Special Issue "Modelling the Deformation, Recrystallization and Microstructure-Related Properties in Metals"

A special issue of Metals (ISSN 2075-4701).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jurij J. Sidor

Savaria Institute of Technology, Faculty of Informatics, Eötvös Loránd University. Károlyi Gáspár tér 4, 9700 Szombathely, Hungary
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Microstructure and texture evolution in polycrystalline materials, texture modelling during thermo-mechanical processing, materials characterization, Al alloys, Electrical steels

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Experimental investigations of the thermomechanical processing (TMP) of metals clearly demonstrates that technological process tuning parameters have a great influence on both the microstructure and texture evolution, which determine the chemical, physical, or mechanical properties. During the processing chain, the behavior of a polycrystalline material is correlated with the grain size, grain crystal structure, and crystallographic orientation. The mesoscopic transformations of polycrystalline aggregates, involving microstructural and crystallographic changes on the grain level, can be interpreted by a vast body of modelling approaches developed. Advances in modelling have created a solid platform for understanding the evolution of microstructural features in polycrystalline systems during particular processing step and bring to light many hidden aspects of production as well as assist in revealing the behavior of materials under specific circumstances. Since mesoscopic changes in TMP are “genetically” connected, the modelling techniques enable tuning particular processing step to tailor the desired material performance for a given application.

In this Special Issue, we intend to provide a wide spectrum of articles dealing with modelling of microstructural aspects involved in deformation and recrystallization as well as simulation of microstructure-based or texture-based properties in various metals. The latest advances in the theoretical interpretation of mesoscopic transformations based on experimental observations are welcome. The studies dealing with the modelling of structure-property relationships are of particular interest.

Prof. Dr. Jurij J. Sidor
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Microstructure
  • Texture
  • Modelling
  • Deformation
  • Recrystallization
  • Microstructure and Texture Related Properties

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Open AccessArticle
Numerical Investigation of Secondary Deformation Mechanisms on Plastic Deformation of AZ31 Magnesium Alloy Using Viscoplastic Self-Consistent Model
Metals 2019, 9(1), 41; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9010041
Received: 2 December 2018 / Revised: 27 December 2018 / Accepted: 28 December 2018 / Published: 5 January 2019
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Abstract
Uniaxial tension and compression of AZ31 magnesium alloy were numerically investigated via the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) model to shed a light on the effect of secondary deformation mechanisms (prismatic <a> slip, pyramidal <c+a> slip, and {101¯1} contraction twinning) [...] Read more.
Uniaxial tension and compression of AZ31 magnesium alloy were numerically investigated via the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) model to shed a light on the effect of secondary deformation mechanisms (prismatic <a> slip, pyramidal <c+a> slip, and { 10 1 ¯ 1 } contraction twinning) during plastic deformation. The method adopted in the present study used different combinations of deformation mechanisms in the VPSC modeling. In terms of the pyramidal <c+a> slip, it served as the first candidate for sustaining the extra plastic strain during the plastic deformation. The improvement of activity in the pyramidal <c+a> slip contributed to the increase in the mechanical response and the splitting of pole densities in { 0002 } pole figure during uniaxial tension. As for the prismatic <a> slip, its increasing activity was not only conducive to the improvement of flow stress in mechanical response, but also responsible for the splitting of pole densities in { 0002 } pole figure during uniaxial compression. With respect to the { 10 1 ¯ 1 } contraction twinning, it had a negligible influence on the plastic deformation of AZ31 magnesium alloy in terms of the mechanical response as well as the slip and the twinning activities. However, it is better to include the { 10 1 ¯ 1 } contraction twinning in the VPSC modeling to more accurately predict the texture evolution. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Springback Prediction of a Hot Stamping Component Based on the Area Fractions of Phases
Metals 2019, 9(6), 694; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9060694
Received: 31 May 2019 / Revised: 13 June 2019 / Accepted: 14 June 2019 / Published: 20 June 2019
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Abstract
Different from traditional hot stamping components with full martensite, the new tailored hot stamping (THS) components have different quenched microstructures, which results in their lower shape accuracy. To investigate the influence of different quenched phases on the springback of a component, a THS [...] Read more.
Different from traditional hot stamping components with full martensite, the new tailored hot stamping (THS) components have different quenched microstructures, which results in their lower shape accuracy. To investigate the influence of different quenched phases on the springback of a component, a THS experiment of a U-shaped component was performed with segmented heating and a cooling tool. The area fractions of phases at different tool temperatures were obtained by a two-stage color tint etching procedure. Results showed that the quenched phase of the cold zone was almost full martensite. The area fraction of martensite in the hot zone was reduced to the lowest 13% at the tool temperature of 600 °C, while the bainite content reached the highest at 70%. The springback angles at different tool temperatures for quenching were measured by 3D scanning technology and the reverse modeling method. It was revealed that the springback angle increased with the increase of martensite and yet decreased with the increase of bainite. The relationship between the springback angle and the area fractions of the quenched phases was established by means of multiple linear regression analyses. The error analysis results of the predictions and measurements showed that the springback analysis model, based on the area fractions of quenched phases, could be used to predict the springback of hot stamping components with tailored properties. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Investigation of the Dynamic Recrystallization of FeMnSiCrNi Shape Memory Alloy under Hot Compression Based on Cellular Automaton
Metals 2019, 9(4), 469; https://doi.org/10.3390/met9040469
Received: 29 March 2019 / Revised: 16 April 2019 / Accepted: 19 April 2019 / Published: 22 April 2019
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Abstract
Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) takes place when FeMnSiCrNi shape memory alloy (SMA) is subjected to compression deformation at high temperatures. Cellular automaton (CA) simulation was used for revealing the DRX mechanism of FeMnSiCrNi SMA by predicting microstructures, grain size, flow stress, and dislocation density. [...] Read more.
Dynamic recrystallization (DRX) takes place when FeMnSiCrNi shape memory alloy (SMA) is subjected to compression deformation at high temperatures. Cellular automaton (CA) simulation was used for revealing the DRX mechanism of FeMnSiCrNi SMA by predicting microstructures, grain size, flow stress, and dislocation density. The DRX of FeMnSiCrNi SMA has a characteristic of repeated nucleation and finite growth. The size of recrystallized grains increases with increasing deformation temperatures, but it decreases with increasing strain rates. The increase of deformation temperature leads to the decrease of the flow stress, whereas the increase in strain rate results in the increase of the flow stress. The dislocation density exhibits the same situation as the flow stress. The simulated results were supported by the experimental ones very well. Dislocation density is a crucial factor during DRX of FeMnSiCrNi SMA. It affects not only the nucleation but also the growth of the recrystallized grains. Occurrence of DRX depends on a critical dislocation density. The difference between the dislocation densities of the recrystallized and original grains becomes the driving force for the growth of the recrystallized grains, which lays a solid foundation for the recrystallized grains growing repeatedly. Full article
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