Special Issue "Human-Food Interaction"

A special issue of Multimodal Technologies and Interaction (ISSN 2414-4088).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2018)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Rohit Ashok Khot

School of Media and Communication, RMIT University, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: human food interaction; playful design; HCI; personal informatics; research through design; multimodal interactions; tangible interfaces
Guest Editor
Dr. Jaz Hee-jeong Choi

College of Design and Social Context, RMIT University, Australia
Website | E-Mail
Interests: design; care; play; co-creative futures; impactful methods; urban informatics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

While food has always played a crucial role in lives of all living bodies, our contemporary concerns about food expands rapidly with nascent technological, environmental, and social disruptions [1]. For example, digital and network technologies have been making fundamental changes to how we live and die. The ways in which food is produced, prepared, and consumed are transforming, from broader systemic changes such as distribution and waste logistics to new and experimental exploration of designing material encounters with food, as seen in the rise of gastrophysics [2] as a transdisciplinary field of research and practice. Technologies are also transforming diverse and complex socio-cultural aspects of food. For example, values and practices of commensality and food security, ethics around lab-grown meat and quantified nutrition, and new creative and playful experiences around food. With food as a fundamental desideratum for humans and more-than-humans, how might we engage with and navigate the complex disciplinary, political, and cultural landscapes through research?

This special issue invites contributions from across disciplines, with a strong focus on inter-/transdisciplinary research methods and innovative exploration of food not only as matters of fact, but of concern [3].

[1] Choi, J. H.-j., Foth, M., Hearn, G. N. (Eds.). (2014). Eat Cook Grow : Mixing Human-Computer Interactions with Human-Food Interactions. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

[2] Spence, C., Blumenthal, H. Gastrophysics : the new science of eating.

[3] Bruno Latour. Why Has Critique Run out of Steam? From Matters of Fact to Matters of Concern. Critical Inquiry, 2004, 30, 225-248, doi:10.1086/421123.

Dr. Rohit Ashok Khot
Dr. Jaz Hee-jeong Choi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) is waived for well-prepared manuscripts submitted to this issue. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • FoodCHI 
  • Design 
  • Human-Computer Interaction 
  • User Experience 
  • Methodological Innovation 
  • Creative Practice 
  • Playful food experience 
  • Quantified nutrition 
  • Digital commensality

Published Papers (3 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-3
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle Designing to the Pattern: A Storytelling Prototype for Food Growers
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(4), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2040073
Received: 23 June 2018 / Revised: 11 October 2018 / Accepted: 15 October 2018 / Published: 18 October 2018
PDF Full-text (3207 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We present the design and pilot study of QuickTales, a mobile storytelling platform through which urban gardeners can share gardening experiences. QuickTales was built as a response to design patterns, drawing on previous studies we conducted with residential gardeners and different gardening communities [...] Read more.
We present the design and pilot study of QuickTales, a mobile storytelling platform through which urban gardeners can share gardening experiences. QuickTales was built as a response to design patterns, drawing on previous studies we conducted with residential gardeners and different gardening communities in a large Australian city. Given the diversity of needs and wants of urban gardeners, the intent for QuickTales was for it to serve as a multi-purpose tool for different individuals and groups across the local urban agriculture ecology. The evaluation provides initial insights into the use of storytelling in this context. We reflect on the use of design patterns to as they were used to inform the design of QuickTales, and propose opportunities for further design pattern development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human-Food Interaction)
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Curating Inclusive Cities through Food and Art
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(3), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2030044
Received: 28 June 2018 / Revised: 26 July 2018 / Accepted: 31 July 2018 / Published: 4 August 2018
PDF Full-text (216 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Flavours of Glenroy (2013–4) was an action research project where artists imagined mobile edible gardens as a way to connect and engage with locals through project presentation and execution. As a socially engaged art project, it focused on developing ways to connect the [...] Read more.
Flavours of Glenroy (2013–4) was an action research project where artists imagined mobile edible gardens as a way to connect and engage with locals through project presentation and execution. As a socially engaged art project, it focused on developing ways to connect the mobile, diverse and transforming community of Glenroy, Victoria, Australia. The transnational, Australian dream suburb, reflecting the fluid and globalizing conditions of our cities, was emphasized through the strategy of growing and distributing plants using a mobile system that aligned with the mobility and diversity of the suburb. The project emphasized how social relations, encouraged through art, has the capacity to transform public spaces, providing a platform to introduce new voices and narratives of a community and encourage inclusive participation in sustainable citizenship. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human-Food Interaction)
Open AccessArticle ‘I Just Want It to Be Done, Done, Done!’ Food Tracking Apps, Affects, and Agential Capacities
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2018, 2(2), 29; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2020029
Received: 25 March 2018 / Revised: 12 May 2018 / Accepted: 22 May 2018 / Published: 23 May 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (230 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Food-tracking apps constitute a major category of the thousands of food-related apps now available. They are promoted as helping users monitor and measure their food consumption to improve their health or to lose weight. In this article, I present six vignettes drawn from [...] Read more.
Food-tracking apps constitute a major category of the thousands of food-related apps now available. They are promoted as helping users monitor and measure their food consumption to improve their health or to lose weight. In this article, I present six vignettes drawn from interviews with Australian women about their use and non-use of food-tracking apps. The vignettes provide detailed insights into the experiences of these women and their broader sociocultural and biographical contexts. The analysis is based on feminist materialism theoretical perspectives, seeking to identify the relational connections, affective forces, and agential capacities generated in and through the human-app assemblage. The vignettes reveal that affective forces related to the desire to control and manage the body and conform to norms and ideals about good health and body weight inspire people to try food-tracking apps. However, the agential capacities promised by app developers may not be generated even when people have committed hope and effort in using the app. Frustration, disappointment, the fear of becoming too controlled, and annoyance or guilt evoked by the demands of the app can be barriers to continued and successful use. Sociocultural and biographical contexts and relational connections are also central to the capacities of human-app assemblages. Women’s ambivalences about using apps as part of efforts to control their body weight are sited within their struggles to conform to accepted ideals of physical appearance but also their awareness that these struggles may be too limiting of their agency. This analysis, therefore, draws attention to what a body can and cannot do as it comes together with food tracking apps. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human-Food Interaction)
Multimodal Technologies Interact. EISSN 2414-4088 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top