Special Issue "Automotive User Interfaces"

A special issue of Multimodal Technologies and Interaction (ISSN 2414-4088).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 August 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Alexander Meschtscherjakov
Website
Guest Editor
University of Salzburg, Center for Human-Computer Interaction, Austria
Interests: automotive user interfaces; autonomous driving; persuasive technologies; user experience research
Dr. Ronald Schroeter
Website
Guest Editor
Centre for Accident Research and Road Safety – Queensland (CARRS-Q), Faculty of Health, School - Psychology and Counselling, Queensland University of Technology, Australia
Interests: automotive user interfaces; autonomous driving; intelligent transport systems; road safety; games; augmented reality; user experience research
Prof. Dr. Manfred Tscheligi
Website
Guest Editor
Affiliation 1: Center for Human-Computer Interaction, University of Salzburg, Salzburg, Austria
Affiliation 2: Center for Technology Experience, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Vienna, Austria
Interests: interactive systems; human–computer interaction; usability engineering; user interface design and user experience research
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The overall goal of this Special Issue is to explore and evaluate automotive user interfaces, interaction design, and user experience. It targets original and scientifically-grounded research, as well as design-oriented research undertaken in the automotive realm.                                   

This Special Issue is focused on novel multimodal technologies and interactions, such as rich touch, gesture and speech interaction, Augmented Reality (AR) and Head-Up Displays (HUD) applications, etc. In a time of automation, we are also interested in new interaction approaches with Advanced Driver Assistant Systems (ADAS) and more broadly the interaction with automated vehicles inside and outside. Approaches to study driver distraction and engagement, design for trust and ethics in automotive research are welcomed. Work on multimodal user interfaces in special vehicles, such as trucks or electric vehicles is appreciated.

Submissions can include empirical and theoretical research, or be more interaction design focused, ranging from thought-provoking theory and novel methods, creative interaction concepts and innovative prototypes, to laboratory and (naturalistic) field studies.   


Dr. Alexander Meschtscherjakov
Prof. Dr. Manfred Tscheligi
Dr. Ronald Schroeter
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Automotive multimodal interaction
  • Automotive User Interfaces (UI)
  • Interaction Design (IxD) and User Experience (UX) in automobiles
  • Rich touch, gesture, speech, gaze and brain-computer interaction
  • In-vehicle Augmented Reality (AR)
  • Windshield- and Head-up-Displays (HUD)
  • Interaction with Advanced Driver Assistant Systems (ADAS)
  • Automated vehicles and autonomous driving
  • Driver distraction
  • Driver engagement
  • Acceptance, trust and ethics in automotive research
  • Multimodal interaction with vulnerable road users (VRU)
  • UIs in special vehicles (trucks, electric vehicles, car sharing, etc.)
  • Automotive simulator and (naturalistic) field studies

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
A Survey to Understand Emotional Situations on the Road and What They Mean for Affective Automotive UIs
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2018, 2(4), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2040075 - 25 Oct 2018
Cited by 6
Abstract
In this paper, we present the results of an online survey (N = 170) on emotional situations on the road. In particular, we asked potential early adopters to remember a situation where they felt either an intense positive or negative emotion while driving. [...] Read more.
In this paper, we present the results of an online survey (N = 170) on emotional situations on the road. In particular, we asked potential early adopters to remember a situation where they felt either an intense positive or negative emotion while driving. Our research is motivated by imminent disruptions in the automotive sector due to automated driving and the accompanying switch to selling driving experiences over horsepower. This creates a need to focus on the driver’s emotion when designing in-car interfaces. As a result of our research, we present a set of propositions for affective car interfaces based on real-life experiences. With our work we aim to support the design of affective car interfaces and give designers a foundation to build upon. We find respondents often connect positive emotions with enjoying their independence, while negative experiences are associated mostly with traffic behavior. Participants who experienced negative situations wished for better information management and a higher degree of automation. Drivers with positive emotions generally wanted to experience the situation more genuinely, for example, by switching to a “back-to-basic” mode. We explore these statements and discuss recommendations for the design of affective interfaces in future cars. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Automotive User Interfaces)
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Open AccessArticle
Participatory Prototyping to Inform the Development of a Remote UX Design System in the Automotive Domain
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2018, 2(4), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2040074 - 24 Oct 2018
Abstract
This study reports on the empirical findings of participatory design workshops for the development of a supportive automotive user experience design system. Identifying and addressing this area with traditional research methods is problematic due to the different user experience (UX) design perspectives that [...] Read more.
This study reports on the empirical findings of participatory design workshops for the development of a supportive automotive user experience design system. Identifying and addressing this area with traditional research methods is problematic due to the different user experience (UX) design perspectives that might conflict and the related limitations of the automotive domain. To help resolve this problem, we conducted research with 12 user experience (UX) designers through individual participatory prototyping activities to gain insights into their explicit, observable, tacit and latent needs. These activities allowed us to explore their motivation to use different technologies; the system’s architecture; detailed features of interactivity; and to describe user needs including efficiency, effectiveness, engagement, naturalness, ease of use, information retrieval, self-image awareness, politeness, and flexibility. Our analysis led us to design implications that translate participants’ needs into UX design goals, informing practitioners on how to develop relevant systems further. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Automotive User Interfaces)
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Open AccessArticle
Catch My Drift: Elevating Situation Awareness for Highly Automated Driving with an Explanatory Windshield Display User Interface
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2018, 2(4), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2040071 - 11 Oct 2018
Cited by 4
Abstract
Broad access to automated cars (ACs) that can reliably and unconditionally drive in all environments is still some years away. Urban areas pose a particular challenge to ACs, since even perfectly reliable systems may be forced to execute sudden reactive driving maneuvers in [...] Read more.
Broad access to automated cars (ACs) that can reliably and unconditionally drive in all environments is still some years away. Urban areas pose a particular challenge to ACs, since even perfectly reliable systems may be forced to execute sudden reactive driving maneuvers in hard-to-predict hazardous situations. This may negatively surprise the driver, possibly causing discomfort, anxiety or loss of trust, which might be a risk for the acceptance of the technology in general. To counter this, we suggest an explanatory windshield display interface with augmented reality (AR) elements to support driver situation awareness (SA). It provides the driver with information about the car’s perceptive capabilities and driving decisions. We created a prototype in a human-centered approach and implemented the interface in a mixed-reality driving simulation. We conducted a user study to assess its influence on driver SA. We collected objective SA scores and self-ratings, both of which yielded a significant improvement with our interface in good (medium effect) and in bad (large effect) visibility conditions. We conclude that explanatory AR interfaces could be a viable measure against unwarranted driver discomfort and loss of trust in critical urban situations by elevating SA. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Automotive User Interfaces)
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Open AccessArticle
Takeover Requests in Highly Automated Truck Driving: How Do the Amount and Type of Additional Information Influence the Driver–Automation Interaction?
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2018, 2(4), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti2040068 - 04 Oct 2018
Cited by 7
Abstract
Vehicle automation is linked to various benefits, such as increase in fuel and transport efficiency as well as increase in driving comfort. However, automation also comes with a variety of possible downsides, e.g., loss of situational awareness, loss of skills, and inappropriate trust [...] Read more.
Vehicle automation is linked to various benefits, such as increase in fuel and transport efficiency as well as increase in driving comfort. However, automation also comes with a variety of possible downsides, e.g., loss of situational awareness, loss of skills, and inappropriate trust levels regarding system functionality. Drawbacks differ at different automation levels. As highly automated driving (HAD, level 3) requires the driver to take over the driving task in critical situations within a limited period of time, the need for an appropriate human–machine interface (HMI) arises. To foster adequate and efficient human–machine interaction, this contribution presents a user-centered, iterative approach for HMI evaluation of highly automated truck driving. For HMI evaluation, a driving simulator study [n = 32] using a dynamic truck driving simulator was conducted to let users experience the HMI in a semi-real driving context. Participants rated three HMI concepts, differing in their informational content for HAD regarding acceptance, workload, user experience, and controllability. Results showed that all three HMI concepts achieved good to very good results in these measures. Overall, HMI concepts offering more information to the driver about the HAD system showed significantly higher ratings, depicting the positive effect of additional information on the driver–automation interaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Automotive User Interfaces)
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