Special Issue "Microstructure, Texture and Properties Control in Alloys"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Roumen Petrov

Department of Electrical Energy, Metals, Mechanical Constructions & Systems,Ghent University, B-9052 Ghent, Belgium
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Interests: thermal and thermo-mechanical processing of metallic materials; microstructural characterization including texture -SEM, EBSD, TEM, XRD; processing-structure-property relationship in metallic materials; damage and fracture
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Leo A.I. Kestens

Metal Science and Technology Group, Ghent University, EEMMeCS Department, B-9052 Ghent, Belgium
Website | E-Mail
Interests: texture control in metal sheet production; crystallographic aspects of metal science; microstructure; scanning electron microscopy; EBSD; electrical steels; advanced high strength steels; aluminium sheet; recrystallization; plastic deformation; structure-properties relations

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Optimization of the microstructure and texture in metals continues to be a significant challenge for industry and academia. This is even more important nowadays when social issues, such as global warming and metal scarcity, are key concerns of current far-reaching policy decisions. An effective way to address these issues is the development of advanced alloys with excellent combinations of properties—weight, strength and ductility. The main objective of this Special Issue of Metals is to facilitate more intense developments in this field of research, and to disseminate these recent developments to industry.

Among the main subjects of interest for this Special Issue are papers focused on: (i) methods for microstructure and texture control in advanced high strength steels, pipeline steels, aluminum, magnesium and titanium alloys, (ii) new (non-conventional) technological approaches for  production of these alloys that will lead to improved mechanical, technological and functional properties, (iii) metal alloy research and developments that relate to texture and anisotropy after conventional and non- conventional treatments; and (iv) application of advanced characterization techniques  for the characterization of damage and fracture.

We truly believe that this issue of Metals will, not only favor networking and international collaboration, but will also help the metals research community to formulate new challenging directions in this exciting field of science and technology.

Prof. Dr. Roumen H. Petrov
Prof. Dr. Leo A.I. Kestens
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Innovative technologies
  • Sheet production
  • Steels
  • Al, Mg, Ti alloys
  • Microstructure
  • Texture
  • Mechanical properties
  • Anisotropy
  • Microstructural aspects of damage and fracture
  • SEM, EBSD, TKD, TEM

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Ultra-Fast Heat Treatment on the Subsequent Formation of Mixed Martensitic/Bainitic Microstructure with Carbides in a CrMo Medium Carbon Steel
Metals 2019, 9(3), 312; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9030312
Received: 5 February 2019 / Revised: 22 February 2019 / Accepted: 4 March 2019 / Published: 10 March 2019
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Abstract
The current work focuses on complex multiphase microstructures gained in CrMo medium carbon steel after ultra-fast heat treatment, consisting of heating with heating rate of 300 °C/s, 2 s soaking at peak temperature and subsequent quenching. In order to better understand the microstructure [...] Read more.
The current work focuses on complex multiphase microstructures gained in CrMo medium carbon steel after ultra-fast heat treatment, consisting of heating with heating rate of 300 °C/s, 2 s soaking at peak temperature and subsequent quenching. In order to better understand the microstructure evolution and the phenomena that take place during rapid heating, an ultra-fast heated sample was analyzed and compared with a conventionally treated sample with a heating rate of 10 °C/s and 360 s soaking. The initial microstructure of both samples consisted of ferrite and spheroidized cementite. The conventional heat treatment results in a fully martensitic microstructure as expected. On the other hand, the ultra-fast heated sample shows significant heterogeneity in the final microstructure. This is a result of insufficient time for cementite dissolution, carbon diffusion and chemical composition homogenization at the austenitization temperature. Its final microstructure consists of undissolved spheroidized cementite, nano-carbides and martensite laths in a ferritic matrix. Based on EBSD and TEM analysis, traces of bainitic ferrite are indicated. The grains and laths sizes observed offer proof that a diffusionless, massive transformation takes place for the austenite formation and growth instead of a diffusion-controlled transformation that occurs on a conventional heat treatment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microstructure, Texture and Properties Control in Alloys)
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Open AccessArticle
Texture Control of Pure Titanium Sheet by the Surface Effect during Phase Transformation
Metals 2018, 8(5), 358; https://doi.org/10.3390/met8050358
Received: 18 April 2018 / Revised: 4 May 2018 / Accepted: 15 May 2018 / Published: 16 May 2018
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Abstract
The texture evolution of cold rolled pure titanium through different annealing parameters was investigated and different processes for various textures controls were proposed for further industrial application. Columnar grains with strong {11–20}//RD (rolling direction) texture was produced through cold rolling and a cooling-controlled [...] Read more.
The texture evolution of cold rolled pure titanium through different annealing parameters was investigated and different processes for various textures controls were proposed for further industrial application. Columnar grains with strong {11–20}//RD (rolling direction) texture was produced through cold rolling and a cooling-controlled annealing at 1100 °C with the Ar atmosphere. The preferred nucleation on the surface and the lowest strain energy of variant pairs during grain growth caused the formation of columnar grains and variant selection. Texture inheritance was discovered both in the cold-rolled and warm rolled-pure titanium sheets following 1000 °C annealing. The stored energy during cold rolling was the main reason causing the texture inheritance. Basal texture could be produced through warm rolling and subsequent annealing. The 30°-rotated around RD from basal texture could be preserved through both recrystallized annealing and transformed annealing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microstructure, Texture and Properties Control in Alloys)
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