COVID-19 in Medicine

A special issue of Healthcare (ISSN 2227-9032).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2022) | Viewed by 7873

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Dermatology Unit, Department of Biomedical, Surgical and Dental Sciences, University of Milan, 20122 Milan, Italy
Interests: special populations; stigmatization and psychodermatology; hidradenitis suppurativa; systemic inflammation; dermatoepidemiology; multi-omics integration; machine learning; artificial intelligence; big data; biologics; systemic treatments
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has caused a huge strain on healthcare workers, patients, as well as on the general public—physically, financially, and psychologically. How far this illness may progress is a situation that is hard to predict. In this context, the editors of Healthcare have set up a Special Issue dedicated to various aspects of this pandemic and updates on the clinical spectrum of the disease.

Dr. Giovanni Damiani
Dr. Mohamad Goldust
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • COVID-19 pathophysiology
  • COVID-19 epidemiology
  • COVID-19 treatment
  • COVID-19 management
  • COVID-19 prognosis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

8 pages, 1250 KiB  
Article
The COVID-19 Pandemic in Romania: A Comparative Description with Its Border Countries
by Bianca Georgiana Enciu, Alina Andreea Tănase, Anca Cristina Drăgănescu, Victoria Aramă, Daniela Pițigoi and Maria-Dorina Crăciun
Healthcare 2022, 10(7), 1223; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10071223 - 30 Jun 2022
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2127
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to be a major public health problem in most countries of the world, especially in developing countries with an underfunded healthcare system. We aim to present a comparative profile of the epidemiological characteristics of the COVID-19 pandemic in Romania [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic continues to be a major public health problem in most countries of the world, especially in developing countries with an underfunded healthcare system. We aim to present a comparative profile of the epidemiological characteristics of the COVID-19 pandemic in Romania and neighboring countries, which have similar onset and a similar socio-cultural pattern. A descriptive comparative study was performed using COVID-19 data collected from various official websites regarding demography, morbidity, mortality, vaccination, and testing capacity. The countries included in the study were Romania, Bulgaria, Hungary, Republic of Moldova, Serbia, and Ukraine. The study period was from week 09/2020 to week 46/2021. Overall, these countries have reported 8,382,441 cases and 216,014 deaths (during the study period). The highest cumulative incidence rate of cases has been recorded in Serbia (17,801.5) and the highest mortality rate has been recorded in Bulgaria (391.0). Romania is in fourth place regarding the cumulative incidence rate of cases/100,000 inhabitants but in third place regarding the mortality due to COVID-19 (case–fatality rate of 3.1%). Although the World Health Organization and EU co-ordinate the COVID-19 response, each state makes its own decisions regarding SARS-CoV-2 mitigation measures, the epidemiological indicators directing us about the effectiveness of responses. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19 in Medicine)
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9 pages, 468 KiB  
Article
Clinical Factors Associated with COVID-19 Severity in Chronic Hospitalized Infants and Toddlers: Data from a Center in the West Part of Romania
by Alina Domnicu, Mirela Mogoi, Aniko Manea, Eugen Radu Boia and Marioara Boia
Healthcare 2022, 10(5), 808; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10050808 - 27 Apr 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1490
Abstract
Background: The risk factors for developing a severe form of COVID-19 in young children are poorly understood. Methods: A single-center retrospective study was conducted to quantify and analyze the clinical risk profile of children admitted to the Pediatric Clinic for Nutritional Recovery. Results: [...] Read more.
Background: The risk factors for developing a severe form of COVID-19 in young children are poorly understood. Methods: A single-center retrospective study was conducted to quantify and analyze the clinical risk profile of children admitted to the Pediatric Clinic for Nutritional Recovery. Results: Overall, 51.5% (n = 17) of children were infected with SARS-CoV-2, all symptomatic, and five of them (29.4%) developed a severe form. A positive clinical pulmonary exam was only associated with the severe outcome (OR: 2.00; 95% CI, 0.33–5.66; p = 0.02). Other factors such as age under 3 months, prematurity, birth weight, malnutrition or positive history of congenital cardiac, neurodevelopmental, or genetic diseases, fever, temperature, cough, and digestive symptoms were not found to be significant risk factors. Conclusions: Clinical guidelines based on risk stratification for SARS-CoV-2 infection in children are needed in order to manage, monitor and establish priority access for some groups to high medical care. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19 in Medicine)
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11 pages, 247 KiB  
Article
Nurses and Stigma at the Time of COVID-19: A Phenomenological Study
by Silvio Simeone, Teresa Rea, Assunta Guillari, Ercole Vellone, Rosaria Alvaro and Gianluca Pucciarelli
Healthcare 2022, 10(1), 25; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10010025 - 24 Dec 2021
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 3269
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic is putting strain on every country in the world and their health systems. Healthcare professionals struggle on the frontline and they can experience stigma, which can create difficulties in controlling epidemic diseases, influencing the mental health of healthcare professionals, caregivers, [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic is putting strain on every country in the world and their health systems. Healthcare professionals struggle on the frontline and they can experience stigma, which can create difficulties in controlling epidemic diseases, influencing the mental health of healthcare professionals, caregivers, families, communities, and the provided quality of care. The aim of this study is to explore the lived experience of Italian nurses about perceived stigma during COVID-19 pandemic with the phenomenological Cohen method. The principal themes that emerged from data analysis were “stigma in the working environment” and “stigma in everyday life”. Each of these themes had subthemes: “looks like gun sights”, “avoiding closeness to others”, “nobody wants to touch you”, and “the fault of being your family members”. Public health emergencies, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, are stressful events for individuals and communities. Stigma can be more dangerous than the disease, and a major obstacle to appropriate medical and mental health interventions. Understanding how healthcare professionals experience stigma is essential to design and implement specific educational, psychological, and organisational programmes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue COVID-19 in Medicine)
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