Special Issue "Advances in Functional Cellular Structures and Composites"

A special issue of Materials (ISSN 1996-1944). This special issue belongs to the section "Advanced Composites".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Michael Scheffler
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Guest Editor
Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany
Interests: cellular ceramics manufacturing and functionalization; energy materials, ceramics from polymeric precursors; functional coatings
Dr. Tobias Fey
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Guest Editor
Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg, Germany
Frontier Research Institute for Materials Science, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya, Japan
Interests: Periodic and nonperiodic cellular ceramics and composites, microstructure characterisation (esp. microtomography) and testing, simulation and modeling on µCT-derived microstructure models
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Ulf Betke
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Guest Editor
Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany
Interests: cellular ceramics manufacturing and functionalization; x-ray based material analyses; cellular adamantine compounds; Affiliation: Otto-von-Guericke University Magdeburg, Magdeburg, Germany

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Activities in the development, manufacturing and application of cellular structures such as foams or 3D periodic materials made of ceramic, polymeric and metallic base materials are steadily growing. The combination of matter and porosity, which extends the properties of related materials, is exciting the interest in these materials for engineering and biomedical applications. These include, to mention just a few: the lightweight design of tools, machines and engines; fluid-dynamic applications, such as metal and gas filtration and environmental cleaning; the conversion of heat and matter in chemical and physicochemical applications; and hard tissue repair in prosthetics.

Apart from the base properties as defined by their material/structure combination, a surface and/or strut functionalization or a material combination may be necessary for a specific application. In order to highlight the most recent developments in this demanding field of materials science and materials processing, the focus of this Special Issue is on the functionalization of the outer and inner surfaces of cellular materials, e.g. by coating and infiltration. Work dealing with cellular composite materials, e.g. by reinforcement to improve the mechanical properties, is also welcome. We look forward to receiving your valuable contributions, regardless of whether your paper deals with ceramic, metallic, or polymeric cellular materials, or combinations thereof.

Prof. Dr. Michael Scheffler
Dr. Tobias Fey
Dr. Ulf Betke
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Materials is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cellular materials
  • functionalization of cellular structures
  • composite materials

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Phase Evolution, Filler-Matrix Interactions, and Piezoelectric Properties in Lead Zirconate Titanate (PZT)-Filled Polymer-Derived Ceramics (PDCs)
Materials 2020, 13(7), 1520; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma13071520 - 26 Mar 2020
Abstract
PZT-silsesquioxane-based 0-3 hybrid materials are prepared by mixing lead zirconate titanate (Pb(Zr,Ti)O3; PZT) powder with a [R-SiO3/2]n (R = H, CH3, CH=CH2, C6H5) silsequioxane preceramic polymer. A PZT load up [...] Read more.
PZT-silsesquioxane-based 0-3 hybrid materials are prepared by mixing lead zirconate titanate (Pb(Zr,Ti)O3; PZT) powder with a [R-SiO3/2]n (R = H, CH3, CH=CH2, C6H5) silsequioxane preceramic polymer. A PZT load up to 55 vol.% can be reached in the final composite. The piezoelectric and mechanical properties are investigated as a function of the filler content and are compared with theoretical models and reference samples made of the pure preceramic polymer or PZT filler. The piezoelectric response of the composites, as expressed by the relative permittivity and the piezoelectric coefficients d33 and g33, increases with an increasing PZT content. The bending strength of the composites ranges between 15 MPa and 31 MPa without a clear correlation to the filler content. The thermal conductivity increases significantly from 0.14 W∙m−1∙K−1 for the pure polymer-derived ceramic (PDC) matrix to 0.30 W∙m−1∙K−1 for a sample containing 55 vol.% PZT filler. From X-ray diffraction experiments (XRD), specific interactions between the filler and matrix are observed; the crystallization of the PDC matrix in the presence of the PZT filler is inhibited; conversely, the PDC matrix results in a pronounced decomposition of the filler compared to the pure PZT material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Functional Cellular Structures and Composites)
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Open AccessArticle
Mechanical and Surface-Chemical Properties of Polymer Derived Ceramic Replica Foams
Materials 2019, 12(11), 1870; https://doi.org/10.3390/ma12111870 - 10 Jun 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Polymer derived ceramic foams were prepared with the replica method using filler free and filler loaded polysiloxane containing slurries for the impregnation of open celled polyurethane foams. A significant change in mechanical strength, porosity and surface energy, i.e., wettability after thermal treatment between [...] Read more.
Polymer derived ceramic foams were prepared with the replica method using filler free and filler loaded polysiloxane containing slurries for the impregnation of open celled polyurethane foams. A significant change in mechanical strength, porosity and surface energy, i.e., wettability after thermal treatment between 130 °C (crosslinking) and 1000 °C (pyrolysis) in argon atmosphere was observed. While low-temperature pyrolyzed foams are elastic and hydrophobic, foams pyrolyzed at high temperatures are brittle and hydrophilic, and they possess higher compression strength. Changes of these properties were correlated with the polymer-to-ceramic transformation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Functional Cellular Structures and Composites)
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