Special Issue "Non-destructive Testing of Structures"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Structure Analysis and Characterization".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Assoc. Prof. Magdalena Rucka
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mechanics of Materials and Structures, Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Gdansk University of Technology, Narutowicza 11/12, 80-233 Gdansk, Poland
Interests: non-destructive testing; ultrasonic waves; ground penetrating radar; dynamics of structures; material testing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Engineering structures are gradually destroyed over time due to the influence of atmospheric conditions, excessive loads, and processes of natural aging. Since damage in a structural element may lead to improper operation of the whole object, various damage detection and structural health monitoring methods have thus been investigated and developed to improve reliability and safety and to solve maintenance problems of infrastructural and mechanical structures.

It is my pleasure to invite you to submit a manuscript for this Special Issue focused on novel NDT approaches, development of single and integrated measurement techniques, and advanced signal processing and modeling. The aim of this Special Issue is to gather the experience of civil, mechanical, and aerospace research communities in the latest advances and trends in the field of non-destructive diagnostics of structures and their components.

The topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Condition assessment of civil, mechanical, aerospace, and offshore structures, as well as connections of structural elements;
  • Diagnostics of cultural heritage monuments;
  • Testing of structures made of novel materials;
  • Structural health monitoring systems;
  • Integration of non-destructive testing methods (e.g., guided waves, ground penetrating radar, acoustic emission, thermography);
  • Advanced signal processing for NDT;
  • Damage detection and damage imaging;
  • Modeling and numerical analyses for supporting SHM systems.

Assoc. Prof. Magdalena Rucka
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • non-destructive testing
  • structural health monitoring
  • metallic, concrete, wood, and composite structures
  • smart materials and structures
  • damage detection and visualization
  • modeling and simulations

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Methodology for Controlling the Technological Process of Executing Floors Made of Cement-Based Materials
Materials 2020, 13(4), 948; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13040948 - 20 Feb 2020
Abstract
The article presents original complex methodology for the effective control of the entire process of executing floors made of cement-based materials. This methodology has been lacking in literature so far. The methodology was developed on the basis of many years of the authors’ [...] Read more.
The article presents original complex methodology for the effective control of the entire process of executing floors made of cement-based materials. This methodology has been lacking in literature so far. The methodology was developed on the basis of many years of the authors’ experience, which was acquired when diagnosing the technical condition of such floors. The methodology was preceded by a synthetic summary of the most important technological and technical requirements for floors made of cement-based materials. It was also enriched with a discussion of the problem documented by sample research results showing the state that may be the result of disregarding and not performing the necessary control activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-destructive Testing of Structures)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
The Use of Dijkstra’s Algorithm in Assessing the Correctness of Imaging Brittle Damage in Concrete Beams by Means of Ultrasonic Transmission Tomography
Materials 2020, 13(3), 551; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13030551 - 23 Jan 2020
Abstract
The accuracy of transmission ultrasonic tomography for the detection of brittle damage in concrete beams can be effectively supported by the graph theory and, in particular, by Dijkstra’s algorithm. It allows determining real paths of the fastest ultrasonic wave propagation in concrete containing [...] Read more.
The accuracy of transmission ultrasonic tomography for the detection of brittle damage in concrete beams can be effectively supported by the graph theory and, in particular, by Dijkstra’s algorithm. It allows determining real paths of the fastest ultrasonic wave propagation in concrete containing localized elastically degraded zones at any stage of their evolution. This work confronts this type of approach with results that can be obtained from non-local isotropic damage mechanics. On this basis, the authors developed a method of reducing errors in tomographic reconstruction of longitudinal wave velocity maps which are caused by using the simplifying assumptions of straightness of the fastest wave propagation paths. The method is based on the appropriate elongation of measured propagation times of the wave transmitted between opposite sending-receiving transducers if the actual propagation paths deviate from straight lines. Thanks to this, the mathematical apparatus used typically in the tomography, in which the straightness of the fastest paths is assumed, can be still used. The work considers also the aspect of using fictitious wave sending-receiving points in ultrasonic tomography for which wave propagation times are calculated by interpolation of measured ones. The considerations are supported by experimental research conducted on laboratory reinforced concrete (RC) beams in the test of three-point bending and a prefabricated damaged RC beam. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-destructive Testing of Structures)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Influence of Crack Size on Stress Evaluation of Ferromagnetic Low Alloy Steel with Metal Magnetic Memory Technology
Materials 2019, 12(24), 4028; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12244028 - 04 Dec 2019
Abstract
Based on the magneto-mechanical effect, the influence of crack size on stress evaluated with metal magnetic memory (MMM) technology was discussed in this paper. Based on equivalent theory, the regular rectangular grooves, with different widths and depths, were precut in the surface of [...] Read more.
Based on the magneto-mechanical effect, the influence of crack size on stress evaluated with metal magnetic memory (MMM) technology was discussed in this paper. Based on equivalent theory, the regular rectangular grooves, with different widths and depths, were precut in the surface of an experimental sample for simulating surface crack, and a three dimensional electrically controlled displacement system was used to collect the Hp(y) signal of the sample under different stresses, and the fracture morphology was observed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results show that the influence of detection line on Hp(y) signal can be ignored; as stress increases, the Hp(y) signal turns counterclockwise around zero-crossing point and its mutation, corresponding to the location of groove, becomes distinct gradually. When groove depth is constant, the magnetic intensity gradient changes in the form of quadratic polynomial as groove width increases, and when the groove width is the same, the magnetic intensity gradient is a linear function of groove depth. When stress reaches the yield strength of the material, the magnetic intensity gradient decreases gradually as stress increases further, and the orientation of magnetic domain is seen as the main reason for that result. At last, the experimental results are discussed based on the piezomagnetic effect and leakage magnetic field theory of finite depth slit model, and the change of magnetic domain orientation is considered to be the main reason. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-destructive Testing of Structures)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Detection of Delamination with Various Width-to-depth Ratios in Concrete Bridge Deck Using Passive IRT: Limits and Applicability
Materials 2019, 12(23), 3996; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12233996 - 02 Dec 2019
Abstract
In bridge structures, concrete decks have a higher risk of damage than other components owing to the direct impact of traffic. This study aims to develop a comprehensive system for bridge inspection using passive infrared thermography (IRT). Experiments were conducted on a concrete [...] Read more.
In bridge structures, concrete decks have a higher risk of damage than other components owing to the direct impact of traffic. This study aims to develop a comprehensive system for bridge inspection using passive infrared thermography (IRT). Experiments were conducted on a concrete specimen (assumed as the surface of the bridge deck) embedded artificial delaminations with different width-to-depth ratios (WTDRs). Both professional handheld IR camera (H-IRC) and a UAV mounted with an IR camera (UAV-IRC) were employed simultaneously to capture the surface temperature of the structure. The present work indicates that the passive IRT technique with an H-IRC can be used to detect delaminations located at depths of 4 cm or less from the structure surface if the WTDRs are not lesser than 1.9 for daytime and 2.5 for nighttime when testing on a sunny day. In addition, the larger the WTDR, the higher the temperature difference can be produced, thus delaminations could be observed more clearly. Furthermore, our study suggests that the concrete bridge deck inspection using passive IRT can produce appropriate results if the inspection is performed from 10:00 to 15:00 or from 19:30 to approximately 2:00 on a sunny day. Good agreement between the results obtained from tests using H-IRC and UAV-IRC was observed, which validates the application of UAV-IRC in real structure inspection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-destructive Testing of Structures)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Determination of Thermophysical Parameters Involved in The Numerical Model to Predict the Temperature Field of Cast-In-Place Concrete Bridge Deck
Materials 2019, 12(19), 3089; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12193089 - 22 Sep 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The paper deals with a concept of a practical computation method to simulate the temperature distribution in an extradosed bridge deck. The main goal of the study is to develop a feasible model of hardening of concrete consistent with in-situ measurement capabilities. The [...] Read more.
The paper deals with a concept of a practical computation method to simulate the temperature distribution in an extradosed bridge deck. The main goal of the study is to develop a feasible model of hardening of concrete consistent with in-situ measurement capabilities. The presented investigations include laboratory tests of high performance concrete, measurements of temperature evolution in the bridge deck and above all, numerical simulations of temperature field in a concrete box bridge girder. A thermal conductivity equation in the author’s program, using finite difference method has been solved. New approach for identification of the model parameters and boundary conditions (heat transfer coefficients) has been proposed. The numerical results are verified by means of a wide set of experimental tests carried out on three stages of the extradosed bridge studies. A high agreement between the concrete temperature distribution in the time and space domain was obtained. The temperature history of concrete hardening, supplemented with maturity method equations, made it possible to estimate an early-age compressive strength of the cast-in-place concrete. The proposed solution could be applied in a Structural Health Monitoring system for concrete objects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-destructive Testing of Structures)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
On the Influence of Capillary-Based Structural Health Monitoring on Fatigue Crack Initiation and Propagation in Straight Lugs
Materials 2019, 12(18), 2965; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12182965 - 12 Sep 2019
Abstract
This paper addresses the influence on the fatigue life induced by the implementation of a capillary-based structural health monitoring methodology, patented under the name eSHM. It consists in integrating structurally small and pressurized capillaries into the component, so that when a fatigue crack [...] Read more.
This paper addresses the influence on the fatigue life induced by the implementation of a capillary-based structural health monitoring methodology, patented under the name eSHM. It consists in integrating structurally small and pressurized capillaries into the component, so that when a fatigue crack breaches the capillary network, it results in a leak flow to the open atmosphere and loss of pressure in the galleries which is detected by a pressure sensor. The novelty of the proposed system resides in the opportunity to locate the capillary according to the designer’s need, as one resorts to additive manufacturing for the part production. However, the presence of these galleries in highly stressed regions raises concerns about crack initiation at the capillary itself and accelerated fatigue crack growth. This paper aims at the quantification of the influence the eSHM has on the fatigue behavior of the component and the determination whether this influence is significant or not. To that purpose, numerical simulations on a straight lug component, using the finite elements and eXtended Finite Elements Methods (XFEM), are performed. Various capillary sizes and shapes are assessed, so as to enable a general conclusion on the impact of the eSHM methodology in straight lugs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Non-destructive Testing of Structures)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Incorporating nondestructive testing in undergraduate curriculum - Some experiences

Authors: Ahmed Abdel-Mohti, Hui Shen, Blake Hylton, Seyed Mohammad Seyed Ardakani and Vishal Mehta

Affiliations: McNeese State University, Lake Charles, LA and Ohio Northern University, Ada, OH

Through a grant obtained from American society for nondestructive testing (ASNT), Undergraduate curriculum pedagogical methods have been enriched by including various active learning techniques such as problem based learning or project based learning. At authors institution, we have modified our curriculum to include some of this techniques using interdisciplinary approach across the entire engineering college. To be specific, we have embedded multiple contact points with nondestructive testing (NDT) methods in interdisciplinary engineering applications. The effort had three goals (i) Design and offer a new upper-level elective course in NDT, (ii) To incorporate NDT content into the introductory freshmen engineering course and (iii) To establish a pipeline of students interested in pursuing NDT research in the form of an independent student experience. This paper will discuss our approach and present our results, student and faculty feedback about the modification. We hope via this comprehensive work; similar institutions can adopt this approach to incorporate NDT in their own curriculum.

Back to TopTop