Application of Fungi and Their Secondary Metabolites for Pest Management

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X). This special issue belongs to the section "Fungi in Agriculture and Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2024) | Viewed by 4678

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
College of Plant Protection, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642, China
Interests: interaction of insects with entomopathogenic fungus and its mycotoxin; mycoinsecticide; metarhizium; entomopathogenic fungi; fungal biocontrol agents

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Guest Editor
Department of Phytotoxicology and Biotechnology, All-Russian Research Institute of Plant Protection, 196608 Saint Petersburg, Russia
Interests: mycoherbicides; phytotoxins; natural herbicides; insecticidal properties of fungal plant pathogens; mycotoxin
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Associate Dean for Research Innovation and Social Engagement, Prince of Songkla University, Songkhla 90110, Thailand
Interests: plant pathogenic fungi; fungal biocontrol agents; insect biodiversity; fungal biodiversity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to present recent research on any aspect of fungi and their secondary metabolites, which can be used for pest biocontrol in agriculture and forestry. Reviews, original research, and communications are welcome. This issue will be focused on, among other relevant topics: (1) entomopathogenic fungi or mycoinsecticides; (2) mycoparasitic fungi or mycofungicides; (3) weed-parasitic fungi or mycoherbicides; (4) nematophagous fungi or myconematocides; and (5) fungal secondary metabolites used to control insects, weeds, plant disease, and nematodes.

Prof. Dr. Qiongbo Hu
Dr. Alexander Berestetskiy
Dr. Narit Thaochan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biocontrol
  • entomopathogen
  • fungi
  • mycoparasite
  • mycofungicide
  • mycoinsecticide
  • myconematocide
  • mycoherbicide
  • nematophagous fungi
  • secondary metabolite
  • pest
  • weed-parasitic fungi

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 6724 KiB  
Article
Metabolomics Analysis of Sporulation-Associated Metabolites of Metarhizium anisopliae Based on Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry
by Hua Yang, Longyan Tian, Hualong Qiu, Changsheng Qin, Siquan Ling and Jinzhu Xu
J. Fungi 2023, 9(10), 1011; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof9101011 - 13 Oct 2023
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Abstract
Metarhizium anisopliae, an entomopathogenic fungus, has been widely used for the control of agricultural and forestry pests. However, sporulation degeneration occurs frequently during the process of successive culture, and we currently lack a clear understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In this study, [...] Read more.
Metarhizium anisopliae, an entomopathogenic fungus, has been widely used for the control of agricultural and forestry pests. However, sporulation degeneration occurs frequently during the process of successive culture, and we currently lack a clear understanding of the underlying mechanisms. In this study, the metabolic profiles of M. anisopliae were comparatively analyzed based on the metabolomics approach of gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS). A total of 74 metabolites were detected in both normal and degenerate strains, with 40 differential metabolites contributing significantly to the model. Principal component analysis (PCA) and potential structure discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) showed a clear distinction between the sporulation of normal strains and degenerate strains. Specifically, 23 metabolites were down-regulated and 17 metabolites were up-regulated in degenerate strains compared to normal strains. The KEGG enrichment analysis identified 47 significant pathways. Among them, the alanine, aspartate and glutamate metabolic pathways and the glycine, serine and threonine metabolism had the most significant effects on sporulation, which revealed that significant changes occur in the metabolic phenotypes of strains during sporulation and degeneration processes. Furthermore, our subsequent experiments have substantiated that the addition of amino acids could improve M. anisopliae’s spore production. Our study shows that metabolites, especially amino acids, which are significantly up-regulated or down-regulated during the sporulation and degeneration of M. anisopliae, may be involved in the sporulation process of M. anisopliae, and amino acid metabolism (especially glutamate, aspartate, serine, glycine, arginine and leucine) may be an important part of the sporulation mechanism of M. anisopliae. This study provides a foundation and technical support for rejuvenation and production improvement strategies for M. anisopliae. Full article
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15 pages, 2887 KiB  
Article
Reconstruction of Gut Bacteria in Spodoptera frugiperda Infected by Beauveria bassiana Affects the Survival of Host Pest
by Yuejin Peng, Shaohai Wen, Guang Wang, Xu Zhang, Teng Di, Guangzu Du, Bin Chen and Limin Zhang
J. Fungi 2023, 9(9), 906; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof9090906 - 6 Sep 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1138
Abstract
Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a migratory agricultural pest that is devastating on a global scale. Beauveria bassiana is a filamentous entomopathogenic fungus that has a strong pathogenic effect on Lepidoptera pests but little is known about the microbial community in the host [...] Read more.
Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a migratory agricultural pest that is devastating on a global scale. Beauveria bassiana is a filamentous entomopathogenic fungus that has a strong pathogenic effect on Lepidoptera pests but little is known about the microbial community in the host gut and the dominant populations in fungus-infected insects. B. bassiana AJS91881 was isolated and identified from the infected larvae of Spodoptera litura. The virulence of AJS91881 to the eggs, larvae, pupae and adults of S. frugiperda was measured. Moreover, the gut microbial community diversity of healthy and fungus-infected insects was analyzed. Our results showed that after treatment with B. bassiana AJS91881, the egg hatching rate, larval survival rate and adult lifespan of the insects were significantly reduced, and the pupae rigor rate was significantly increased compared to that of the control group. Additionally, the gut microbial community was reconstructed after B. bassiana infection. At the phylum and genus level, the relative abundance of the Proteobacteria and Serratia increased significantly in the B. bassiana treatment group. The KEGG function prediction results showed that fungal infection affected insect gut metabolism, environmental information processing, genetic information processing, organism systems and cellular processes. Fungal infection was closely related to the metabolism of various substances in the insect gut. Serratia marcescens was the bacterium with the highest relative abundance after infection by B. bassiana; intestinal bacteria S. marcescens inhibited the infection of insect fungi B. bassiana against the S. frugiperda. The presence of gut bacteria also significantly reduced the virulence of the fungi against the insects when compared to the group with the larvae fed antibiotics that were infected with fungal suspension (Germfree, GF) and healthy larvae that were infected with fungal suspension prepared with an antibiotic solution (+antibiotic). In conclusion, the reconstruction of the insect intestinal bacterial community is an indispensable link for understanding the pathogenicity of B. bassiana against S. frugiperda. Most importantly, in the later stage of fungal infection, the increased abundance of S. marcescens in the insect intestine inhibited the virulence of B. bassiana to some extent. The findings aid in understanding changes in the gut microbiota during the early stages of entomopathogenic fungal infection of insects and the involvement of insect gut microbes in host defense mediated by pathogenic fungal infection. This study is also conducive to understanding the interaction between entomopathogenic fungi, hosts and gut microbes, and provides a new idea for the joint use of entomopathogenic fungi and gut bacteria to control pests. Full article
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Review

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18 pages, 531 KiB  
Review
The Registration Situation and Use of Mycopesticides in the World
by Yali Jiang and Jingjing Wang
J. Fungi 2023, 9(9), 940; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof9090940 - 16 Sep 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1953
Abstract
Mycopesticides are living preparations that use fungal cells, such as spores and hyphae, as active ingredients. They mainly include mycoinsecticides, mycofungicides, mycoherbicides and nematophagous fungi. The utilization of fungi for controlling agricultural pests can be traced back to approximately 1880, when entomopathogenic fungi [...] Read more.
Mycopesticides are living preparations that use fungal cells, such as spores and hyphae, as active ingredients. They mainly include mycoinsecticides, mycofungicides, mycoherbicides and nematophagous fungi. The utilization of fungi for controlling agricultural pests can be traced back to approximately 1880, when entomopathogenic fungi were initially employed for this purpose. However, it was not until 1965 that the world’s first mycopesticide, Beauveria bassiana, was registered as Boverin® in the former Soviet Union. In past decades, numerous novel mycopesticides have been developed for their lower R&D costs, as well as the environmentally friendly and safe nature. In this review, we investigated the mycopesticides situation of registration in USA, EU, China, Canada and Australia. Superisingly, it was found that the registered mycopesticides are extremely raised in recent years. Currently, the insecticides, fungicides (nematocides) and herbicides were respectively registered 27, 53 and 8 fungal strains. This paper also analyzes the main problems currently faced by mycopesticides and offers suggestions for their future development. Full article
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