meanwhile, the Ge/GeSn heterostructure in the first group of samples was patterned into the form of micro-disks. The Ge buffer was selectively etched by using a CF4/O2 gas mixture using a plasma etch tool. Fully or partially relaxed GeSn micro-disks showed photoluminescence (PL) at room temperature. PL results showed that red-shift was clearly observed from the GeSn micro-disk structure, indicating that the compressive strain in the as-grown GeSn material was partially released. Our results pave the path for the growth of high quality GeSn layers with high Sn content, in addition to methods for modulating the strain for lasing and detection of short-wavelength infrared at room temperature. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Silicon-Based Nanostructures: Fabrication and Characterization)
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