Special Issue "Selected Papers from the 3rd European Mineralogical Conference: Mineralogy in the Modern World"

A special issue of Minerals (ISSN 2075-163X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2022) | Viewed by 1953

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Justyna Topolska
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mineralogy, Petrography and Geochemistry, AGH University of Science and Technology, 30-059 Kraków, Poland
Interests: apatites; minerals thermodynamics; minerals solubility; heavy and trace metals immobilization by minerals; apatites synthesis and structures; human teeth and bones
Dr. Krzysztof Szopa
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Natural Sciences, University of Silesia in Katowice, 41-200 Katowice, Poland
Interests: U-Pb accessory minerals dating; CHIME application to detrital monazite; heavy mineral characterization and paleoreconstruction of the source area; tektite and impactite characterization
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The leading theme of the 3rd European Mineralogical Conference (EMC2020) “Mineralogy in the Modern World” will serve as a platform for the exchange of ideas and approaches toward solving scientific problems in the realm of mineralogy related sciences, and we hope that this meeting will start new prospective collaborations. Thanks to the involvement of members from the various European mineralogical societies, a wide range of scientific sessions has been prepared. The main themes of the conference include:

  • Applied mineralogy
  • Archaeometry, care and preservation
  • Atomistic and thermodynamic modelling
  • Education and mineralogy
  • Environmental mineralogy and low T geochemistry
  • Experimental mineralogy and petrology
  • Geobiochemistry , Geomicrobiology and Biomineralogy
  • Geochronology
  • Magmatism and volcanology
  • Mantle petrology and geochemistry
  • Metamorphism
  • Mineral deposits and raw materials
  • Mineral diversity and evolution
  • Mineral physics
  • Mineralogical crystallography
  • Planetary materials and processes

The research results presented at the conference may be published in this Special Issue of Minerals. All the accepted articles will be published in full open access format. To all that are joining us at the conference, please do not miss out on this the opportunity to submit your full paper to the Special Issue.

Dr. Justyna Topolska
Dr. Krzysztof Szopa
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Minerals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Chemical Diversity of Teeth and Bone Fragments from a Newly Discovered Upper Muschelkalk Bone Bed from Silesia, Poland
Minerals 2022, 12(4), 469; https://doi.org/10.3390/min12040469 - 12 Apr 2022
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Abstract
The new exposure of the Upper Muschelkalk clays and dolomites located south of Kalety (Tarnogórski District, Silesia, Poland) provided numerous remains of vertebrates represented by teeth, scales, long bones, and coprolites. Despite the influence of hydrothermal processes leading to dolomitization and Zn-Pb deposit [...] Read more.
The new exposure of the Upper Muschelkalk clays and dolomites located south of Kalety (Tarnogórski District, Silesia, Poland) provided numerous remains of vertebrates represented by teeth, scales, long bones, and coprolites. Despite the influence of hydrothermal processes leading to dolomitization and Zn-Pb deposit formation, the preservation of fossil remains is good. The taxonomic diversity and accumulation of vertebrate debris in the dolomite are similar to other “bone beds” from the Muschelkalk and the Lower Keuper units. The SEM-EDS, EMP-WDS, and XRD analyses confirm that the examined remains consist of hydroxylapatite containing carbonate ions. Most vertebrate teeth as well as some bone fragments show zoning in the BSE imaging. In tooth cross-sections, three or two zones are preserved: (I) the outermost zone, associated with diagenetic mineralization of enameloid apatite, (II) a intermediate zone (orthodentine), and (III) the most porous internal zone (osteodentine). Decreasing P, Ca, Sr in the composition of the apatite which forms successive zones, is visible from the most external to the central part. Selective diagenetic substitution and adsorption of some elements by apatite crystals can allow recognition of the genetic origin of highly damaged or transported fragments scattered in the sedimentary layers. The chemical behavior of bioapatite, from deposition to digenesis, shows its useful role for identification of the formation process and potential, younger changes (e.g., hydrothermal overprint). The X-ray diffraction data, particularly cell parameters “a” and “c”, can determine the degree of crystallinity and/or diagenesis. Moreover, correlation between some elements/ions (e.g., Sr, Ba, Ca, Mg, F, OH) can be helpful for the identification of the fossil type, especially if the bones are small and incomplete. Full article
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Article
Archaeometric Analysis of the Objects from the Scala Santa (Holy Stairs) in the Crypt under the Piarist Church in Cracow (Poland)
Minerals 2021, 11(11), 1179; https://doi.org/10.3390/min11111179 - 25 Oct 2021
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Abstract
Conservators extracted and preserved reliquaries hidden in the steps of the right flight of the Holy Stairs erected in the Piarist church crypt in Cracow (Poland). Three items from among 59 reliquaries were selected for specialist analyses: a framed, transparent cross containing a [...] Read more.
Conservators extracted and preserved reliquaries hidden in the steps of the right flight of the Holy Stairs erected in the Piarist church crypt in Cracow (Poland). Three items from among 59 reliquaries were selected for specialist analyses: a framed, transparent cross containing a particle of the True Cross, and two opaque beads; an ornamented blue one without a hole and a drilled black one were analysed using non-destructive and non-invasive methods. The methods included scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry, Raman microspectroscopy and X-ray diffractometry. The reliquary cross was found to be made of rock crystal and framed with an alloy of gold, silver and probably copper. The beads are made of glass; the blue bead represents forest plant-ash potash–lime glass and the black one, plant-ash soda–lime glass. Cobalt, probably along with copper, was used to produce the colour of the blue bead; manganese and iron ions were used to produce that of the black bead. Lead was present in both beads as one of the minor components and also as a component of corrosion products on their surfaces and probably also as part of the filler for the ornamentation of the blue bead. Nevertheless, it cannot be ruled out that the lead compounds were introduced intentionally to emphasize the bead ornamentation. The possible place and date of manufacture of the artefacts were also discussed. Full article
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