Special Issue "Characterization, Synthesis and Applications of 2D Nanomaterials"

A special issue of Nanomaterials (ISSN 2079-4991). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanocomposite Thin Films and 2D Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 August 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Christopher Gibson
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Flinders Centre for NanoScale Science and Technology, College of Science and Engineering, Flinders University, Bedford Park, SA 5042, Australia
Interests: nanotechnology; nanometrology; nanomaterial synthesis and characterisation; microcantilever sensing and characterisation; atomic force microscopy; raman microscopy; electron microscopy
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The synthesis of graphene in 2004 ushered in an exciting new area of scientific research focussed on materials broadly known as 2D materials. Since 2004, a host of 2D materials have been produced, including, for example, Silicene, Phosphorene and Molybdenum disulphide. Some of the unique properties of 2D materials, such as high surface area to volume ratio, surface charge, structure, anisotropic nature and tuneable functionalities, means they have found a wide range of applications in diverse areas of research, such as material science, optoelectronics, microscopy, engineering and biomedical science. While 2D materials have demonstrated remarkable potential, there are still many challenges remaining, including how to determine their thickness or layer number accurately, methods of production that are fast and scalable, and finding new areas of research and industry that can use them effectively. This Special Issue of Nanomaterials is therefore aimed at presenting the very latest developments in the characterization, synthesis and applications of 2D materials by leading research groups in the field.

Dr. Christopher Gibson
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Nanomaterials is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 2D materials
  • characterization
  • nanotechnology
  • synthesis
  • electrical properties
  • thermal properties
  • mechanical properties
  • single layer
  • multi-layer

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Study of Oxidation and Polarization-Dependent Optical Properties of Environmentally Stable Layered GaTe Using a Novel Passivation Approach
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(11), 1510; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9111510 - 23 Oct 2019
Abstract
Emerging two-dimensional gallium chalcogenides, such as gallium telluride (GaTe), are considered promising layered semiconductors that can serve as vital building blocks towards the implementation of nanodevices in the fields of nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, and quantum photonics. However, oxidation-induced electronic, structural, and optical changes observed [...] Read more.
Emerging two-dimensional gallium chalcogenides, such as gallium telluride (GaTe), are considered promising layered semiconductors that can serve as vital building blocks towards the implementation of nanodevices in the fields of nanoelectronics, optoelectronics, and quantum photonics. However, oxidation-induced electronic, structural, and optical changes observed in ambient-exposed gallium chalcogenides need to be further investigated and addressed. Herein, we report on the thickness-dependent effect of air exposure on the Raman and photoluminescence (PL) properties of GaTe flakes, with thicknesses spanning in the range of a few layers to 100 nm. We have developed a novel chemical passivation that results in complete encapsulation of the as-exfoliated GaTe flakes in ultrathin hydrogen–silsesquioxane (HSQ) film. A combination of correlation and comparison of Raman and PL studies reveal that the HSQ-capped GaTe flakes are effectively protected from oxidation in air ambient over the studied-period of one year, and thus, preserving their structural and optical characteristics. This contrasts with the behavior of uncapped GaTe, where we observe a significant reduction of the GaTe-related PL (~100×) and Raman (~4×) peak intensities for the few-layered flakes over a period of few days. The time-evolution of the Raman spectra in uncapped GaTe is accompanied by the appearance of two new prominent broad peaks at ~130 cm−1 and ~146 cm−1, which are attributed to the formation of polycrystalline tellurium, due to oxidation of ambient-exposed GaTe. Furthermore, and by leveraging this novel passivation, we were able to explore the optical anisotropy of HSQ-capped GaTe flakes. This is caused by the one-dimensional-like nature of the GaTe layer, as the layer comprises Ga–Ga chains extending along the b-axis direction. In concurrence with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy analysis, polarization-dependent PL spectroscopy was used to identify the b-axis crystal direction in HSQ-capped GaTe flakes with various thicknesses over a range of wavelengths (458 nm–633 nm). Thus, our novel surface-passivation offers a new approach to explore and reveal the physical properties of the layered GaTe, with the potential of fabricating reliable polarization-dependent nanophotonics with structural and optical stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization, Synthesis and Applications of 2D Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Efficient Production of Multi-Layer Graphene from Graphite Flakes in Water by Lipase-Graphene Sheets Conjugation
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(9), 1344; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9091344 - 19 Sep 2019
Abstract
Biographene was successfully produced in water from graphite flakes by a simple, rapid, and efficient methodology based on a bioexfoliation technology. The methodology consisted in the application of a lipase, with a unique mechanism of interaction with hydrophobic surfaces, combined with a previous [...] Read more.
Biographene was successfully produced in water from graphite flakes by a simple, rapid, and efficient methodology based on a bioexfoliation technology. The methodology consisted in the application of a lipase, with a unique mechanism of interaction with hydrophobic surfaces, combined with a previous mechanical sonication, to selectively generate lipase-graphene sheets conjugates in water at room temperature. The adsorption of the lipase on the graphene sheets permits to keep the sheets separated in comparison with other methods. It was possible to obtain more than 80% of graphene (in the form of multi-layer graphene) from low-cost graphite and with less damage compared to commercial graphene oxide (GO) or reduced GO. Experimental analysis demonstrated the formation of multi-layer graphene (MLG) mainly using lipase from Thermomyces Lanuginosus (TLL). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization, Synthesis and Applications of 2D Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Structural Characterization of Graphene Oxide: Surface Functional Groups and Fractionated Oxidative Debris
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(8), 1180; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9081180 - 18 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The purpose of this work is the structural analysis of graphene oxide (GO) and by means of a new structural model to answer the questions arising from the Lerf–Klinowski and the Lee structural models. Surface functional groups of GO layers and the oxidative [...] Read more.
The purpose of this work is the structural analysis of graphene oxide (GO) and by means of a new structural model to answer the questions arising from the Lerf–Klinowski and the Lee structural models. Surface functional groups of GO layers and the oxidative debris (OD) stacked on them were investigated after OD was extracted. Analysis was performed successfully using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis), X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), Raman spectroscopy, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SSNMR), standardized Boehm potentiometric titration analysis, elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The analysis showed that graphene oxide layers, as well as oxidative debris contain different functional groups such as phenolic –OH, ketone, lactone, carboxyl, quinone and epoxy. Based on these results, a new structural model for GO layers is proposed, which covers all spectroscopic data and explains the presence of the other oxygen functionalities besides carboxyl, phenolic –OH and epoxy groups. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization, Synthesis and Applications of 2D Nanomaterials)
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Open AccessArticle
Nanocomposite Synthesis of Nanodiamond and Molybdenum Disulfide
Nanomaterials 2019, 9(7), 927; https://doi.org/10.3390/nano9070927 - 27 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A chemically conjugated nanodiamond (ND)/MoS2 nanocomposite was synthesized with amine-functionalized MoS2 and acyl chloride-coordinated ND. The chemical structure and morphology of the nanocomposite were characterized to examine the dispersion of MoS2 on the ND platform. The results revealed that the [...] Read more.
A chemically conjugated nanodiamond (ND)/MoS2 nanocomposite was synthesized with amine-functionalized MoS2 and acyl chloride-coordinated ND. The chemical structure and morphology of the nanocomposite were characterized to examine the dispersion of MoS2 on the ND platform. The results revealed that the degree of dispersion was enhanced with increasing ratio of MoS2 nanosheets to ND. Moreover, the nanosheets consisted of several molecular interlayers that were well-dispersed on the ND platform, thereby forming a nanophase. The efficient electrocapacity of the ND/MoS2 nanocomposite was considerably greater than that of the MoS2 electrode alone. Furthermore, the nanophase distribution of MoS2 on ND with a graphitic shell provided a large surface area and reduced the diffusion distance of ions and electrons. Therefore, the nanophase electrode showed higher electrochemical capacitance than that of the MoS2 electrode alone. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Characterization, Synthesis and Applications of 2D Nanomaterials)
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