Special Issue "10th Anniversary of Metabolites: The Changing Landscape of Metabolomics"

A special issue of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Peter Meikle
Website
Guest Editor
Metabolomics Laboratory NHMRC, Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Victoria 3004, Australia
Interests: dyslipidemia associated with obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease and its relationship to the pathogenesis of these disease states; application of lipidomics to the early diagnosis, risk assessment and therapeutic monitoring of these most prevalent diseases
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is dedicated to celebration of the 10th anniversary of Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989). To commemorate this milestone, we are requesting submission of reviews of the field and research papers that are "pushing the boundaries of metabolomics and lipidomics". The scope of these manuscripts should fall within the range of the mission of the journal, but is not limited to any particular themes: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/metabolites/about.

Metabolites (ISSN 2218-1989) is an open-access journal of metabolism and metabolomics, supported by an outstanding Editorial Board composed of high-profile researchers. It just received its First Impact Factor of 3.303, and is indexed by the Science Citation Index Expanded (Web of Science), PubMed Central, Scopus (CiteScore in 2018: 3.75), and other important databases. In addition, the Metabolomics Society (MetSoc) is now an affiliated society member of Metabolites.

We look forward to your contribution. Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

Prof. Dr. Peter Meikle
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Metabolites is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Absolute Quantification of the Central Carbon Metabolome in Eight Commonly Applied Prokaryotic and Eukaryotic Model Systems
Metabolites 2020, 10(2), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10020074 - 19 Feb 2020
Abstract
Absolute quantification of intracellular metabolite pools is a prerequisite for modeling and in-depth biological interpretation of metabolomics data. It is the final step of an elaborate metabolomics workflow, with challenges associated with all steps—from sampling to quantifying the physicochemically diverse metabolite pool. Chromatographic [...] Read more.
Absolute quantification of intracellular metabolite pools is a prerequisite for modeling and in-depth biological interpretation of metabolomics data. It is the final step of an elaborate metabolomics workflow, with challenges associated with all steps—from sampling to quantifying the physicochemically diverse metabolite pool. Chromatographic separation combined with mass spectrometric (MS) detection is the superior platform for high coverage, selective, and sensitive detection of metabolites. Herein, we apply our quantitative MS-metabolomics workflow to measure and present the central carbon metabolome of a panel of commonly applied biological model systems. The workflow includes three chromatographic methods combined with isotope dilution tandem mass spectrometry to allow for absolute quantification of 68 metabolites of glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and the amino acid and (deoxy) nucleoside pools. The biological model systems; Bacillus subtilis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, two microalgal species, and four human cell lines were all cultured in commonly applied culture media and sampled in exponential growth phase. Both literature and databases are scarce with comprehensive metabolite datasets, and existing entries range over several orders of magnitude. The workflow and metabolite panel presented herein can be employed to expand the list of reference metabolomes, as encouraged by the metabolomics community, in a continued effort to develop and refine high-quality quantitative metabolomics workflows. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Toward a Standardized Strategy of Clinical Metabolomics for the Advancement of Precision Medicine
Metabolites 2020, 10(2), 51; https://doi.org/10.3390/metabo10020051 - 29 Jan 2020
Abstract
Despite the tremendous success, pitfalls have been observed in every step of a clinical metabolomics workflow, which impedes the internal validity of the study. Furthermore, the demand for logistics, instrumentations, and computational resources for metabolic phenotyping studies has far exceeded our expectations. In [...] Read more.
Despite the tremendous success, pitfalls have been observed in every step of a clinical metabolomics workflow, which impedes the internal validity of the study. Furthermore, the demand for logistics, instrumentations, and computational resources for metabolic phenotyping studies has far exceeded our expectations. In this conceptual review, we will cover inclusive barriers of a metabolomics-based clinical study and suggest potential solutions in the hope of enhancing study robustness, usability, and transferability. The importance of quality assurance and quality control procedures is discussed, followed by a practical rule containing five phases, including two additional “pre-pre-” and “post-post-” analytical steps. Besides, we will elucidate the potential involvement of machine learning and demonstrate that the need for automated data mining algorithms to improve the quality of future research is undeniable. Consequently, we propose a comprehensive metabolomics framework, along with an appropriate checklist refined from current guidelines and our previously published assessment, in the attempt to accurately translate achievements in metabolomics into clinical and epidemiological research. Furthermore, the integration of multifaceted multi-omics approaches with metabolomics as the pillar member is in urgent need. When combining with other social or nutritional factors, we can gather complete omics profiles for a particular disease. Our discussion reflects the current obstacles and potential solutions toward the progressing trend of utilizing metabolomics in clinical research to create the next-generation healthcare system. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.


Title: Computational methods for liquid chromatography mass spectrometry-based metabolite annotation and identification
Authors: Justin Van der Hooft; Simon Rogers
Affiliation: Bioinformatics Group, Department of Plant Sciences, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands;
University of Glasgow, Glasgow, United Kingdom
Title: Reference Central Carbon Metabolomes of important biological model systems
Authors: Per Bruheim
Affiliation: Department of Biotechnology and Food Science, NTNU Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7491 Trondheim, Norway
Title: Moving beyond the status marker for vitamin D measurements: deciphering the role of vitamin D in health and disease from the vitamin D sub-metabolome
Authors: Dietrich A. Volmer; Caroline S. Stokes
Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Humboldt University Berlin, Brook-Taylor-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin, Germany; Universität des Saarlandes, Saarbrücken, Germany

Title: Metabolomics and lipidomics: expanding the landscape of exercise biology
Authors: Mehdi R. Belhaj; Nolan J. Hoffman
Affiliation: Exercise and Nutrition Research Program, Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University, Level 5, 215 Spring Street, Melbourne, Victoria 3000 Australia
Abstract: Dynamic changes in circulating and tissue metabolites and lipids occur in response to exercise-induced metabolic and mechanical stress. The application of metabolomics and lipidomics to unravel the complex physiological responses to exercise have expanded over the last decade thanks to major analytical advancements, with most exercise-related studies to date conducted in humans. Experimental and analytical considerations, as well as complementary studies in animal models, are warranted to help overcome challenges associated with large human inter-individual variability and decipher the metabolic health-promoting effects of exercise. We discuss recent advancements in human and animal exercise metabolomics and lipidomics in this review, as well as highlight technical considerations and key remaining knowledge gaps to expand the landscape of exercise biology.

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