Fungal Infections in Dermatology 2.0

A special issue of Journal of Fungi (ISSN 2309-608X). This special issue belongs to the section "Fungal Pathogenesis and Disease Control".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 January 2024) | Viewed by 3107

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Guest Editor
Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Wroclaw Medcial Unieversity, ul. T. Chałubińskiego 1, 50-367 Wroclaw, Poland
Interests: systemic itch; uremic pruritus; itch in dermatoses; skin and psyche
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The skin is the largest organ of the body and has a complex structure. It supports body organs and plays an important role in maintaining the immune system. Fungal diseases majorly affect the skin through different mechanisms. Thus, recent resistance to some common antifungal agents has raised concern in relation to the management of these diseases. This Special Issue of the Journal of Fungi entitled "Fungal Infections in Dermatology 2.0" aims to present recent research on any aspect of fungal skin diseases. Some focal points may include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Dermatophytes;
  2. Nail fungus;
  3. Hair fungus;
  4. Oral thrush.

Reviews, original research and communications are all welcome.

Dr. Mohamad Goldust
Prof. Dr. Jacek C. Szepietowski
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Fungi is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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16 pages, 3520 KiB  
Article
Sporotrichosis in Older Adults: A Cohort Study of 911 Patients from a Hyperendemic Area of Zoonotic Transmission in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
by Rachel da Silva Ribeiro Gomes, Antonio Carlos Francesconi do Valle, Dayvison Francis Saraiva Freitas, Priscila Marques de Macedo, Raquel de Vasconcellos Carvalhaes Oliveira, Rodrigo Almeida-Paes, Rosely Maria Zancopé-Oliveira and Maria Clara Gutierrez-Galhardo
J. Fungi 2023, 9(8), 804; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof9080804 - 30 Jul 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1051
Abstract
Generally, older people tend to suffer from more severe infections than younger adults. In addition, there are accumulations of comorbidities and immune senescence in some cases. This cohort study evaluated the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of older adults (≥60 years old) with sporotrichosis. [...] Read more.
Generally, older people tend to suffer from more severe infections than younger adults. In addition, there are accumulations of comorbidities and immune senescence in some cases. This cohort study evaluated the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of older adults (≥60 years old) with sporotrichosis. The cohort consisted of 911 patients with a median age of 67 years, most of whom were female (72.6%), white (62.1%), and afflicted with comorbidities (64.5%). The lymphocutaneous form occurred in 62% of the patients, followed by the fixed form (25.7%), cutaneous disseminated form (8.9%), and extracutaneous/disseminated forms (3.3%). In this study, we draw attention to the frequency of osteoarticular involvement (2.1%) secondary to skin lesions such as osteomyelitis and/or tenosynovitis. A clinical cure was achieved in 87.3% of cases. Itraconazole was used in 81.1% of cases, while terbinafine was used in 22.7% of cases, usually in low doses. Survival analysis showed that the median treatment time was 119 days, and the multiple Cox model demonstrated that the presentation of a black coloration and diabetes was associated with a longer treatment time required to establish a cure. Therefore, these subgroups should be monitored more closely to reduce possible difficulties during treatment. It would be interesting to conduct more studies analyzing older adults with sporotrichosis from different geographic areas to better comprehend the disease in this group. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Infections in Dermatology 2.0)
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10 pages, 1393 KiB  
Case Report
First Reported Case of a Clinically Nonresponsive-to-Itraconazole Alternaria alternata Isolated from a Skin Infection of a Nonimmunocompromised Patient from Romania
by Ioana Alina Colosi, Maria Crișan, Dan Alexandru Țoc, Horațiu Alexandru Colosi, Carmen Georgiu, Marcela Sabou and Carmen Costache
J. Fungi 2023, 9(8), 839; https://doi.org/10.3390/jof9080839 - 11 Aug 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1421
Abstract
Background: Alternaria alternata is a melanic fungus capable of causing a wide variety of infections, some of which have lethal potential. It is a ubiquitous fungus and a well-known plant pathogen. Cutaneous infections with Alternaria alternata most often occur in the extremities of [...] Read more.
Background: Alternaria alternata is a melanic fungus capable of causing a wide variety of infections, some of which have lethal potential. It is a ubiquitous fungus and a well-known plant pathogen. Cutaneous infections with Alternaria alternata most often occur in the extremities of patients who perform conventional agriculture, thus being exposed to occupational hazards leading to the disruption of the skin barrier. Methods: This paper presents the first case report from Romania of an itraconazole nonresponsive cutaneous alternariosis in a patient without any type of immunosuppression. Results: After an initial misdiagnosis regarding the etiology of the patient’s skin infection, two successive punch biopsies, followed by mycologic examination, lead to the final diagnosis of cutaneous alternariosis. Treatment guided by antifungal susceptibility testing has been instituted, leading to the gradual healing of the patient’s skin ulcerations. Conclusions: The ability of Alternaria alternata to infect immunocompetent human hosts and to develop resistance to antifungal drugs highlight the importance of correctly diagnosing the etiology of skin ulcerations and instituting appropriate treatment guided by antifungal susceptibility testing whenever the suspicion of a fungal skin infection is plausible. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fungal Infections in Dermatology 2.0)
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