Special Issue "Metal Removal and Recycling"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 29 February 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Francisco José Alguacil
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) – National Center for Metallurgical Researcher (CENIM), Madrid, Spain
Interests: metals removal; carbon nano adsorption technology; wastewater purification; hydrometallurgical operations and liquid membranes
Prof. Dr. Felix A. Lopez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) – National Center for Metallurgical Researcher (CENIM), Madrid, Spain
Interests: materials recycling; metals removal; carbon nano adsorption technology; wastewater purification; hydrometallurgical operations
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is impossible to conceive of daily life without the use of metals. For this reason, almost all people consider that metals exist somewhere and that they are easily obtained from any source. The situation is not as friendly as people imagine: some metals are scarce, others are critical, others are obtained from minerals whose deposits are in conflict zones, some of them are dangerous for the environment and health, etc. Therefore, and considering that metals come from exhaustible raw materials, it is necessary to develop efforts to encourage the recycling and reuse of post-consumer products and industrial waste, and also to eliminate those dangerous metals that may damage the environment, considering this in its broadest conception.

This Special Issue of Metals from the MDPI group explores the recovery of existing metals in waste and post-consumer products, with special emphasis on strategic metals (e.g., rare earths), toxic and precious metals, electronic scrap, batteries and scrap metal, among many other wastes and using techniques such as liquid–liquid extraction, electrochemical extraction, selective precipitation, ionic liquids, and many others. We invite you to send your contributions to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Félix A. López
Prof. Dr. Francisco José Alguacil
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Rare earths
  • Precious metals
  • Scrap metal
  • Toxic metals
  • Critical metals
  • Batteries
  • Ionic liquids and applications in smart technologies
  • Selective precipitation
  • Liquid-liquid extraction
  • Electrochemical extraction

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Roasting Pretreatment Combined with Ultrasonic Enhanced Leaching Lead from Electrolytic Manganese Anode Mud
Metals 2019, 9(5), 601; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9050601 - 24 May 2019
Abstract
A method of conventional roasting pretreatment combined with ultrasonic enhanced leaching with ammonium acetate was proposed to solve the difficult problem of lead in electrolytic manganese anode mud. The effects of concentration, liquid–solid ratio, temperature, leaching time and rotating speed on the leaching [...] Read more.
A method of conventional roasting pretreatment combined with ultrasonic enhanced leaching with ammonium acetate was proposed to solve the difficult problem of lead in electrolytic manganese anode mud. The effects of concentration, liquid–solid ratio, temperature, leaching time and rotating speed on the leaching process under conventional and ultrasonic conditions were studied, and the lead leaching rate can be as high as 93.09% under optimized process parameters. A leaching kinetic model under conventional and ultrasonic conditions was established to explore the restrictive links of the leaching process. The results show that the leaching process under both conventional and ultrasonic conditions is controlled by diffusion, and the activation energies are 29.40 kJ/mol and 26.95 kJ/mol for the conventional and ultrasound enhance leaching processes, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Removal and Recycling)
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Open AccessArticle
Modified Leach Residues from Processing Deep-Sea Nodules as Effective Heavy Metals Adsorbents
Metals 2019, 9(4), 472; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9040472 - 23 Apr 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The possible use of leaching residue from leaching deep-sea nodules in SO2/H2SO4/H2O medium as a low-cost adsorbent of heavy metals (Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), As(V)) was studied. The leaching residue was found to be [...] Read more.
The possible use of leaching residue from leaching deep-sea nodules in SO2/H2SO4/H2O medium as a low-cost adsorbent of heavy metals (Pb(II), Cd(II), Cu(II), Ni(II), Co(II), As(V)) was studied. The leaching residue was found to be an effective adsorbent for all of the tested elements; however, it was inactive in the solution containing As(V). The chemical activation of adsorbent in 10 vol. % HCl resulted in the greatest improvement of adsorption properties, while the activation in 10 vol. % HNO3 and heat treatment at 250 °C did not significantly affect the sorption characteristics of treated adsorbents compared with the original leaching residue. After HCl activation, the maximal adsorption capacities for lead (12.0 mg/g at pH 5.0 after 1 h), nickel (3.1 mg/g at pH 5.5 after 4 h) and cobalt (2.0 mg/g at pH 5.0 after 2 h) were achieved. Additional mechanical treatment connected with HCl activation provided the highest adsorption capacities for cadmium (11.5 mg/g at pH 4.0) and copper (5.7 mg/g at pH 4.5). Coprecipitation of Fe/Al-based particles on the surface of the leaching residue increased As(V) removal of the adsorbent. Surface coating based on AlIII was extremely effective, causing the increase of the adsorption capacity from 0 with the original leaching residue, to 28.1 mg/g (pH 7.0, 24 min). Kinetics studies showed the rapid progress of adsorption for Pb(II), Cd(II), and As(V) in tens of minutes, while the adsorption of Cu(II), Ni(II) and Co(II) approached a steady state after 2 h. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Removal and Recycling)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Double Leached Waelz Oxide for Identification of Fluoride Mineral
Metals 2019, 9(3), 361; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9030361 - 20 Mar 2019
Abstract
Double leached Waelz oxide (DLWO), with 76% zinc, is a secondary zinc containing raw materials obtained by the treatment of electric arc furnace dust. The content of fluoride in DLWO is still too high for direct leaching, as fluoride has a detrimental effect [...] Read more.
Double leached Waelz oxide (DLWO), with 76% zinc, is a secondary zinc containing raw materials obtained by the treatment of electric arc furnace dust. The content of fluoride in DLWO is still too high for direct leaching, as fluoride has a detrimental effect on electrowinning for zinc production. Knowledge of the characteristics of DLWO, and especially on how a fluoride mineral might exist, can contribute to further improvement of the selective leaching for the removal of fluoride. In this study, DLWO was characterized using analytical techniques, such as inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), 19F liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (19F LS NMR), X-ray powder diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and 19F solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (19F SS NMR). This study showed that DLWO mainly consisted of zincite (ZnO), cerussite (PbCO3) and a spinel containing zinc, iron and manganese. The fluoride mineral identified was calcium fluoride (CaF2). In SEM analysis, fluorine was found in larger grains together with calcium and oxygen, which was possibly calcium carbonate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Metal Removal and Recycling)
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