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Special Issue "Nanomaterials for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049). This special issue belongs to the section "Nanochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Alejandro Baeza

Materials and Aeroespatial Production Department, Polymer Materials Research Group, Madrid, 28040, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanomedicine; stimuli-responsive drug nanocarriers; nanooncology; nanomotors for clinical diagnosis; nanomaterials; development of targeting moieties based on synthetic small molecules for antitumoral therapy; protein encapsulation; polymeric nanocapsules for protein delivery in medicine; nanorobots
Guest Editor
Dr. Fernando Novio

1. Catalan Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology (ICN2), CSIC and BIST, Campus UAB, Bellaterra, 08193 Barcelona, Spain;
2. Departament de Química, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Cerdanyola del Vallès, Barcelona, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: nanomedicine; nanoparticles; nanomaterials; drug delivery; bioimaging; nanostructured coordination polymers for biomedical applications; synthesis and characterization of hybrid nanoparticles; polymeric nanoparticles, novel strategies for cancer therapy; theranostics
Guest Editor
Dr. Juan Luis Paris

Department of Life Sciences, Nano4Health Unit, Nanomedicine Group. International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL). Av. Mestre José Veiga s/n, 4715-330 Braga – Portugal
E-Mail
Interests: nanomedicine; liposomes; gene transfection; microfluidics; drug delivery; stimuli-responsive nanodevices

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanotechnology has become a powerful weapon in the fight against cancer. The development of precisely engineered nanoparticles able to overcome biological barriers, specifically recognize and destroy a single type of cancer cell, and accumulate preferentially in tumours, offers a new and potent arsenal to oncologists. Inorganic and organic (or polymeric) nanoparticles have been widely explored for therapeutic and diagnostic applications in cancer treatment. Normally, single nanoparticles are often used and functionalized with organic or polymeric ligands to improve their stability, biocompatibility, and functionality. While individual nanoparticles are no doubt exciting, ensemble of interacting nanoparticles can exhibit a rich variety of novel and extremely useful collective properties that can be radically different from their individual characteristics. These new synergistic properties are originated from coupling interactions in the ensemble of nanoparticles. It is, therefore, expected that the ability to design hybrid structures with tailored spatial arrangements of nanoparticles may facilitate the utilization of nanoparticles in biomedical applications. Recent advances in nanomedicine raise exciting possibilities for future nanoparticle applications in personalized cancer therapy, and new strategies for building hybrid nanostructures are offering interesting platforms, such as effective multimodality cancer imaging (i.e., photothermal, photoacoustic, and magnetic resonance imaging) and combinational cancer therapy (i.e., photothermal ablation of tumors, photodynamic therapy, and targeted delivery-based chemotherapy).

In this Special Issue, we invite investigators to contribute original research articles as well as review articles that are related to the application of hybrid nanoparticles as multifunctional platforms in the treatment and early diagnosis of cancer. We are particularly interested in research directed toward improving the effectivity and selectivity properties of different nanoparticles for treatment or bioimaging purposes. Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Theranostic nanoparticles for cancer treatment
  • Nanoparticles as contrast agents for bioimaging
  • Nanoparticles as biosensors
  • Novel therapies based on nanomaterials for cancer treatment and diagnosis
  • Clinical studies and therapeutic and diagnostic efficacy of anti-cancer nanoparticles
  • Biocompatibility and toxicity studies of nanoparticles for cancer treatment.

Dr. Alejandro Baeza
Dr. Fernando Novio
Dr. Juan Luis Paris
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Nanotechnology
  • hybrid nanoparticles
  • theranostics
  • cancer therapy
  • biocompatibility
  • Imaging
  • drug delivery
  • clinical trials
  • toxicology
  • detection
  • screening
  • targeting moieties

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Size-Dependent Biological Effects of Quercetin Nanocrystals
Molecules 2019, 24(7), 1438; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24071438
Received: 25 February 2019 / Revised: 10 April 2019 / Accepted: 11 April 2019 / Published: 11 April 2019
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Abstract
Quercetin (QE) is an attractive natural compound for cancer prevention due to its beneficial anti-oxidative and anti-proliferative effects. However, QE is poorly soluble in water and slightly soluble in oil, which results in its low oral bioavailability and limits its application in the [...] Read more.
Quercetin (QE) is an attractive natural compound for cancer prevention due to its beneficial anti-oxidative and anti-proliferative effects. However, QE is poorly soluble in water and slightly soluble in oil, which results in its low oral bioavailability and limits its application in the clinic. The aim of this study was to prepare QE nanocrystals (QE-NCs) with improved solubility and high drug loading, furthermore, the size-dependent anti-cancer effects of QE-NCs were studied. We prepared QE-NCs with three different particle sizes by wet milling, then, cell proliferation, migration and invasion were studied in A549 cells. The QE-NCs had antitumor effects in a dose- and size-dependent manner. Compared with the large particles, the small particles had a strong inhibitory impact on cell biological effects (p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). Moreover, Western blot assay indicated that QE-NCs may inhibit the migration and invasion of A549 cells by inhibiting the STAT3 signaling pathway, and the particle size may have an effect on this process. In this study, it was proven that NCs could dramatically enhance the anticancer efficacy of QE at the cellular level. In addition, particle size had a considerable influence on the dissolution behavior and antitumor effects of NCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy)
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Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle Nanoformulation of a Novel Pyrano[2,3-c] Pyrazole Heterocyclic Compound AMDPC Exhibits Anti-Cancer Activity via Blocking the Cell Cycle through a P53-Independent Pathway
Molecules 2019, 24(3), 624; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24030624
Received: 12 January 2019 / Revised: 2 February 2019 / Accepted: 6 February 2019 / Published: 11 February 2019
PDF Full-text (3804 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Pyrano[2,3-c]pyrazole derivatives have been reported as exerting various biological activities. One compound with potential anti-tumor activity was screened out by MTT assay from series of dihydropyrazopyrazole derivatives we had synthesized before using a one-pot, four-component reaction, and was named as 6-amino-4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-3-methyl-1,4-dihydropyrano[2,3-c]pyrazole-5-carbonitrile (hereinafter abbreviated [...] Read more.
Pyrano[2,3-c]pyrazole derivatives have been reported as exerting various biological activities. One compound with potential anti-tumor activity was screened out by MTT assay from series of dihydropyrazopyrazole derivatives we had synthesized before using a one-pot, four-component reaction, and was named as 6-amino-4-(2-hydroxyphenyl)-3-methyl-1,4-dihydropyrano[2,3-c]pyrazole-5-carbonitrile (hereinafter abbreviated as AMDPC). The IC50 of AMDPC against Bcap-37 breast cancer cells was 46.52 μg/mL. Then the hydrophobic AMDPC was encapsulated in PEG-PLGA block copolymers, and then self-assembled as polymeric micelle (mPEG-PLGA/AMDPC) to improve both physiochemical and release profiles. The effect of mPEG-PLGA/AMDPC on BCAP-37 cancer cells showed similar anti-tumor effects as AMDPC. Furthermore, the anti-tumor mechanism of mPEG-PLGA/AMDPC was investigated, which can probably be attributed to stimulating the expression of P21 gene and therefore protein production on BCAP-37 cells, and then blocked the cell cycle through the P53-independent pathway both in S phase and G2 phase. Thus, mPEG-PLGA/AMDPC is a promising therapeutic agent for cancer treatment, and further in vivo studies will be developed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanomaterials for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy)
Figures

Graphical abstract

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