Foreign Direct Investment & International Trade

A special issue of Journal of Risk and Financial Management (ISSN 1911-8074). This special issue belongs to the section "Financial Markets".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 5235

Special Issue Editor


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Economics, University of Molise, 86100 Campobasso, Italy
Interests: international trade theory and policy; gravity model of international trade; financial markets, firm internationalization; economics growth; applied econometrics
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The traditional view of international trade in which each country produces goods and offers services that are exported as products for consumers abroad is now a thing of the past. In today's global economy, global value chains (GVCs) have become a dominant feature of world trade as services, raw materials, parts, and components cross borders, often numerous times, and once they are assembled into their final products they are shipped to consumers around the world.

Most of the cross-border trade of inputs and outputs takes place within very complex international production networks involving foreign companies affiliated with the parent company (foreign branch, a foreign company acquired, etc.), partners with whom the multinational enterprises (MNEs) have entered into contractual relationships, or independent suppliers. As a result, the fragmentation of production and the growing role of multinational corporations in this process has profoundly changed the way products and services are produced and traded.

Analyses of the interlinkages between trade and investment have never been more important than they are now.

In particular, the research focuses of this Special Issue mainly concern:

  • The analysis of firm internationalization processes, with particular reference to the different types of internationalization;
  • The analysis of the determinants of bilateral trade flows, in relation to the characteristics of the production systems of individual countries, the characteristics of legal and institutional systems, and the matrix of bilateral relations;
  • The study of the interdependencies between trade and foreign direct investment (FDI) and their consequences on the GVCs.

This Special Issue intends to reach relevant actors involved in trade and investment policy design and implementation in the public sector and policymakers, as well as all stakeholders potentially interested in its results. Nevertheless, the target readership of the Special Issues is even broader, as it aims to provide a valuable tool in graduate teaching and for students with an interest in the firm’s internationalization models and analyses.

Prof. Dr. Maria Cipollina
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Risk and Financial Management is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • foreign direct investments
  • international trade
  • global value chains
  • firm internazionalization
  • trade and investment policies

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

29 pages, 2595 KiB  
Article
Is Foreign Direct Investment Resilient Post the COVID-19 Pandemic? The Case of a Subnational Economy
by Roxana Wright and Chen Wu
J. Risk Financial Manag. 2024, 17(1), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/jrfm17010021 - 05 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1419
Abstract
The disruption brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic has been unprecedented in its global reach and unique impacts. While the literature has addressed the disruption effect on FDI at the country level, we provide a unique dive into the presence and development of [...] Read more.
The disruption brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic has been unprecedented in its global reach and unique impacts. While the literature has addressed the disruption effect on FDI at the country level, we provide a unique dive into the presence and development of FDI at a subnational location. We use detailed data on spatial and industrial distributions of FDI in the U.S. state of New Hampshire and find support for all our hypotheses related to post-disruption recovery and resilience. Given the varied impact of the pandemic on FDI across locations, and the heterogeneity in local conditions, we contend that the subnational recovery depends on the impact of the disruption and happens at varying levels and timelines. While the literature documented that foreign businesses choose to embed in their local host environments, few studies have considered empirically how the level of local integration affects FDI recovery after disruption. We propose that subnational locations with a high level of integration maintain relative strength in FDI post-disruption. The COVID-19 pandemic disruption presents an opportunity to evaluate FDI resilience. We postulate that existing FDI and spatial agglomerations of FDI-related activities impact the post-disruption resilience of FDI at a subnational location. The analysis concludes on actionable insights for researchers and practitioners regarding how to navigate the FDI inflows and activities at their specific location. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foreign Direct Investment & International Trade)
Show Figures

Figure 1

31 pages, 1971 KiB  
Article
Do Aid for Trade Flows Affect Technology Licensing in Recipient Countries?
by Sèna Kimm Gnangnon
J. Risk Financial Manag. 2023, 16(12), 513; https://doi.org/10.3390/jrfm16120513 - 11 Dec 2023
Viewed by 1159
Abstract
There is an abundant literature on the economic (including trade) effects of Aid for Trade (AfT) flows. However, little attention has been devoted to the effect of AfT flows on demand for technology licensing. The present article aims to fill this void in [...] Read more.
There is an abundant literature on the economic (including trade) effects of Aid for Trade (AfT) flows. However, little attention has been devoted to the effect of AfT flows on demand for technology licensing. The present article aims to fill this void in the literature by investigating the effect of AfT flows on technology licensing in developing countries. The analysis has used an unbalanced panel dataset of 77 countries over the period from 2002 to 2019 and mainly the two-step generalized method of moments estimator. It has been established that AfT flows foster technology licensing in countries that experience lower trade costs. In addition, the analysis has revealed that adverse environmental and external (economic and financial) shocks significantly hamper innovation, including the demand for technology licensing, and that AfT flows promote technology licensing in countries that experience lower magnitudes of such shocks. Finally, AfT flows foster technology licensing in countries that diversify export products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foreign Direct Investment & International Trade)
Show Figures

Figure 1

53 pages, 2624 KiB  
Article
Effect of the Duration of Membership in the World Trade Organization on Trademark Applications
by Sena Kimm Gnangnon
J. Risk Financial Manag. 2023, 16(10), 426; https://doi.org/10.3390/jrfm16100426 - 25 Sep 2023
Viewed by 913
Abstract
This article has examined the effect of the duration of membership in the World Trade Organization (WTO) on the submission of trademarks by countries’ residents. The analysis used an unbalanced sample of 124 countries (including developed and developing countries) and, primarily, the binominal [...] Read more.
This article has examined the effect of the duration of membership in the World Trade Organization (WTO) on the submission of trademarks by countries’ residents. The analysis used an unbalanced sample of 124 countries (including developed and developing countries) and, primarily, the binominal regression approach supplemented by the generalized method of moments estimator, which was utilized for the robustness check. Results have shown that the effect of the duration of WTO membership on trademarks works through the channel of trade costs. This effect is positive for less developed economies and negative for relatively advanced economies. These findings reflect the fact that as countries spend more time as WTO members, they experience a higher submission of patents in relation to trademarks, especially if they enjoy an improvement in their real per capita income (and export complex products). Furthermore, countries that receive higher Aid for Trade flows (which help to reduce trade costs) experience yet a higher number of trademark applications, but to a lesser extent than patent filings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foreign Direct Investment & International Trade)
Show Figures

Figure 1

32 pages, 2210 KiB  
Article
Duration of the Membership in the GATT/WTO, Structural Economic Vulnerability and Trade Costs
by Sena Kimm Gnangnon
J. Risk Financial Manag. 2023, 16(6), 282; https://doi.org/10.3390/jrfm16060282 - 24 May 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1227
Abstract
This paper assesses the effects of the duration of membership in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)/World Trade Organization (WTO) and structural economic vulnerability on trade costs in developing countries. The analysis is performed on an unbalanced panel dataset of 121 [...] Read more.
This paper assesses the effects of the duration of membership in the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)/World Trade Organization (WTO) and structural economic vulnerability on trade costs in developing countries. The analysis is performed on an unbalanced panel dataset of 121 countries over the period 1996–2018 and primarily utilizes the two-step system generalized method of moments estimator. It has established several findings. We obtain that longstanding GATT/WTO members enjoy a larger reduction in trade costs than relatively new GATT/WTO members. Concomitantly, a higher degree of structural economic vulnerability leads to higher trade costs. Moreover, the membership duration exerts a higher trade costs reduction effect in countries that are highly “structurally” vulnerable, including those that face high levels of exposure to shocks and high magnitudes of shocks. Finally, longstanding GATT/WTO members that receive higher amounts of development aid (including total development aid flows, Aid for Trade flows, and NonAfT flows) enjoy a larger trade costs reduction than relatively new GATT/WTO members. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Foreign Direct Investment & International Trade)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop