Special Issue "The Universal Application of Clay Minerals"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystallography and Physical Chemistry of Minerals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Francisco Franco
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Universidad de Malaga, Malaga, Spain
Interests: kaolin; smectite group of minerals; sepiolite; palygorskite; pelotherapy; advanced, clay-based materials; pharmaceutical uses of adsorption processes; new technologies
Dr. Juan Antonio Cecilia
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Cristalografía y Mineralogía, Spain
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; biomass valorization; heterogeneous catalysis; porous materials; clay minerals; adsorption processes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Minerals will publish a Special Issue entitled ‘’The Universal Application of Clay Minerals’’. Clay minerals are ubiquitous on the Earth’s surface and their applications date back to the beginning of humanity. They cover a very wide range of topics including industries engineering, the pharmaceutical industry, the adsorption of a wide variety of pollutants such as organic pollutants, heavy metals, and radionuclides, and many more. Moreover, it well known that all of them are related to factors such as the structure and chemical composition of clay minerals but also to other physical and chemical properties such as the area and the nature of its inner and external surfaces. In addition, all these physical properties can be improved with advanced clay-based materials by improving the performance of traditional applications that are used in new applications. This Special Issue will collect articles summarizing the traditional applications of clay minerals while paying special attention to those new applications developed with advanced clay-based materials.

Prof. Dr. Francisco Franco
Dr. Juan Antonio Cecilia
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • kaolin
  • smectite group of minerals
  • sepiolite
  • palygorskite
  • pelotherapy
  • advanced, clay-based materials
  • pharmaceutical uses of adsorption processes
  • new technologies

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Molecular Modeling of Ammonia Gas Adsorption onto the Kaolinite Surface with DFT Study
Minerals 2020, 10(1), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/min10010046 - 02 Jan 2020
Abstract
With high porosity and being one of the most abundant clay minerals, dried kaolinite may be an excellent adsorbent to remove ammonia gas (NH3). Here, the plane wave pseudopotential method based on density functional theory (DFT) was used to explore the [...] Read more.
With high porosity and being one of the most abundant clay minerals, dried kaolinite may be an excellent adsorbent to remove ammonia gas (NH3). Here, the plane wave pseudopotential method based on density functional theory (DFT) was used to explore the mechanism of ammonia gas adsorption on the dried kaolinite, the Mulliken electric charge, and the partial density of states of atoms of the NH3/kaolinite (001) system. NH3 adsorption on kaolinite can happen in three different type adsorption positions: “top”, “bridge” and “hollow”. The “hollow” position is enclosed by two "upright" hydroxyl groups perpendicular to the (001) surface of kaolinite and a "lying" hydroxyl group parallel to the surface. At this position, the adsorption is the most stable and has the highest adsorption energy. The nitrogen atom of the NH3 molecule bonds with the hydrogen atom in the "upright" hydroxyl group on the (001) surface and its hydrogen atom forms HN…O hydrogen bond with oxygen atom in the "lying" hydroxyl group, which leads to the NH3 stably adsorbed on kaolinite (001) surface. A small part of electrons transfer between NH3 molecules and kaolinite creates weakly electrostatic adsorption between them. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Universal Application of Clay Minerals)
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Open AccessArticle
Mechanochemical Preparation of Slow Release Fertilizer Based on Glauconite–Urea Complexes
Minerals 2019, 9(9), 507; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9090507 - 23 Aug 2019
Abstract
We investigated the mechanochemical synthesis of complex slow release fertilizers (SRF) derived from glauconite. We studied the effectiveness of the mechanical intercalation of urea into glauconite using planetary and ring mills. The potassium-nitric complex SRFs were synthesized via a mechanochemical method mixing glauconite [...] Read more.
We investigated the mechanochemical synthesis of complex slow release fertilizers (SRF) derived from glauconite. We studied the effectiveness of the mechanical intercalation of urea into glauconite using planetary and ring mills. The potassium-nitric complex SRFs were synthesized via a mechanochemical method mixing glauconite with urea in a 3:1 ratio. The obtained composites were analyzed using X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray fluorescence analysis, and infrared spectroscopy. The results show that as duration of mechanochemical activation increases, the mineralogical, chemical, and structural characteristics of composites change. Essential modifications associated with a decrease in absorbed urea and the formation of microcrystallites were observed when the planetary milling time increased from 5 to 10 min and the ring milling from 15 to 30 min. Complete intercalation of urea into glauconite was achieved by 20 min grinding in a planetary mill or 60 min in a ring mill. Urea intercalation in glauconite occurs much faster when using a planetary mill compared to a ring mill. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Universal Application of Clay Minerals)
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Open AccessArticle
Variations in the Texture Profile Analysis (TPA) Properties of Clay/Mineral-Medicinal Water Mixtures for Pelotherapy: Effect of Anion Type
Minerals 2019, 9(3), 144; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9030144 - 28 Feb 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
A peloid’s liquid phase can be mineral, sea or salt-lake water. This study examines the interactions among three materials, two special clays (bentonite and sepiolite) and one common clay, and three chemically different mineral-medicinal waters. In all clay–water mixtures, the hardness and adhesiveness [...] Read more.
A peloid’s liquid phase can be mineral, sea or salt-lake water. This study examines the interactions among three materials, two special clays (bentonite and sepiolite) and one common clay, and three chemically different mineral-medicinal waters. In all clay–water mixtures, the hardness and adhesiveness decreased with the amount of water in the mixture. For a given hardness or adhesiveness, sepiolite retained more water than the other clays, especially in the presence of sulphate-rich mineral-medicinal water (73%). In contrast, the common clay retained the least amount of water (26%), and the bentonite samples returned an intermediate value for the amount of retained water (52–53%). These differences had a strong influence on the thermal behaviour of the mixtures and, hence, should be taken into account for their use in thermotherapy applications. There were no significant differences in the instrumental texture of the clay pastes according to the predominant anion in the mineral-medicinal waters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Universal Application of Clay Minerals)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
CO2 Adsorption of Materials Synthesized from Clay Minerals: A Review
Minerals 2019, 9(9), 514; https://doi.org/10.3390/min9090514 - 26 Aug 2019
Abstract
The aim of this work is to make a brief review of the adsorption of CO2 on modified clay minerals. Previous researchers have used different clay modifications, either by making changes in the structure by a reaction with another product or by [...] Read more.
The aim of this work is to make a brief review of the adsorption of CO2 on modified clay minerals. Previous researchers have used different clay modifications, either by making changes in the structure by a reaction with another product or by the addition of a catalyst to improve their CO2 adsorption capacity. In order to obtain high values of CO2 uptake, some researchers have been incorporated amines-speices such as (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES), tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) and a branched polyethylenimine (PEI) by grafting or impregnation. The synthesis of an adsorbent from mineral clays can generate an increase in its porosity and in its textural properties. These investigations differ in a number of factors such as the kind of clay, the operating conditions, y and the nature of the impregnated compound. The role of these factors in the CO2 adsorption capacity will be considered in detail in this review. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Universal Application of Clay Minerals)
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