Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of TRIP/TWIP Steels

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701). This special issue belongs to the section "Metal Casting, Forming and Heat Treatment".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2023) | Viewed by 7285

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School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819, China
Interests: material processing; high temperature alloys
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Ultra-high manganese steels containing 15–25 weight % Mn and with additions of Si and Al of ~2–4 weight % are characterized by a high-strength–high-ductility combination, excellent formability, and superior fracture toughness because of TRIP (transformation-induced plasticity) or TWIP (twinning-induced plasticity) effects. Fe-C-Mn alloys have relatively low stacking fault energy. The addition of Al and Si elements to the Fe–Mn alloys impacts their stacking fault energy and phase stability, leading to variable mechanical properties that are governed by the extent of deformation twinning and strain-induced martensitic transformation, namely, γ(fcc)→ε(hcp) and γ(fcc)→α(bct). Recent studies have indicated that the Fe–Mn–Al–Si alloy primarily exhibits a TRIP effect when the manganese content is less than 15 weight %, while the TWIP effect is dominant when manganese content is higher than 25 weight %. However, when the manganese content is 15–25 weight %, the TRIP and TWIP effects coexist. TRIP/TWIP steels are effective candidates for automotive sheet because they can reduce the weight of the automotive components, improve fuel efficiency, reduce emission, and enhance the degree of safety.

The Special Issue will include articles reporting new and progressive research results in the areas of medium Mn and high Mn steels, as well as reviews of particular classes of fundamental physics of the materials and their applications. Manuscripts will be welcomed from both fundamental scientific researchers and authors belonging to industrial companies involved in the field.

Prof. Dr. Zhengyou Tang
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • Microstructures
  • Mechanical properties
  • TRIP
  • TWIP
  • Medium Mn steel
  • High Mn steel
  • Deformation mechanism

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

8 pages, 2627 KiB  
Communication
High Manganese TWIP Steel with Increased Corrosion Resistance
by Pavel Podany, Tomas Gregor, Tomas Studecky and Crtomir Donik
Metals 2022, 12(10), 1765; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12101765 - 20 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1294
Abstract
The paper describes the development of austenitic steel with the TWIP effect, which is alloyed with chromium to increase corrosion resistance. The experimental heat of this steel was cast in an experimental melting furnace and subsequently subjected to hot and cold rolling. After [...] Read more.
The paper describes the development of austenitic steel with the TWIP effect, which is alloyed with chromium to increase corrosion resistance. The experimental heat of this steel was cast in an experimental melting furnace and subsequently subjected to hot and cold rolling. After cold rolling, the appropriate recrystallization annealing temperature was applied to obtain the optimal austenitic grain size. X-ray diffraction proved that the steel contains a fully austenitic structure. After recrystallization annealing, the sheets achieved a TS of more than 950 MPa with an elongation of 40%. The corrosion resistance of this steel is increased with the addition of chromium. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of TRIP/TWIP Steels)
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10 pages, 3024 KiB  
Article
Microstructure, Mechanical Properties and Deformation Behavior of Fe-28.7Mn-10.2Al-1.06C High Specific Strength Steel
by Liang Ma, Zhengyou Tang, Zeyu You, Guofu Guan, Hua Ding and Devesh Misra
Metals 2022, 12(4), 602; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12040602 - 31 Mar 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1580
Abstract
The microstructure, properties and deformation behavior of Fe-28.7Mn-10.2Al-1.06C high specific strength steel were studied. The results showed that the density of experimental steel is about 6.59 g/cm3 and the microstructure is austenite. With the increase in the annealing temperature, the tensile strength [...] Read more.
The microstructure, properties and deformation behavior of Fe-28.7Mn-10.2Al-1.06C high specific strength steel were studied. The results showed that the density of experimental steel is about 6.59 g/cm3 and the microstructure is austenite. With the increase in the annealing temperature, the tensile strength decreases and the elongation increases. When the annealing temperature is 950 °C, the strength-plastic product of the experimental steel is 54.82 GPa%, and the specific strength is 1.48 × 105 N·m/kg. Compared with 20Mn2CrNb high strength automobile steel, the specific strength of laboratory steel is increased by more than 20%. The deformation behavior of experimental steel is mainly: At the low strain, spacing of slip surface decreases; at high strain, dislocation walls and micro-strips are formed, and the austenite grains are segmented, increasing the dislocation density and starting more secondary slips. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of TRIP/TWIP Steels)
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18 pages, 17485 KiB  
Article
Deformation Lenses in a Bonding Zone of High-Alloyed Steel Laminates Manufactured by Cold Roll Bonding
by Mikhail Seleznev, Christoph Renzing, Matthias Schmidtchen, Ulrich Prahl, Horst Biermann and Anja Weidner
Metals 2022, 12(4), 590; https://doi.org/10.3390/met12040590 - 30 Mar 2022
Viewed by 1781
Abstract
The combination of strength of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel and ductility of twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel can be achieved by manufacturing laminated composites via cold roll bonding (CRB). Work hardening of the surface before CRB produces deformation lenses (DLs), which play significant role [...] Read more.
The combination of strength of transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel and ductility of twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel can be achieved by manufacturing laminated composites via cold roll bonding (CRB). Work hardening of the surface before CRB produces deformation lenses (DLs), which play significant role in bonding, but are reported rarely in the literature. The present work aimed to study the DLs at the bonding interface of the laminated composite made of high-alloy TRIP and TWIP steels manufactured by CRB. The DLs and interfaces were investigated by means of scanning and transmission electron microscopy, roughness measurement, tensile and peel tests. Laminates showed ultimate tensile strength up to 900 MPa and elongation up to 45% maintaining the layer’s integrity up to failure. The TWIP–TWIP interface has shown higher maximum peel strength (up to 195 N/cm) than that of a TRIP–TWIP interface (up to 130 N/cm), which was found to be in direct proportion to the overall area of DLs. Bonding of the laminate layers was found to occur between DL fragments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of TRIP/TWIP Steels)
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16 pages, 4148 KiB  
Article
Tailoring the Austenite Fraction of a Cu and Ni Containing Medium-Mn Steel via Warm Rolling
by Zigan Xu, Jiyao Li, Xiao Shen, Tarek Allam, Silvia Richter, Wenwen Song and Wolfgang Bleck
Metals 2021, 11(12), 1888; https://doi.org/10.3390/met11121888 - 23 Nov 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1657
Abstract
Developing medium-Mn steels (MMnS) demands a better understanding of the microstructure evolution during thermo-mechanical treatments (TMTs). This study demonstrates the relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties of a warm-rolled medium-Mn steel (MMnS) containing 1.5 wt. % Cu and 1.5 wt. % Ni. [...] Read more.
Developing medium-Mn steels (MMnS) demands a better understanding of the microstructure evolution during thermo-mechanical treatments (TMTs). This study demonstrates the relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical properties of a warm-rolled medium-Mn steel (MMnS) containing 1.5 wt. % Cu and 1.5 wt. % Ni. After short-time warm rolling (WR) in an intercritical temperature range, a significant quantity (40.6 vol.%) of austenite was reverted and retained after air cooling. The microstructure and tensile properties of the WR specimens were compared with two typical process routes, namely hot rolling+ cold rolling+ annealing+ tempering (CRAT) and warm rolling+ annealing+ tempering (WRAT). The WR specimen exhibited comparable tensile properties with the CRAT specimens (967 MPa yield strength, 1155 MPa tensile strength, 23% total elongation), with a remarkably shortened process route, which was derived from the dislocation accumulation and austenite reversion during rolling. The WR route stands out among the traditional CRAT and the extended WRAT routes for its excellent tensile properties and compact processing route. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of TRIP/TWIP Steels)
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