Special Issue "Advances in Bioremediation and Biomining Research"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X). This special issue belongs to the section "Biomineralization and Biominerals".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 19 August 2022 | Viewed by 1625

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Oliver Wiche
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute for Biosciences, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Freiberg, Germany
Interests: soil chemistry; geochemistry; environmental analysis; plant ecophysiology
Dr. Manfred Sager
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Bio Forschung Austria, 1220 Vienna, Austria
Interests: trace elements (heavy metals, platinum metals, rare earths); phosphorus; iodine—occurrence and analysis; environmental mobility and speciation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Soil pollution is a global threat that mostly derives from human activities such as poor waste management, unsustainable farming practices, mining, and ore processing. Bioremediation and biomining techniques comprise a number of cost-effective and environmentally friendly plant- and microbial-assisted technologies for the in situ restoration of the health and productive capacity of soils, the mitigation of the environmental impacts of impaired soils, and last but not least, the recovery of economically valuable metal(oid)s from plant biomass or leachates. General approaches in bioremediation and biomining include the uptake and accumulation of elements in plants, the stabilization of pollutants in the soil, and the microbe-assisted leaching and degradation of pollutants and valuable elements. Progress in this field requires a sound understanding of substrate-, plant-, and microbe-associated factors governing the solubility, bioavailability, and removal of target compounds. This Special Issue aims to bring together contributions of all aspects of bioremediation and biomining research including (but not limited to) laboratory and field research related to i) plant–soil–microbe relationships controlling the mobility, chemical speciation, and plant uptake of pollutants and economically valuable metal(oid)s; ii) the microbe-assisted degradation and leaching of pollutants and metal(oid)s; and iii) the final recovery of raw materials from plant biomass or leachates.  

Dr. Oliver Wiche
Dr. Manfred Sager
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • phytoextraction
  • phytostabilization
  • metal(oid)s
  • soil pollution
  • soil bioengineering

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Field Studies on the Effect of Bioaugmentation with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 on Plant Accumulation of Rare Earth Elements and Selected Trace Elements
Minerals 2022, 12(4), 409; https://doi.org/10.3390/min12040409 - 25 Mar 2022
Viewed by 576
Abstract
This study is an investigation of the effect of soil bioaugmentation (inoculation) on a field scale with the commercially available product RhizoVital®42, containing Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB4, on element bioavailability, plant biomass production, as well as accumulation of rare earth elements (REEs), [...] Read more.
This study is an investigation of the effect of soil bioaugmentation (inoculation) on a field scale with the commercially available product RhizoVital®42, containing Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB4, on element bioavailability, plant biomass production, as well as accumulation of rare earth elements (REEs), germanium, and selected trace elements. Zea mays and Helianthus annuus were selected as test plants. Post-harvest, results showed inoculation increased biomass production of Z. mays and H. annuus by 24% and 26%, albeit insignificant at p ≤ 0.05. Bioaugmentation enhanced Z. mays shoot content of P, Cd, and Ge by percentages between 73% and 80% (significant only for Ge) and decreased shoot content of REET, Pb, and Cu by 28%, 35%, and 59%, respectively. For H. annuus grown on bioaugmented soil, shoot content of Ca, Cu, Ge, REET, and Pb increased by over 40%, with a negligible decrease observed for Cd. Summarily, results suggest that bioaugmentation with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 could enhance biomass production, increase soil element bioavailability enhance, and increase or reduce plant accumulation of target elements. Additionally, differences in P use efficiency could influence bioaugmentation effects on P accumulation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bioremediation and Biomining Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Investigations on Strategic Element Recovery by an Underground Membrane Pilot Plant from In-Situ Extracted Bioleaching Solutions
Minerals 2022, 12(1), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/min12010046 - 29 Dec 2021
Viewed by 413
Abstract
Focusing on the selective extraction of the critical raw materials indium and germanium from real bioleaching solutions, extended studies have been carried out using Europe’s first underground hybrid membrane pilot plant (TRL6). In order to transfer former laboratory experiments to pilot scale, NF99 [...] Read more.
Focusing on the selective extraction of the critical raw materials indium and germanium from real bioleaching solutions, extended studies have been carried out using Europe’s first underground hybrid membrane pilot plant (TRL6). In order to transfer former laboratory experiments to pilot scale, NF99 (Alfa Laval) was used for the evaluation of membrane permeance and ion retention. A performance test of microfiltration (MF) and nanofiltration (NF) showed high permeances with low root-mean-square deviation under feed variation (5.2% for MF, 4.7% for NF). Depending on the feed load, a significant permeance drop of up to 57% for MF (3 bar) and 26% for NF (10 bar, 1.1 m s−1) was observed. The NF retention performance showed that, without regular chemical cleaning, the selectivity between the target elements degraded. By introducing acidic-basic cleaning steps, it was possible to keep the retention behavior at an approximately constant level (In 91.0 ± 1.3%; Ge 18.2 ± 5.5%). In relation to the specified target, the best results could be achieved at low pressure (7.5 bar) and a maximum overflow velocity of 1.1 m s−1, with a retention of 88.4% for indium and 8.8% for germanium. Moreover, the investigations proved the functionality and long-term stability of the underground membrane device. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Bioremediation and Biomining Research)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop