Accessory Minerals in Earth Sciences: Contemporary Trends

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Mineral Geochemistry and Geochronology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2021) | Viewed by 6888

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Silesia in Katowice, 41-200 Katowice, Poland
Interests: U-Pb accessory minerals dating; CHIME application to detrital monazite; heavy mineral characterization and paleoreconstruction of the source area; tektite and impactite characterization
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Guest Editor
Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety, Government of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6004, Australia
Interests: regional-scale mineral systems and tectonics; trace element and isotope chemistry of major and accessory mineral phases; geochronology; dating of mineral deposits using accessory phosphate minerals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Silesia in Katowice, 41-200 Katowice, Poland
Interests: large igneous provinces; dykes, sills, and flood basalts; U-Pb geochronology of various accessory mineral phases in mafic rocks; paleomagnetism of mafic rocks; paleogeography and environmental change, with a focus specifically on the Precambrian

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Silesia in Katowice, 41-200 Katowice, Poland
Interests: heavy mineral analysis (HMA) in paleogeographic reconstructions of sedimentary ore formation; heavy metal pollution; their migration and secondary phases crystallization; XRD method in the phase composition determination of various materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

An accessory mineral is defined as a mineral that typically makes up no more than 1% of a rock. It does not necessarily indicate one particular mineral species, as thousands of minerals could potentially fall under that definition. However, only a very limited number are found in high abundance. Additionally, many accessory mineral phases are sensitive recorders for pre-, syn- and post-formational processes. They can also be indicators for the behavior of specific elements, especially trace elements. Usually, they are complex in terms of their chemical and isotopic composition, and their structural state as well.

State-of-the-art research in Earth sciences is increasingly being driven by new progress in analytical capabilities. The development of sophisticated and sensitive equipment, such as mass spectrometry, has led to the adoption of techniques that deploy either a single accessory mineral and have become standard techniques because of their relative ease of operation, and the rapid production of data, i.e., the use of laser ablation–inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry toward detrital zircon provenance studies. The study of accessory minerals has thus increased exponentially during the past twenty years and is ever increasing. Highly specialized and advanced techniques of analyses with increasing resolution and precision, both on separated mineral phases and in situ, make them powerful tools for different fields of the Earth sciences, from U-Pb geochronology to provenance studies, petrochronology, petrology, etc.

Dr. Simon Johnson
Dr. Krzysztof Szopa
Dr. Ashley Gumsley
Dr. Tomasz Krzykawski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • geochronology
  • U-Pb dating
  • trace elements
  • REEs
  • accessories
  • petrology

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

29 pages, 25550 KiB  
Article
Garnet as Indicator of Pegmatite Evolution: The Case Study of Pegmatites from the Oxford Pegmatite Field (Maine, USA)
by Lorena Hernández-Filiberto, Encarnación Roda-Robles, William B. Simmons and Karen L. Webber
Minerals 2021, 11(8), 802; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11080802 - 23 Jul 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 5820
Abstract
Almandine-spessartine garnets, from the Oxford County pegmatites and the Palermo No. 1 pegmatite, record significant compositional variations according to the degree of evolution of their hosting rock. Garnets from the most fractionated pegmatites (Mt. Mica, Berry-Havey, and Emmons) show the highest Mn, Nb, [...] Read more.
Almandine-spessartine garnets, from the Oxford County pegmatites and the Palermo No. 1 pegmatite, record significant compositional variations according to the degree of evolution of their hosting rock. Garnets from the most fractionated pegmatites (Mt. Mica, Berry-Havey, and Emmons) show the highest Mn, Nb, Ta, Zr, and Hf values, followed by those from the intermediate grade pegmatites (Palermo No. 1) and, finally, garnets from the barren pegmatites show the lowest values (Perham and Stop-35). Iron, Ca, and Mg contents follow an inverse order, with the highest contents in the latter pegmatites. Major element zoning shows increasing Mn values from core to rim in most garnet samples, while trace element zoning is not systematic except for some crystals which show a core to rim depletion for most of these elements. Chondrite normalized HREE (Heavy Rare Earth Elements) spectra show positive slopes for garnets from barren pegmatites, both positive and negative slopes for those associated with the intermediate pegmatite, and negative or flat slopes in garnets from the highly fractionated pegmatites. Ion exchange mechanisms, including Fe2+−1Mn2+1, (Fe2+, Mn2+)−1Si−1Li1P1; and, (Y, Ho3+)2(vac)1(Fe2+, Mn2+)−3, could explain most of the compositional variations observed in these garnets. These compositional variations are the reflection of the composition of the pegmatitic magma (barren pegmatites originate from a more ferromagnesian magma than fractionated pegmatites); and of the coexisting mineral phases competing with garnets to host certain chemical elements, such as biotite, schorl, plagioclase, apatite, Fe-Mn phosphates, Nb-Ta oxides, zircon, xenotime, and monazite. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Accessory Minerals in Earth Sciences: Contemporary Trends)
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