molecules-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "1st CQE Days Meeting: 44 Years Connecting People and Chemistry"

A special issue of Molecules (ISSN 1420-3049).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nuno Neng
Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Centro de Química Estrutural, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: sample preparation; microextraction techniques; analytical method development and validation; environmental and biological analysis; chromatography and hyphenated techniques
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Tânia S. Morais
Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Química Estrutural, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: organometallic/inorganic chemistry; peptide chemistry; metal-peptide conjugates; interaction studies with biomolecules; anti-cancer drug design and development; drug delivery; medicinal chemistry
Dr. Marta M. Alves
Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Química Estrutural, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: metallic biomaterials; in vitro degradation; bioactive coatings
Dr. Ana Paula C. Ribeiro
Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Química Estrutural, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: nanomaterials; sustainable catalysis; thermophysical properties; ionic liquids; deep eutectic solvents and supercritical fluids
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Gonçalo J. Justino

Guest Editor
Centro de Química Estrutural, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: drug design; drug metabolism; protein biochemistry; molecular dynamics; mass spectrometry
Dr. Karina Shimizu

Guest Editor
Centro de Química Estrutural, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: ionic liquids; molecular dynamics simulations; ab initio calculations; nanoscience; thermodynamics; physical organic chemistry
Dr. Carlos Eduardo Sabino Bernardes
Website
Guest Editor
Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, Lisbon, Portugal
Interests: molecular dynamics; nucleation; polymorphism; active pharmaceutical ingredients; crystallization; calorimetry; instrumentation; ionic liquids
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Ms. Luciana Silva

Guest Editor
Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Centro de Química Estrutural, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: organic synthesis; natural products; drug development; carbohydrates chemistry

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The Centro de Química Estrutural (CQE) is one of the oldest chemical research units in Portugal. It is recognized as one of the best of European research centers, with collaborations established with the top research centers and universities across Europe, the USA, and Japan, just to mention some.

This Special Issue will cover the research performed at Centro de Química Estrutural (CQE) mostly during the 1st edition of the CQE Days meeting, with the intent of sharing information about the research work carried.

With this Special Issue, it is intended for emphasis to be placed on the cooperation with industry or other academic partners. The list of topics is not confined to what is presented in the meeting, and manuscripts discussing advances in methodologies and effects on chemical or biological processes, including experimental, computational, and/or simulation studies are welcomed. Synthesis, catalysis, materials, nanochemistry, chemistry for the environment, energy, and medicinal and biological studies are topics of interest to this issue.

Dr. Nuno Neng
Dr. Tânia S. Morais
Dr. Marta M. Alves
Dr. Ana Paula C. Ribeiro
Dr. Gonçalo J. Justino
Dr. Karina Shimizu
Dr. Carlos E. S. Bernardes
Ms. Luciana Silva
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Molecules is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Synthesis, catalysis and reactivity
  • Materials, soft matter, and nanochemistry
  • Sustainable chemistry for the environment, energy, and manufacturing
  • Medicinal and biological chemistry for health

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
A Comparison of Different Approaches to Quantify Nitric Oxide Release from NO-Releasing Materials in Relevant Biological Media
Molecules 2020, 25(11), 2580; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25112580 (registering DOI) - 02 Jun 2020
Abstract
The development of solid materials that deliver nitric oxide (NO) are of interest for several therapeutic applications. Nevertheless, due to NO’s reactive nature, rapid diffusion and short half-life, reporting their NO delivery characteristics is rather complex. The full knowledge of this parameter is [...] Read more.
The development of solid materials that deliver nitric oxide (NO) are of interest for several therapeutic applications. Nevertheless, due to NO’s reactive nature, rapid diffusion and short half-life, reporting their NO delivery characteristics is rather complex. The full knowledge of this parameter is fundamental to discuss the therapeutic utility of these materials, and thus, the NO quantification strategy must be carefully considered according to the NO-releasing scaffold type, to the expected NO-releasing amounts and to the medium of quantification. In this work, we explore and discuss three different ways of quantifying the release of NO in different biological fluids: haemoglobin assay, Griess assay and NO electrochemical detection. For these measurements, different porous materials, namely zeolites and titanosilicates were used as models for NO-releasing platforms. The oxyhaemoglobin assay offers great sensitivity (nanomolar levels), but it is only possible to monitor the NO release while oxyhaemoglobin is not fully converted. On the other hand, Griess assay has low sensitivity in complex biological media, namely in blood, and interferences with media make NO measurements questionable. Nevertheless, this method can measure micromolar amounts of NO and may be useful for an initial screening for long-term release performance. The electrochemical sensor enabled real-time measurements in a variety of biological settings. However, measured NO is critically low in oxygenated and complex media, giving transient signals, which makes long-term quantification impossible. Despite the disadvantages of each method, the combination of all the results provided a more comprehensive NO release profile for these materials, which will help to determine which formulations are most promising for specific therapeutic applications. This study highlights the importance of using appropriate NO quantification tools to provide accurate reports. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 1st CQE Days Meeting: 44 Years Connecting People and Chemistry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Bioactivity of Isostructural Hydrogen Bonding Frameworks Built from Pipemidic Acid Metal Complexes
Molecules 2020, 25(10), 2374; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25102374 - 20 May 2020
Abstract
We report herein three novel complexes whose design was based on the approach that consists of combining commercially available antibiotics with metals to attain different physicochemical properties and promote antimicrobial activity. Thus, new isostructural three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen bonding frameworks of pipemidic acid with [...] Read more.
We report herein three novel complexes whose design was based on the approach that consists of combining commercially available antibiotics with metals to attain different physicochemical properties and promote antimicrobial activity. Thus, new isostructural three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen bonding frameworks of pipemidic acid with manganese (II), zinc (II) and calcium (II) have been synthesised by mechanochemistry and are stable under shelf conditions. Notably, the antimicrobial activity of the compounds is maintained or even increased; in particular, the activity of the complexes is augmented against Escherichia coli, a representative of Gram-negative bacteria that have emerged as a major concern in drug resistance. Moreover, the synthesised compounds display similar general toxicity (Artemia salina model) levels to the original antibiotic, pipemidic acid. The increased antibacterial activity of the synthesised compounds, together with their appropriate toxicity levels, are promising outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 1st CQE Days Meeting: 44 Years Connecting People and Chemistry)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Bar Adsorptive Microextraction Coated with Carbon-Based Phase Mixtures for Performance-Enhancement to Monitor Selected Benzotriazoles, Benzothiazoles, and Benzenesulfonamides in Environmental Water Matrices
Molecules 2020, 25(9), 2133; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25092133 - 02 May 2020
Abstract
In the present work we propose, for the first time, bar adsorptive microextraction coated with carbon-based phase mixtures, followed by microliquid desorption and high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (BAμE-μLD/HPLC-DAD) analysis, to enhance the performance of the determination of traces of benzotriazoles (BTRs), [...] Read more.
In the present work we propose, for the first time, bar adsorptive microextraction coated with carbon-based phase mixtures, followed by microliquid desorption and high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (BAμE-μLD/HPLC-DAD) analysis, to enhance the performance of the determination of traces of benzotriazoles (BTRs), benzothiazoles (BTs), and benzenesulfonamide derivatives (BSDs) in environmental water matrices. Assessing six carbon-based sorbents (CA1, CN1, B test EUR, SX PLUS, SX 1, and R) with different selectivity properties allowed us to tailor the best phase mixture (R, 12.5%/CN1, 87.5%) that has convenient porosity, texture, and surface chemistry (pHPZC,mix ~6.5) for trace analysis of benzenesulfonamide, 1-hydroxybenzotriazole, 1H-benzotriazole, 5-methyl-1H-benzotriazole, benzothiazole, and 1,3-benzothiazol-2-ol chemicals in aqueous media. Optimized experimental conditions provided average recoveries ranging from 37.9% to 59.2%, appropriate linear dynamic ranges (5.0 to 120.0 µg L−1; r2 ≥ 0.9964), limits of detection between 1.0 and 1.4 μg L−1, and good precisions (relative standard deviation (RSD) ≤ 9.3%). The proposed methodology (BAμE(R, 12.5%/CN1, 87.5%)-μLD/HPLC-DAD) also proved to be a suitable sorption-based static microextraction alternative to monitor traces of BTRs, BTs, and BSDs in rain, waste, tap, and estuarine water samples. From the data obtained, the proposed approach showed that the BAμE technique with the addition of lab-made devices allows users to adapt the technique to use sorbents or mixtures of sorbents with the best selectivity characteristics whenever distinct classes of target analytes occur simultaneously in the same application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 1st CQE Days Meeting: 44 Years Connecting People and Chemistry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
A New Family of Iron(II)-Cyclopentadienyl Compounds Shows Strong Activity against Colorectal and Triple Negative Breast Cancer Cells
Molecules 2020, 25(7), 1592; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25071592 - 30 Mar 2020
Abstract
A family of compounds with the general formula [Fe(η5-C5H5)(CO)(PPh3)(NCR)]+ has been synthesized (NCR = benzonitrile (1); 4-hydroxybenzonitrile (2); 4-hydroxymethylbenzonitrile (3); 4-aminobenzonitrile (4); 4-bromobenzonitrile (5); [...] Read more.
A family of compounds with the general formula [Fe(η5-C5H5)(CO)(PPh3)(NCR)]+ has been synthesized (NCR = benzonitrile (1); 4-hydroxybenzonitrile (2); 4-hydroxymethylbenzonitrile (3); 4-aminobenzonitrile (4); 4-bromobenzonitrile (5); and, 4-chlorocinnamonitrile (6)). All of the compounds were obtained in good yields and were completely characterized by standard spectroscopic and analytical techniques. Compounds 1, 4, and 5 crystallize in the monoclinc P21/c space group and packing is determined by short contacts between the phosphane phenyl rings and cyclopentadienyl (compounds 1 and 4) or π-π lateral interactions between the benzonitrile molecules (complex 5). DFT and TD-DFT calculations were performed to help in the interpretation of the experimental UV-Vis. data and assign the electronic transitions. Cytotoxicity studies in MDA-MB-231 breast and SW480 colorectal cancer-derived cell lines showed IC50 values at a low micromolar range for all of the compounds in both cell lines. The determination of the selectivity index for colorectal cells (SW480 vs. NCM460, a normal colon-derived cell line) indicates that the compounds have some inherent selectivity. Further studies on the SW480 cell line demonstrated that the compounds induce cell death by apoptosis, inhibit proliferation by inhibiting the formation of colonies, and affect the actin-cytoskeleton of the cells. These results are not observed for the hydroxylated compounds 2 and 3, where an alternative mode of action might be present. Overall, the results indicate that the substituent at the nitrile-based ligand is associated to the biological activity of the compounds. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 1st CQE Days Meeting: 44 Years Connecting People and Chemistry)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop