Spatio-Temporal Patterns of Land Use/Land Cover Change in Heterogeneous Coastal Landscapes

A special issue of Land (ISSN 2073-445X). This special issue belongs to the section "Landscape Ecology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2023) | Viewed by 4862

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Center for Environmental Studies (CES), Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, 3200 College Ave., Building DW-312, Davie, FL 33314, USA
Interests: climate change; vulnerability; human–environment geography

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Guest Editor
School of Geography, Clark University, Worcester, MA 01610, USA
Interests: Geographic Information Science (GIS); land change science; modelling statistics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Urban and Regional Planning, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL 33431, USA
Interests: sustainable transportation; planning; land use; resilience; transit oriented development

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The coastal zone is perhaps the world’s leading geographic setting for rapid urban development and population growth in the 21st Century. With this influx of people come a number of predictable changes in land use and in land cover. These settings are also the locus for mounting environmental risks, such as flooding induced by sea-level rise, and greater surge extents and depths from stronger storms. The result of overlaying these mounting risk profiles with the growing human and economic value also emerging in these locations is increasing vulnerability that may quickly outstrip the local society’s ability to prepare for and respond to the expected recurring damages, unless the underlying processes are better understood.

This Special Issue of Land will examine three facets of this process. In all instances, we seek outstanding contributions either as case studies or methodological developments.

  • Characterizing spatio-temporal changes in land use and land cover in coastal locations, both in the recent past and into the future, not restricted to a specific geographic region.
  • Understanding the drivers and impacts, as well as associated responses, of land use and land cover changes in coastal locations.
  • Exploration of evidence-based urban planning tools to better manage the dynamic coupled natural–human systems in growing coastal zones.

Dr. Colin Polsky
Prof. Dr. Robert Gilmore Pontius, Jr.
Dr. John Renne
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • land use and land cover change
  • vulnerability
  • coastal zone
  • environmental risks
  • urban development

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

36 pages, 3064 KiB  
Article
Multi-Scale Drivers of Land-Use Changes at Farm Level II: Application of Conceptual Framework in the Salinity Intrusion Zone of the Vietnamese Mekong Delta and Cross-Case Comparison with the Highly Flooded Zone
by Thuy Ngan Le, Arnold K. Bregt, Gerardo E. van Halsema, Petra J. G. J. Hellegers and Thi Thu Trang Ngo
Land 2023, 12(10), 1873; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12101873 - 4 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1132
Abstract
Frequent drought and worsening salinity intrusion challenge future land uses and livelihoods in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta. The central government is, therefore, formulating a new strategy premised on adaption to natural environmental dynamics. For an achievable strategy that bridges the gap between plans [...] Read more.
Frequent drought and worsening salinity intrusion challenge future land uses and livelihoods in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta. The central government is, therefore, formulating a new strategy premised on adaption to natural environmental dynamics. For an achievable strategy that bridges the gap between plans and practice, it is important to understand what drives land-use changes at the farm level. Previous research developed and applied a multi-scale drivers framework in the highly flooded zone of the delta. The current study uses that same framework to investigate the land-use history and drivers of change in the salinity intrusion zone of this delta from 1975 to 2016. We interviewed 32 farmers in Tra Vinh Province and used transcript analysis to quantify the influence of the drivers that the farmers mentioned. We then compared the drivers of land-use change with those found earlier in the highly flooded zone. Results show more diversification of land uses and land-use changes in the salinity intrusion zone. Farmers here followed three main pathways: rice intensification, integrated farming of rice and vegetables/aquaculture, or intensive shrimp farming. Land-use changes were conditional on the regional infrastructure construction to preserve freshwater conditions. However, household-scale drivers, especially natural and financial assets, were most frequently mentioned. Socio-economic context also emerged as an important driver, particularly trends and pressures from the community and markets. Full article
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32 pages, 2243 KiB  
Article
Multi-Scale Drivers of Land-Use Changes at Farm Level I: Conceptual Framework and Application in the Highly Flooded Zone of the Vietnamese Mekong Delta
by Thuy Ngan Le, Arnold K. Bregt, Gerardo E. van Halsema, Petra J. G. J. Hellegers and Thi Thu Trang Ngo
Land 2023, 12(7), 1273; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12071273 - 21 Jun 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1299
Abstract
There is an implementation gap between government plans and land-use changes at the local level in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta. This stands in the way of the sustainable development of the delta, especially in the face of environmental degradation, climate change, and water-use [...] Read more.
There is an implementation gap between government plans and land-use changes at the local level in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta. This stands in the way of the sustainable development of the delta, especially in the face of environmental degradation, climate change, and water-use conflicts. To narrow the gap between plans and practice, the government needs a better understanding of what drives land-use decisions at the farm level. Our research developed and applied a multi-scale framework to identify the principal drivers of land-use changes at the farm level in the Vietnamese Mekong Delta over the past 40 years. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 31 farmers in the highly flooded zone, then used transcript analysis to quantify the influence of the drivers mentioned by farmers. We found drastic shifts in land uses, predominantly towards rice intensification. Among the 43 change drivers the farmers mentioned, those operating at the regional scale were particularly influential, including the activities of local authorities, neighborhood effects, and the development of water management infrastructure. Market factors have become more prominent in the last two decades, motivating farmers to shift from double to triple rice or to gradually diversify into vegetables. However, agricultural diversification remains limited by the agro-hydrological context, which favors triple rice cropping, as well as household scale factors such as natural and physical assets of the farm, household capital, and labor capacity. The local community also played a key role in land-use change, though with a double-edged effect, both delaying implementation of central government policy and forcing farmers to follow the majority’s decision. Full article
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19 pages, 6580 KiB  
Article
Spatiotemporal Variation of Tidal Wetlands Affected by Human Activities during the Past 50 Years: A Case Study of Yueqing Bay in Eastern China
by Minghui Zhu, Xiaoming Xia, Yining Chen, Xinkai Wang, Yifei Liu, Ziyan Zhang and Jun Zheng
Land 2023, 12(4), 851; https://doi.org/10.3390/land12040851 - 8 Apr 2023
Viewed by 1512
Abstract
Monitoring spatiotemporal changes in tidal wetlands under the disturbance of human activities provides a strong basis for coastal wetland protection and restoration. Long-term serial remote sensing images and other historical data were collected and analysed to investigate the distribution of tidal wetlands of [...] Read more.
Monitoring spatiotemporal changes in tidal wetlands under the disturbance of human activities provides a strong basis for coastal wetland protection and restoration. Long-term serial remote sensing images and other historical data were collected and analysed to investigate the distribution of tidal wetlands of Yueqing Bay in 1969, 1981, 1993, 2003, 2013, and 2021, a case study across the past 50 years. The data revealed that human activities cumulatively caused the net loss of approximately 59.62 km2 in area of tidal wetlands during the observation period. Firstly, between 1969 and 1993, reclamation primarily accounted for the variation of the tidal wetlands. Furthermore, between 1993 and 2013, the invasion of Spartina alterniflora and mudflat aquaculture also became important influencing factors. Between 2013 and 2021, development activities eased, and mangrove planting area increased. Over the analysis period, the overall results revealed that the tidal wetlands in Yueqing Bay underwent a transformation process from the relatively simple effects of exploitation by reclamation to the collective influence of combined exploitation and restoration, increasing the overall diversity of Yueqing Bay tidal wetlands over the study period. Full article
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