Special Issue "Theoretical and Pedagogical Perspectives on Augmented Reality"

A special issue of Multimodal Technologies and Interaction (ISSN 2414-4088).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 August 2021) | Viewed by 18258

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Gokce Akcayir
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Computing Science, Edtekla Research Group, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G 2E8, Canada
Interests: AR/VR in education; community-engaged research; flipped classroom; using social networking sites for educational purposes
Dr. Nikolaos Pellas
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Communication and Digital Media, University of Western Macedonia, 52100 Kastoria, Greece
Interests: educational technology; child-computer interaction; game-based learning; virtual reality; augmented reality
Dr. Heinrich Söbke
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Bauhaus-Institute for Infrastructure Solutions, Bauhaus-Universität Weimar, Weimar, Germany
Interests: AR/VR in education; serious games; gamification; engineering education
Dr. Yun Wen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Institution of Education, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Interests: AR in education; computer-supported collaborative learning; computer-assisted language learning; learning design; learning analytics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The use of AR in education has been a focus of scholarly research for the last decade. Extensive documentation of its positive effects on learning outcomes demonstrates that AR helps to facilitate and promote learning in various contexts. However, a substantial number of studies also indicate that challenges and issues may be encountered when using AR for educational purposes; these include timing problems and instructors’ and learners’ lack of familiarity with the uses for AR in learning activities. The many benefits that AR can provide may be obtained without possible drawbacks, if a well-designed learning experience is supported by an appropriate pedagogical approach.

Studies on exploring and building pedagogical approaches specifically for the use of AR in education are still in great demand. More research is needed to provide empirically supported theoretical approaches, including frameworks, methods, and strategies specific to the use of AR in education. To reinforce and promote this research, theoretical discussions and implications are also needed. For this reason, this Special Issue will focus on both theoretical discussions and practical approaches for using AR in education.

We encourage authors to submit original research articles, case studies, reviews, and viewpoint articles featuring perspectives on AR in education, including but not limited to the following topics:

  • Pedagogical models and frameworks for AR in educational settings
  • Extensions (or alignments) for existing pedagogical approaches of AR use in education
  • AR-supported instructional design models
  • Theoretical discussions or pedagogical models/frameworks specific to formal or informal learning contexts, different learning subjects, and different types of AR (e.g., location-based)
  • Theoretical discussions on current issues related to AR in education (e.g., privacy and security, ethical issues and considerations, or the use of learning analytics within educational AR)
  • Theoretical discussions or pedagogical models/frameworks for educational AR design (e.g., user experiences (UX), experience assessment, or interaction design (ID))

Dr. Gokce Akcayir
Dr. Nikolaos Pellas
Dr. Heinrich Söbke
Dr. Yun Wen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Article
Augmented Reality for Autistic Children to Enhance Their Understanding of Facial Expressions
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2021, 5(8), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti5080048 - 23 Aug 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 2148
Abstract
Difficulty in understanding the feelings and behavior of other people is considered one of the main symptoms of autism. Computer technology has increasingly been used in interventions with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), especially augmented reality, to either treat or alleviate ASD symptomatology. Augmented [...] Read more.
Difficulty in understanding the feelings and behavior of other people is considered one of the main symptoms of autism. Computer technology has increasingly been used in interventions with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), especially augmented reality, to either treat or alleviate ASD symptomatology. Augmented reality is an engaging type of technology that helps children interact easily and understand and remember information, and it is not limited to one age group or level of education. This study utilized AR to display faces with six different basic facial expressions—happiness, sadness, surprise, fear, disgust, and anger—to help children to recognize facial features and associate facial expressions with a simultaneous human condition. The most important point of this system is that children can interact with the system in a friendly and safe way. Additionally, our results showed the system enhanced social interactions, talking, and facial expressions for both autistic and typical children. Therefore, AR might have a significant upcoming role in talking about the therapeutic necessities of children with ASD. This paper presents evidence for the feasibility of one of the specialized AR systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Theoretical and Pedagogical Perspectives on Augmented Reality)
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Article
Innovative Teacher Education with the Augmented Reality Device Microsoft HoloLens—Results of an Exploratory Study and Pedagogical Considerations
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2021, 5(8), 45; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti5080045 - 13 Aug 2021
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2592
Abstract
Augmented Reality (AR) tools are increasingly finding their way into education settings. Although their use is still not widespread in educational contexts, the research literature indicates their potential and effectiveness. However, overall and specifically for the education sector there are still numerous research [...] Read more.
Augmented Reality (AR) tools are increasingly finding their way into education settings. Although their use is still not widespread in educational contexts, the research literature indicates their potential and effectiveness. However, overall and specifically for the education sector there are still numerous research gaps. This study investigates how the use of head-mounted AR displays such as the Microsoft HoloLens can change learning and what needs to be considered from a didactic perspective. The researched sample consists of 18 student teachers with a nature and technology teaching profile of a German-speaking university of teacher education. The data collection included a written questionnaire, video recordings of a teaching unit with HoloLens examining molecular structures, and one-to-one semi-structured interviews. The results of questionnaires and interviews presented in this paper show that all students were highly motivated to work with this technology in teacher education. The usability of the HoloLens was rated very satisfactory, although many students expressed minor problems. Most students attributed a positive impact on learning to the AR device and stated that the usage of the devices increased their motivation for learning the topic. Overall, the results show that the use of AR in teacher education is considered very valuable and should be increasingly employed in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Theoretical and Pedagogical Perspectives on Augmented Reality)
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Article
Students as Designers of Augmented Reality: Impact on Learning and Motivation in Computer Science
by and
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2021, 5(8), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti5080041 - 24 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2592
Abstract
In this study, we report findings from the PCBuildAR project, in which students developed augmented reality (AR) artifacts following a guided design-based learning (DBL) approach. Sixty-two students participated in the study and were either in their first year to learn about computer science [...] Read more.
In this study, we report findings from the PCBuildAR project, in which students developed augmented reality (AR) artifacts following a guided design-based learning (DBL) approach. Sixty-two students participated in the study and were either in their first year to learn about computer science or were more experienced computer science students. In terms of learning performance, only the first-year students benefited from our guided DBL approach. In contrast, the experienced students were highly motivated to learn computer science not only immediately after the intervention, but also in the long term. For first-year students, this effect was only evident directly after the intervention. Overall, the guided DBL design proved to be effective for both motivation and learning, especially for younger students. For older learners, a better balance between guidance and autonomy is recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Theoretical and Pedagogical Perspectives on Augmented Reality)
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Article
TrainAR: A Scalable Interaction Concept and Didactic Framework for Procedural Trainings Using Handheld Augmented Reality
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2021, 5(7), 30; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti5070030 - 22 Jun 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2361
Abstract
The potential of Augmented Reality (AR) for educational and training purposes is well known. While large-scale deployments of head-mounted AR headsets remain challenging due to technical limitations and cost factors, advances in mobile devices and tracking solutions introduce handheld AR devices as a [...] Read more.
The potential of Augmented Reality (AR) for educational and training purposes is well known. While large-scale deployments of head-mounted AR headsets remain challenging due to technical limitations and cost factors, advances in mobile devices and tracking solutions introduce handheld AR devices as a powerful, broadly available alternative, yet with some restrictions. One of the current limitations of AR training applications on handheld AR devices is that most offer rather static experiences, only providing descriptive knowledge with little interactivity. Holistic concepts for the coverage of procedural knowledge are largely missing. The contribution of this paper is twofold. We propose a scalabe interaction concept for handheld AR devices with an accompanied didactic framework for procedural training tasks called TrainAR. Then, we implement TrainAR for a training scenario in academics for the context of midwifery and explain the educational theories behind our framework and how to apply it for procedural training tasks. We evaluate and subsequently improve the concept based on three formative usability studies (n = 24), where explicitness, redundant feedback mechanisms and onboarding were identified as major success factors. Finally, we conclude by discussing derived implications for improvements and ongoing and future work. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Theoretical and Pedagogical Perspectives on Augmented Reality)
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Article
A Learning Analytics Conceptual Framework for Augmented Reality-Supported Educational Case Studies
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2021, 5(3), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti5030009 - 03 Mar 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3643
Abstract
The deployment of augmented reality (AR) has attracted educators’ interest and introduced new opportunities in education. Additionally, the advancement of artificial intelligence has enabled educational researchers to apply innovative methods and techniques for the monitoring and evaluation of the teaching and learning process. [...] Read more.
The deployment of augmented reality (AR) has attracted educators’ interest and introduced new opportunities in education. Additionally, the advancement of artificial intelligence has enabled educational researchers to apply innovative methods and techniques for the monitoring and evaluation of the teaching and learning process. The so-called learning analytics (LA) discipline emerged with the promise to revolutionize traditional instructional practices by introducing systematic and multidimensional ways to improve the effectiveness of the instructional process. However, the implementation of LA methods is usually associated with web-based platforms, which offer direct access to learners’ data with minimal effort or adjustments. On the other hand, the complex nature of immersive technologies and the diverse instructional approaches which are utilized in different scientific domains have limited the opportunities for research and development in this direction. Within these research contexts, we present a conceptual framework that describes the elements of an LA process tailored to the information that can be gathered from the use of educational applications, and further provide an indicative case study for AR-supported educational interventions. The current work contributes by elucidating and concretizing the design elements of AR-supported applications and provides researchers and designers with guidelines on how to apply instructional strategies in (augmented) real-world projects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Theoretical and Pedagogical Perspectives on Augmented Reality)
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Review

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Review
An Overview of Twenty-Five Years of Augmented Reality in Education
Multimodal Technol. Interact. 2021, 5(7), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti5070037 - 08 Jul 2021
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 3372
Abstract
Augmented reality (AR) enables an interactive experience with the real world where real-world objects are enhanced with computer-generated perceptual information. Twenty-five years have passed since the first AR application designed exclusively to be used in educational settings. Since then, this technology has been [...] Read more.
Augmented reality (AR) enables an interactive experience with the real world where real-world objects are enhanced with computer-generated perceptual information. Twenty-five years have passed since the first AR application designed exclusively to be used in educational settings. Since then, this technology has been successfully implemented to enrich educational contexts providing learning gains, motivation, enjoyment, autonomy, among other benefits. This study provides an overview of AR technology in education from its origins to the present. Consequently, based on the analysis of its evolution, the study defines three generations of AR in education. Moreover, the study identifies some major challenges from previous AR applications and, finally, it poses some insights to address these challenges to enhance the benefits of AR for education. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Theoretical and Pedagogical Perspectives on Augmented Reality)
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