Special Issue "Digital Manufacturing in Dentistry"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Rosalia Maria Leonardi
Website
Guest Editor
University of CataniaDepartment of General Surgery and Surgical-Medical Specialties, School of Dentistry, University of Catania, Catania, Italy
Interests: orthodontics; digital dentistry; biomaterials; clear aligner; miniscrews; TADs; temporomandibular joint; cephalometric analysis
Professor Gaetano Isola
Website
Guest Editor
Department of General Surgery and Surgical-Medical Specialties, School of Dentistry, University of Catania, Piazza Università, 2, 95124 Catania CT, Italy
Interests: periodontal disease; oral surgery; oral health quality of life; oral diseases; systemic diseases; etiology of periodontitis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Cristina Grippaudo
Website
Guest Editor
Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore di Roma
Interests: oral surgery; digital dentistry; antimicrobial agents; oral health; biomaterials; clear aligner

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The digital revolution is changing how people think, communicate, and work. Digital transformation has facilitated the application of novel approaches, not only for dental treatment but also for diagnosis and evaluation. Even in dentistry, digital devices are making previously manual tasks easier, faster, cheaper, and more predictable. Digital Dentistry is aimed at favoring scientific progress and the applicative development of rehabilitation treatment in dentistry and, more generally, in the field of oro-maxillofacial treatment with the use of digital technologies. It was created to set and improve the evidence base of these new procedures and to provide a support network for all dental health professionals as they navigate through the morass of digital technologies, with the ultimate goal of benefiting patients.

The aim of this Special Issue is to provide insight into recent advances in the field of digital dentistry. Potential topics in this Special Issue include but are not limited to in vitro and clinical research using a variety of digital equipment, such as the intraoral, face, and cone-beam computed tomography scanners; computer-aided design software; milling machines; and 3D printers. Studies incorporating a new approach or providing novel information are of higher priority. Innovative digital workflows and systematic and narrative reviews of digital technologies in the field of dentistry are also welcome.

It is our pleasure to invite you to contribute to this Special Issue.

Prof. Rosalia Maria Leonardi
Prof. Gaetano Isola
Prof. Cristina Grippaudo
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • digital dentistry
  • digital orthodontics
  • digital prosthesis
  • digital workflow
  • digitization
  • computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)
  • dental biomaterials
  • additive manufacturing
  • in vitro research
  • clinical research

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Tooth Types on the Accuracy of Dental 3D Scanners: An In Vitro Study
Materials 2020, 13(7), 1744; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13071744 (registering DOI) - 09 Apr 2020
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of dental three-dimensional (3D) scanners according to the types of teeth. A computer-aided design (CAD) reference model (CRM) was obtained by scanning the reference typodont model using a high-precision industrial scanner (Solutionix C500, [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of dental three-dimensional (3D) scanners according to the types of teeth. A computer-aided design (CAD) reference model (CRM) was obtained by scanning the reference typodont model using a high-precision industrial scanner (Solutionix C500, MEDIT). In addition, a CAD test model (CTM) was obtained using seven types of dental 3D scanners (desktop scanners (E1 and DOF Freedom HD) and intraoral scanners (CS3500, CS3600, Trios2, Trios3, and i500)). The 3D inspection software (Geomagic control X, 3DSystems) was used to segment the CRM according to the types of teeth and to superimpose the CTM based on the segmented teeth. The 3D accuracy of the scanner was then analyzed according to the types of teeth. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to compare the differences according to the types of teeth in statistical analysis, and the Tukey HSD test was used for post hoc testing (α = 0.05). Both desktop and intraoral scanners showed significant differences in accuracy according to the types of teeth (P < 0.001), and the accuracy of intraoral scanners tended to get worse from anterior to posterior. Therefore, when scanning a complete arch using an intraoral scanner, the clinician should consider the tendency for the accuracy to decrease from anterior to posterior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Manufacturing in Dentistry)
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Open AccessArticle
Three-Dimensional Evaluation of Maxillary Sinus Changes in Growing Subjects: A Retrospective Cross-Sectional Study
Materials 2020, 13(4), 1007; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13041007 - 24 Feb 2020
Abstract
This study aims to evaluate changes of maxillary sinuses in growing subjects. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans of 146 patients were divided according to gender and age (6–8, 9–11, 12–14 years old). Left, right and total maxillary sinus volume (MSV-R, MSV-L, MSV-Tot) [...] Read more.
This study aims to evaluate changes of maxillary sinuses in growing subjects. Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) scans of 146 patients were divided according to gender and age (6–8, 9–11, 12–14 years old). Left, right and total maxillary sinus volume (MSV-R, MSV-L, MSV-Tot) and surface (MSS-R, MSS-L, MSS-Tot), left and right linear maximum width (LMW-L, LMW-R), depth (LMD-R, LMD-L) and height (LMH-R, LMH-R) were calculated using Mimics Research 22. Kruskal–Wallis Test and showed a statistically significant increase in both genders for all variables. Pairwise comparisons in females are always statistically significant in: LMH-R, LMH-R, MSS-Tot, MSV-Tot. All other variables showed a statistical significant increase between 9–11 and 12–14, and between 6–8 and 12–14 age groups, apart from LMSW-R, LMSW-L, LMSD-R, LMSD-L between 6–8 and 12–14 age groups. Pairwise comparisons in males are always and only statistically significant between 9–11 and 12–14, and between 6–8 and 12–14 groups. Symmetrical measurements (right and left) evaluated using Wilcoxon test retrieved no statistical significant difference. Comparisons between measurements on male and female subjects using Mann–Whitney test showed a statistical significant difference in 6–8 years group in MSV-R, MSV-L and MSV-Tot, and in 12–14 age group in MSV-R, MSV-L, MSV-Tot, MSS-r, MSS-l, MSS-Tot, MSW-R, MSW-L, MSD-R, MSD-L. Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) assessing inter-operator and intra-operator concordance retrieved excellent results for all variables. It appears that maxillary sinus growth resembles the differential peak of growth in male and female subjects. Sinuses starts to develop early in female subjects. However, in the first and last age group female sinuses are statistically significantly smaller compared to male ones. In male subjects, sinus growth occurs mainly between the second and third age group whilst in female subjects it starts between the first and second age group and continues between the second and the last. Sinus has a vertical development during the peak of growth, which is the main reason for its increase in volume. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Manufacturing in Dentistry)
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Open AccessArticle
Correlation between Dental Vestibular–Palatal Inclination and Alveolar Bone Remodeling after Orthodontic Treatment: A CBCT Analysis
Materials 2019, 12(24), 4225; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12244225 - 16 Dec 2019
Abstract
The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between dental vestibular–palatal inclination changes and the cortical bone remodeling after fixed orthodontic treatment using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty-two patients with Angle Class I malocclusion, permanent dentition, and mild to moderate [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to evaluate the correlation between dental vestibular–palatal inclination changes and the cortical bone remodeling after fixed orthodontic treatment using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Twenty-two patients with Angle Class I malocclusion, permanent dentition, and mild to moderate dental crowding were included in the present three-dimensional (3D) analysis. Bone dimensions were evaluated by CBCT scans obtained before and after orthodontic treatment, whereas the torque values were calculated by means of digital models using the 3D VistaDent software. A paired t-test was used to compare the changes between the pretreatment and post-treatment measurements. The correlations between variables were analyzed with linear regression analysis. A significant correlation between torque variations and bone thickness changes was observed for the apical buccal level of the anterior side (P < 0.05). Limited and not significant alveolar bone resorption for the apical thickness of anterior teeth occurred at ± 5 degrees of torque variation, while for tooth inclination exceeding +5 or −5 degrees, the bone remodeling was more evident. The present study demonstrated that anterior region was the most affected area by bone remodeling and that torque variation was highly related to apical bone thickness adaptation for maxillary and mandibular incisors and maxillary canines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Digital Manufacturing in Dentistry)
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