Special Issue "Interactive 3D Cartography"

A special issue of Multimodal Technologies and Interaction (ISSN 2414-4088).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 April 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Lorenz Hurni
Website
Guest Editor
ETH Zurich, Institute of Cartography and Geoinformation, Zurich ZH, Switzerland. Author ID: 6603125833
Interests: cartographic data models; tools and visualization; thematic mapping; terrain representation; 3D cartography; geo-data portals; interactive atlases; historic map data exploration
Dr. Hans Rudolf Bär
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Cartography and Geoinformation, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Interests: interactive maps and atlases; literary cartography; school atlases; computer graphics; web programming
Dr. René Sieber
Website
Guest Editor
Chair “Commission on Atlases”, International Cartographic Association (ICA)
Institute of Cartography and Geoinformation, ETH Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland
Interests: atlas cartography; 3D visualization; graphic design

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cartography comprises the visualisation of geographical objects and spatially distributed phenomena by means of abstraction, generalization and representative symbols. With the advancement of 3D computer graphics, human–computer interaction (HCI) methods, and new devices, the possibilities of creating new types of map representations and interaction types have dramatically increased. In this Special Issue, we would like to invite you to submit contributions towards novel 3D visualisations, methodologies, and technologies for interactive cartographic applications. Topics may range from cartographic 3D geo-data models, abstracted 3D representation and symbolization of topographic and thematic geo-data, analysis and visual exploration of the geo-data space on different devices and media, innovative interaction modalities, up to applications in various scientific domains. The Special Issue should identify ways to present, analyse, and explore interactions for new three-dimensional immersive geo-data spaces.

Prof. Dr. Lorenz Hurni
Dr. Hansruedi Bär
Dr. René Sieber
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Multimodal Technologies and Interaction is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 3D cartography and maps
  • 3D geo-data models
  • 3D map design
  • 3D map symbolization
  • 3D terrain modelling and representation
  • Topographic and thematic 3D maps
  • 3D map labelling
  • 3D map exploration and analytics
  • 3D maps in virtual engineering
  • 3D visualization of non-geographic spaces
  • Cartographic 3D animations
  • 3D real-time maps
  • 3D soundscapes
  • The 3D map as an interface
  • User interface design for 3D maps
  • Adaptive user interface elements (e.g. smart legends)
  • Multimodal applications
  • Virtual reality
  • Augmented reality
  • Mixed reality, blended representations
  • Immersion
  • Virtual globes
  • CGI for 3D map rendering
  • Level of detail (LOD)
  • HCI (gaze-, gesture- touch-, speech-, mind-controlled,…)
  • Devices (stereoscopic displays, head-mounted displays, virtual reality glasses, holography…)
  • 3D printing
  • 3D tactile maps
  • Usability and user studies
  • Domain-specific applications

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Analogue Meets Digital: History and Present IT Augmentation of Europe’s Largest Landscape Relief Model in Villach, Austria
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(2), 44; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3020044 - 20 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Brought to completion in 1913 after a production time of 24 years, the landscape relief model of Carinthia (Kärnten), on display in Villach, Austria, is, at 182 m², the largest of its kind in Europe. It is painted with nature-like land-cover information and [...] Read more.
Brought to completion in 1913 after a production time of 24 years, the landscape relief model of Carinthia (Kärnten), on display in Villach, Austria, is, at 182 m², the largest of its kind in Europe. It is painted with nature-like land-cover information and presents the whole federal state of Carinthia and its surroundings including Austria’s highest peak, Großglockner, at a scale of 1:10,000. From 2016 to 2018, a series of computer-generated and partly computer-animated educational contents for rental tablets as well as for projection onto the terrain model and above it have been produced. Their topics are briefly presented. The described Relief von Kärnten is also a paramount example and master copy of how to improve the attractivity of historical physical landscape relief models by means of state-of-the-art information technology. The article is, furthermore, meant to raise awareness for a piece of “geo-art”, which is worth being known at an international scale by both experts and laymen. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactive 3D Cartography)
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Open AccessArticle
Interactive Landscape Design and Flood Visualisation in Augmented Reality
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(2), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3020043 - 15 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
In stakeholder participation workshops, digital and hard-copy maps, alongside other representation formats in 2D and 3D, are used extensively to support communication, spatial evaluation and interactive decision making processes. In this paper, we present a novel tool to enhance traditional map-based workshop activities [...] Read more.
In stakeholder participation workshops, digital and hard-copy maps, alongside other representation formats in 2D and 3D, are used extensively to support communication, spatial evaluation and interactive decision making processes. In this paper, we present a novel tool to enhance traditional map-based workshop activities using augmented reality. Augmented reality technology is gaining momentum as a tool for visualising environmental design choices in planning and design, and is used in a range of applications including stakeholder participation, design evaluation and flood risk communication. We demonstrate interactive and collaborative 3D cartographic visualisations which enable real-time multi-user exercises in landscape intervention design and flood visualisation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactive 3D Cartography)
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Open AccessArticle
3D Point Clouds and Eye Tracking for Investigating the Perception and Acceptance of Power Lines in Different Landscapes
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(2), 40; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3020040 - 04 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The perception of the visual landscape impact is a significant factor explaining the public’s acceptance of energy infrastructure developments. Yet, there is lack of knowledge how people perceive and accept power lines in certain landscape types and in combination with wind turbines, a [...] Read more.
The perception of the visual landscape impact is a significant factor explaining the public’s acceptance of energy infrastructure developments. Yet, there is lack of knowledge how people perceive and accept power lines in certain landscape types and in combination with wind turbines, a required setting to achieve goals of the energy turnaround. The goal of this work was to demonstrate how 3D point cloud visualizations could be used for an eye tracking study to systematically investigate the perception of landscape scenarios with power lines. 3D visualizations of near-natural and urban landscapes were prepared based on data from airborne and terrestrial laser scanning. These scenes were altered with varying amounts of the respective infrastructure, and they provided the stimuli in a laboratory experiment with 49 participants. Eye tracking and questionnaires served for measuring the participants’ responses. The results show that the point cloud-based simulations offered suitable stimuli for the eye tracking study. Particularly for the analysis of guided perceptions, the approach fostered an understanding of disturbing landscape elements. A comparative in situ eye tracking study is recommended to further evaluate the quality of the point cloud simulations, whether they produce similar responses as in the real world. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactive 3D Cartography)
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Open AccessArticle
Combining VR Visualization and Sonification for Immersive Exploration of Urban Noise Standards
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(2), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3020034 - 13 May 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Urban traffic noise situations are usually visualized as conventional 2D maps or 3D scenes. These representations are indispensable tools to inform decision makers and citizens about issues of health, safety, and quality of life but require expert knowledge in order to be properly [...] Read more.
Urban traffic noise situations are usually visualized as conventional 2D maps or 3D scenes. These representations are indispensable tools to inform decision makers and citizens about issues of health, safety, and quality of life but require expert knowledge in order to be properly understood and put into context. The subjectivity of how we perceive noise as well as the inaccuracies in common noise calculation standards are rarely represented. We present a virtual reality application that seeks to offer an audiovisual glimpse into the background workings of one of these standards, by employing a multisensory, immersive analytics approach that allows users to interactively explore and listen to an approximate rendering of the data in the same environment that the noise simulation occurs in. In order for this approach to be useful, it should manage complicated noise level calculations in a real time environment and run on commodity low-cost VR hardware. In a prototypical implementation, we utilized simple VR interactions common to current mobile VR headsets and combined them with techniques from data visualization and sonification to allow users to explore road traffic noise in an immersive real-time urban environment. The noise levels were calculated over CityGML LoD2 building geometries, in accordance with Common Noise Assessment Methods in Europe (CNOSSOS-EU) sound propagation methods. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactive 3D Cartography)
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Open AccessArticle
Cartographic Visualization for Indoor Semantic Wayfinding
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3010022 - 26 Mar 2019
Abstract
In recent years, pedestrian navigation assistance has been used by an increasing number of people to support wayfinding tasks. Especially in unfamiliar and complex indoor environments such as universities and hospitals, the importance of an effective navigation assistance becomes apparent. This paper investigates [...] Read more.
In recent years, pedestrian navigation assistance has been used by an increasing number of people to support wayfinding tasks. Especially in unfamiliar and complex indoor environments such as universities and hospitals, the importance of an effective navigation assistance becomes apparent. This paper investigates the feasibility of the indoor landmark navigation model (ILNM), a method for generating landmark-based routing instructions, by combining it with indoor route maps and conducting a wayfinding experiment with human participants. Within this context, three different cartographic visualization scenarios were designed and evaluated. Two of these scenarios were based on the implementation of the ILNM algorithm, with the concurrent effort to overcome the challenge of representing the semantic navigation instructions in two different ways. In the first scenario, the selected landmarks were visualized as pictograms, while in the second scenario, an axonometric-based design philosophy for the depiction of landmarks was followed. The third scenario was based on the benchmark approach (metric-based routing instructions) for conveying routing instructions to the users. The experiment showed that the implementation of the ILNM was feasible, and, more importantly, it was beneficial in terms of participants’ navigation performance during the wayfinding experiment, compared to the metric-based instructions scenario (benchmark for indoor navigation). Valuable results were also obtained, concerning the most suitable cartographic approach for visualizing the selected landmarks, while implementing this specific algorithm (ILNM). Finally, our findings confirm that the existence of landmarks, not only within the routing instructions, but also as cartographic representations on the route map itself, can significantly help users to position themselves correctly within an unfamiliar environment and to improve their navigation performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactive 3D Cartography)
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Open AccessArticle
Virtual Reality in Cartography: Immersive 3D Visualization of the Arctic Clyde Inlet (Canada) Using Digital Elevation Models and Bathymetric Data
Multimodal Technologies Interact. 2019, 3(1), 9; https://doi.org/10.3390/mti3010009 - 20 Feb 2019
Cited by 8
Abstract
Due to rapid technological development, virtual reality (VR) is becoming an accessible and important tool for many applications in science, industry, and economy. Being immersed in a 3D environment offers numerous advantages especially for the presentation of geographical data that is usually depicted [...] Read more.
Due to rapid technological development, virtual reality (VR) is becoming an accessible and important tool for many applications in science, industry, and economy. Being immersed in a 3D environment offers numerous advantages especially for the presentation of geographical data that is usually depicted in 2D maps or pseudo 3D models on the monitor screen. This study investigated advantages, limitations, and possible applications for immersive and intuitive 3D terrain visualizations in VR. Additionally, in view of ever-increasing data volumes, this study developed a workflow to present large scale terrain datasets in VR for current mid-end computers. The developed immersive VR application depicts the Arctic fjord Clyde Inlet in its 160 km × 80 km dimensions at 5 m spatial resolution. Techniques, such as level of detail algorithms, tiling, and level streaming, were applied to run the more than one gigabyte large dataset at an acceptable frame rate. The immersive VR application offered the possibility to explore the terrain with or without water surface by various modes of locomotion. Terrain textures could also be altered and measurements conducted to receive necessary information for further terrain analysis. The potential of VR was assessed in a user survey of persons from six different professions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Interactive 3D Cartography)
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