Special Issue "Land and Monsoon Interactions: Physical and Societal Aspects of Asian Monsoons"

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 April 2022) | Viewed by 3465

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Eungul Lee
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, Kyung Hee University, Seoul 130-701, Korea
Interests: climatology; monsoon climate; land–atmosphere interactions; climate impacts
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Yaqian He
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Geography, University of Central Arkansas, Conway, AR 72035, USA
Interests: land cover and land use change; land-atmosphere interactions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Jothiganesh Shanmugasundaram
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Regional Integrated Multi-Hazard Early Warning System (RIMES), Pathum Thani 12120, Thailand
Interests: monsoon climate; climate–society nexus; climate applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Monsoons are a seasonally changing wind circulation system often associated with extreme events such as floods and droughts. These major wind systems, caused by differential heating of the land and ocean, are typically characterized by a seasonal reversal in wind direction and heavy rainfall. The monsoon systems affect billions of people and their property from the tropics to the mid-latitudes in Asia. Significant changes in monsoon systems have been attributed to changes in both ocean and land surface characteristics. Several empirical and modeling studies have identified ocean variability as a primary driver of changes in the behavior of monsoon systems. Meanwhile, changes in land surface properties associated with land cover and land use change (LCLUC) could affect monsoon development and dynamics by influencing land–ocean heat contrasts as well as land–atmosphere interactions. In recent decades, the development of remote sensing technology enables the monitoring and detection of land surface dynamics from local to global scales. The abundant remote sensing data makes it possible to explicitly quantify the associations between different LCLUC types and monsoon variability/extremes. Livelihood systems of Asia are intrinsically linked with monsoon for its water resource requirements. Vagaries in monsoon characteristics affecting livelihood systems might lead to serious consequences like land use conversion, deforestation, rural–urban migration, and other socio-economic issues. Characterizing and contextualizing the societal impacts at various spatial scales will be useful to understand the climate–society nexus, as well as to unveil the processes of changing landscape in Asia. Given the significant human, economic, social, and environmental impacts of the Asian monsoons, we invite papers that provide insights into the interactions of land surface dynamics with the physical and societal aspects of monsoon climates in Asia.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Climate.

Dr. Eungul Lee
Dr. Yaqian He
Dr. Jothiganesh Shanmugasundaram
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Monsoon
  • Land cover and land use change
  • Society
  • Climate extremes
  • Climate–society nexus
  • Asia

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
Land Cover and Land Use Mapping of the East Asian Summer Monsoon Region from 1982 to 2015
Land 2022, 11(3), 391; https://doi.org/10.3390/land11030391 - 07 Mar 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1309
Abstract
Owing to the recent intensification of the East Asian summer monsoon, the frequency of floods and dry spells, which commonly affect more than one billion people, is continuously increasing. Thus, understanding the causes of changes in the EASM is paramount. Land cover and [...] Read more.
Owing to the recent intensification of the East Asian summer monsoon, the frequency of floods and dry spells, which commonly affect more than one billion people, is continuously increasing. Thus, understanding the causes of changes in the EASM is paramount. Land cover and land use change can perturb a regional climate system through biogeophysical and biogeochemical processes. However, due to the scarcity of temporally continuous land cover and land use maps, the impact of land cover and land use change on the EASM is still not thoroughly explored. In the present study, this limitation was addressed via the production of annual land cover and land use maps of the East Asian summer monsoon region covering a period of 34 years (1982–2015). This was achieved through a random forest classification of phenological information derived from the Advanced Very High-Resolution Radiometer Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies Normalized Difference Vegetation Index dataset and terrain information from the Advanced Land Observing Satellite World 3D—30 m Digital Surface Model data. Nine ecological zones were involved in the random forest classification and the classified map in 2015 was validated using very high-resolution images obtained from Google Earth. The overall accuracy (73%) of the classification map surpasses the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and Global Land Surface Satellite land cover products for the same year by ~7% and 4%, respectively. According to our classified maps, croplands and forests significantly increased in the East Asian summer monsoon region from 1982 to 2015. The dominant transition in these three decades was from croplands to forests. Full article
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Article
Effects of Cropland Expansion on Temperature Extremes in Western India from 1982 to 2015
Land 2021, 10(5), 489; https://doi.org/10.3390/land10050489 - 05 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1425
Abstract
India has experienced extensive land cover and land use change (LCLUC). However, there is still limited empirical research regarding the impact of LCLUC on climate extremes in India. Here, we applied statistical methods to assess how cropland expansion has influenced temperature extremes in [...] Read more.
India has experienced extensive land cover and land use change (LCLUC). However, there is still limited empirical research regarding the impact of LCLUC on climate extremes in India. Here, we applied statistical methods to assess how cropland expansion has influenced temperature extremes in India from 1982 to 2015 using a new land cover and land use dataset and ECMWF Reanalysis V5 (ERA5) climate data. Our results show that during the last 34 years, croplands in western India increased by ~33.7 percentage points. This cropland expansion shows a significantly negative impact on the maxima of daily maximum temperature (TXx), while its impacts on the maxima of daily minimum temperature and the minima of daily maximum and minimum temperature are limited. It is estimated that if cropland expansion had not taken place in western India over the 1982 to 2015 period, TXx would likely have increased by 0.74 (±0.64) °C. The negative impact of croplands on reducing the TXx extreme is likely due to evaporative cooling from intensified evapotranspiration associated with croplands, resulting in increased latent heat flux and decreased sensible heat flux. This study underscores the important influences of cropland expansion on temperature extremes and can be applicable to other geographic regions experiencing LCLUC. Full article
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