Special Issue "Interactive Web"

A special issue of Multimodal Technologies and Interaction (ISSN 2414-4088).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 April 2018)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Assoc. Prof. Ahmet Soylu

Department of Computer Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Teknologivn. 22, 2815 Gjøvik, Norway
Website | E-Mail
Interests: data integration, data access, the Semantic Web, ontologies, pervasive computing, human-computer interaction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Web is getting much more complex: On the one hand, the Web is now highly ubiquitous with the variety of internet connected devices, and, on the other hand, more and more data are linked and available on the Web. In this respect, novel approaches and technologies for design, development, and evaluation of interactive web solutions, as well as analysis and investigation of human behavior in such web environments are necessary.

The purpose of this Special Issue is to bring together state-of-the-art research articles on the interactive web. We encourage authors to submit original research articles, case studies, reviews, theoretical and critical perspectives, and viewpoint articles on interactive web technologies, including but not limited to:

  • - Multimodal web,
  • - Mobile interaction,
  • - Distributed user interfaces
  • - Emotional user interfaces,
  • - Motion-based web interaction,
  • - Human interaction in the Web of Things,
  • - Interactive narrative,
  • - Design beyond screen,
  • - End-user design,
  • - Adaptive Web,
  • - Semantic Web Interfaces,
  • - Human-Semantic Web interaction
  • - Human-Web interaction patterns,
  • - Interface-engineering techniques,
  • - User-centered design,
  • - Universal design
  • - Web usability,
  • - Web accessibility,
  • - Development methodologies.
Assoc. Prof. Ahmet Soylu
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Comparative Study of Skeuomorphic and Flat Design from a UX Perspective
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(2), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2020031
Received: 30 April 2018 / Revised: 22 May 2018 / Accepted: 30 May 2018 / Published: 4 June 2018
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Abstract
A key factor influencing the effectiveness of a user interface is the usability resulting from its design, and the overall experience generated while using it, through any kind of device. The two main design trends that prevail in the field of user interface
[...] Read more.
A key factor influencing the effectiveness of a user interface is the usability resulting from its design, and the overall experience generated while using it, through any kind of device. The two main design trends that prevail in the field of user interface design is skeuomorphism and flat design. Skeuomorphism was used in UI design long before flat design and it is built upon the notion of metaphors and affordances. Flat design is the main design trend used in most UIs today and, unlike skeuomorphic design, it is considered as a way to explore the digital medium without trying to reproduce the appearance of the physical world. This paper investigates how users perceive the two design approaches at the level of icon design (in terms of icon recognizability, recall and effectiveness) based on series of experiments and on data collected via a Tobii eye tracker. Moreover, the paper poses the question whether users perceive an overall flat design as more aesthetically attractive or more usable than a skeuomorphic equivalent. All tested hypotheses regarding potential effect of design approach on icon recognizability, task completion time, or number of errors were rejected but users perceived flat design as more usable. The last issue considered was how users respond to functionally equivalent flat and skeuomorphic variations of websites when given specific tasks to execute. Most tested hypotheses that website design affects task completion durations, user expected and experienced difficulty, or SUS (System Usability Scale) and meCUE questionnaires scores were rejected but there was a correlation between skeuomorphic design and increased experienced difficulty, as well as design type and SUS scores but not in both websites examined. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactive Web)
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Open AccessArticle Who Is at Risk for Problematic Video Gaming? Risk Factors in Problematic Video Gaming in Clinically Referred Canadian Children and Adolescents
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2020019
Received: 13 March 2018 / Revised: 13 April 2018 / Accepted: 23 April 2018 / Published: 26 April 2018
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Abstract
Both Internet and offline video gaming have become a normal aspect of child development, with estimates of children playing video games ranging from 90% to 97%. Research on problematic video gaming (PVG) has grown substantially in the last decade. Much of that research
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Both Internet and offline video gaming have become a normal aspect of child development, with estimates of children playing video games ranging from 90% to 97%. Research on problematic video gaming (PVG) has grown substantially in the last decade. Much of that research has focused on community samples, while research on clinically referred children and youth is lacking. The present study includes 5820 clinically referred children and youth across 44 mental health agencies, assessed using the interRAI Child and Youth Mental Health Assessment. Logistic regression analyses revealed that older age, male sex, extreme shyness, internalizing symptoms, externalizing symptoms, and poor relational strengths are all significant predictors of problematic video gaming (PVG). Further analyses suggested that, out of the internalizing symptoms, anhedonia was predictive of PVG in both males and females, but depressive symptoms and anxiety were not predictive of PVG when controlling for other variables in the model. Moreover, proactive aggression and extreme shyness were predictive of PVG in males, but not in females. The implications of these findings are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactive Web)
Open AccessArticle Enhancing Privacy in Wearable IoT through a Provenance Architecture
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2020018
Received: 23 February 2018 / Revised: 19 April 2018 / Accepted: 20 April 2018 / Published: 23 April 2018
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Abstract
The Internet of Things (IoT) is inspired by network interconnectedness of humans, objects, and cloud services to facilitate new use cases and new business models across multiple enterprise domains including healthcare. This creates the need for continuous data streaming in IoT architectures which
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The Internet of Things (IoT) is inspired by network interconnectedness of humans, objects, and cloud services to facilitate new use cases and new business models across multiple enterprise domains including healthcare. This creates the need for continuous data streaming in IoT architectures which are mainly designed following the broadcast model. The model facilitates IoT devices to sense and deliver information to other nodes (e.g., cloud, physical objects, etc.) that are interested in the information. However, this is a recipe for privacy breaches since sensitive data, such as personal vitals from wearables, can be delivered to undesired sniffing nodes. In order to protect users’ privacy and manufacturers’ IP, as well as detecting and blocking malicious activity, this research paper proposes privacy-oriented IoT architecture following the provenance technique. This ensures that the IoT data will only be delivered to the nodes that subscribe to receive the information. Using the provenance technique to ensure high transparency, the work is able to provide trace routes for digital audit trail. Several empirical evaluations are conducted in a real-world wearable IoT ecosystem to prove the superiority of the proposed work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactive Web)
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Open AccessArticle Webometrics: Some Critical Issues of WWW Size Estimation Methods
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(2), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2020012
Received: 12 February 2018 / Revised: 24 March 2018 / Accepted: 30 March 2018 / Published: 2 April 2018
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Abstract
The number of webpages in the Internet has increased tremendously over the last two decades however only a part of it is indexed by various search engines. This small portion is the indexable web of the Internet and can be usually reachable from
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The number of webpages in the Internet has increased tremendously over the last two decades however only a part of it is indexed by various search engines. This small portion is the indexable web of the Internet and can be usually reachable from a Search Engine. Search engines play a big role in making the World Wide Web accessible to the end user, and how much of the World Wide Web is accessible on the size of the search engine’s index. Researchers have proposed several ways to estimate this size of the indexable web using search engines with and without privileged access to the search engine’s database. Our report provides a summary of methods used in the last two decades to estimate the size of the World Wide Web, as well as describe how this knowledge can be used in other aspects/tasks concerning the World Wide Web. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactive Web)
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