Special Issue "Mass Spectrometry and Chromatography Based Analytics in Lipid Metabolism"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). This special issue belongs to the section "Lipid Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Beate Fuchs
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Leibniz Institute for Farm Animal Biology (FBN), Core Facility Metabolomics, Wilhelm-Stahl-Allee 2, 18196 Dummerstorf, Germany
Interests: regulation of lipid metabolism; lipidomics; metabolomics; mass spectrometry and analytics (GC-MS/MS, MALDI-TOF MS, TLC, HR-ESI-MS/MS)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Based on technological developments of the last decade, including progress with analytical techniques and informatics for data processing, lipidomics has become an important part of metabolomics research. There are many lipidomics-driven studies; such studies range from the fundamental to the applied sciences in the fields of plant, agriculture, food, microbes, pharmaceutics, and medicine. To identify and quantify lipid species, researchers are taking advantage of recent developments in the area of lipidomics, mainly involving mass spectrometry and further techniques, such as chromatographic separations but also NMR spectroscopy.

This Special Issue of Metabolites, “Mass Spectrometry and Chromatography based Analytics in Lipid Metabolism”, will be dedicated to in-depth applications of lipidomics techniques to the applied sciences and cutting-edge technological development for detailed analytics, both from a fundamental and an applied point of view. The topics that will be covered by this Special Issue include the following: quality control of foods, traditional medicines, microbial metabolism, identification of novel lipid functions, biomarker discovery for diseases diagnosis and pharmaceutical development, lipidomics flux analysis using stable isotopes, single-cell analysis requiring a sensitive quantification of diverse lipids in tiny samples, empirical and computational methods of annotating lipids, imaging of lipids and the mathematical modeling of lipid metabolism. Manuscripts dealing with other challenging issues are also highly desired.

Dr. Beate Fuchs
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lipidomics
  • phospholipids
  • lipids
  • fatty acids
  • mass spectrometry
  • liquid chromatography
  • gas chromatography

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Article
Lipid Metabolism, Carcass Characteristics and Longissimus dorsi Muscle Fatty Acid Composition of Tropical Crossbred Beef Cattle in Response to Desmanthus spp. Forage Backgrounding
Metabolites 2021, 11(12), 804; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo11120804 - 27 Nov 2021
Viewed by 176
Abstract
Lipid metabolism, carcass characteristics and fatty acid (FA) composition of the Longissimus dorsi (loin eye) muscle were evaluated in tropical crossbred steers backgrounded on Desmanthus spp. (desmanthus) with or without feedlot finishing. It was hypothesized that steers backgrounded on isonitrogenous diets augmented with [...] Read more.
Lipid metabolism, carcass characteristics and fatty acid (FA) composition of the Longissimus dorsi (loin eye) muscle were evaluated in tropical crossbred steers backgrounded on Desmanthus spp. (desmanthus) with or without feedlot finishing. It was hypothesized that steers backgrounded on isonitrogenous diets augmented with incremental proportions of desmanthus will produce carcasses with similar characteristics and FA composition. Forty-eight Brahman, Charbray and Droughtmaster crossbred beef steers were backgrounded for 140 days on Rhodes grass (Chloris gayana) hay augmented with 0, 15, 30 or 45 percent desmanthus on dry matter basis. Lucerne (Medicago sativa) hay was added to the 0, 15 and 30 percent desmanthus diets to ensure that they were isonitrogenous with the 45 percent desmanthus diet. After backgrounding, the two heaviest steers in each pen were slaughtered and the rest were finished in the feedlot for 95 days before slaughter. Muscle biopsy samples were taken at the beginning and end of the backgrounding phase. Carcasses were sampled at slaughter for intramuscular fat (IMF) content, fat melting point (FMP) and FA composition analyses. Increasing the proportion of desmanthus in the diet led to a linear increase in docosanoic acid (p = 0.04) and omega-6/omega-3 polyunsaturated FA ratio (n-6/n-3 PUFA; p = 0.01), while docosahexaenoic acid decreased linearly (p = 0.01). Feedlot finishing increased hot carcass weight, subcutaneous fat depth at the P8 site and dressing percentage (p ≤ 0.04). The n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio was within the recommended < 5 for human diets. IMF was within the consumer-preferred ≥3% level for palatability. The hypothesis that steers backgrounded on isonitrogenous diets augmented with incremental proportions of desmanthus will produce similar carcass characteristics and FA composition was accepted. These findings indicate that a combination of tropical beef cattle backgrounding on desmanthus augmented forage and short-term feedlot finishing produces healthy and highly palatable meat. Full article
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