Topic Editors

Prof. Dr. Jacek C. Szepietowski
Department of Dermatology, Venereology and Allergology, Wroclaw Medcial Unieversity, ul. T. Chałubińskiego 1, 50-367 Wroclaw, Poland
Prof. Dr. Lucia Tomas-Aragones
Department of Psychology, Faculty of Education University of Zaragoza, Aragon Health Sciences Institute (IACS), 50009 Zaragoza, Spain

Psychodermatology

Abstract submission deadline
closed (15 August 2021)
Manuscript submission deadline
closed (15 October 2021)
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Topic Information

Dear Colleagues,

Psychodermatology is a rapidly growing field. It combines dermatologic, psychiatric, and psychologic symptomatology. Skin diseases, due to their chronicity, visibility, and frequently occurring subjective symptoms, especially itch, predispose patients to develop secondary psychiatric disturbances, like depression and/or anxiety. This definitely influences coping strategies for dermatology patients. Many skin diseases are stress-induced ones, as psychological stress exacerbates skin conditions. Although skin disorders are mostly not life threatening, they heavily influence patients’ quality of life. All the domains, including physical, mental, and social functioning are affected. Moreover, patients with skin diseases present with increased level of stigmatization. One can also underline that dermatologists are quite frequently confronted with psychiatric disturbances with cutaneous manifestations or cutaneous imaginary symptoms. Within this group of so-called psychodermatoses, let us mention trichotillomania, onychotillomania, or delusional parasitosis. Another important, not enough deeply studied problem, are self-inflicted lesions in dermatology, previously called dermatitis artefacta. The aim of this Special Issue is to offer the platform for discussing all above mentioned problems within clinicians and basic science researches. We do hope that published papers will contribute to better the understanding of bilateral connections between skin and psyche and will be beneficial for a holistic approach to our patients.

Prof. Dr. Jacek C Szepietowski
Prof. Dr. Lucia Tomas-Aragones
Topics Editors

Article processing charge will be waived for all accepted manuscripts in Psych from 15 April to 31 October 2021.

Participating Journals

Journal Name Impact Factor CiteScore Launched Year First Decision (median) APC
Life
life
3.253 1.9 2011 13.4 Days 1800 CHF
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
ijerph
4.614 4.5 2004 20.1 Days 2500 CHF
Psych
psych
- - 2019 22.4 Days 1200 CHF

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Published Papers (6 papers)

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Article
A Pilot Study of a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Programme in Patients Suffering from Atopic Dermatitis
Psych 2021, 3(4), 663-672; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych3040042 - 17 Nov 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1921
Abstract
Introduction: Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have several potential stressors including the symptoms of the disease itself, the stigmatization due to their appearance, and emotional and psychological strain. Psychological factors and stress can trigger and exacerbate the symptoms of skin diseases and there [...] Read more.
Introduction: Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) have several potential stressors including the symptoms of the disease itself, the stigmatization due to their appearance, and emotional and psychological strain. Psychological factors and stress can trigger and exacerbate the symptoms of skin diseases and there is evidence that stress has a relevant clinical effect on the function of skin cells in vivo. Our objective was to evaluate in a pilot study the feasibility, acceptance, and effectiveness of a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) programme in AD patients in a clinical setting. Methods: 10 patients took part in an 8-week MBSR programme, which included, e.g., mindful and conscious awareness of the body and bodywork, and seated meditation. We assessed sociodemographics and disease related variables with standardized measures at predefined time points including Score of Atopic Dermatitis, Patient Oriented Eczema Measure, Dermatology Life Quality Index, Perceived Stress Questionnaire, Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory (FMI), and others. Participants also gave qualitative feedback regarding the effects of the intervention. Results: The mean age was 53.10 years (SD = 15.04), seven patients were female, and disease duration was 36.6 years (SD = 25.5). Calculating pre-post effect sizes (Cohen’s d), the FMI indicated significant improvement in the “presence” and “acceptance” subscales. There was also tendency for less stress. This was confirmed by the qualitative statements of the participants. Conclusions: The MBSR programme is feasible and acceptable for AD patients. Considering the long disease history and the severity of disease burden, the effects of this intervention seem promising as an adjunct to conventional treatments for patients with AD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Psychodermatology)
Article
The Sociotype of Dermatological Patients: Assessing the Social Burden of Skin Disease
Psych 2021, 3(3), 348-359; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych3030026 - 03 Aug 2021
Viewed by 1211
Abstract
Skin diseases can be the cause of a significant psychosocial burden. However, tools to screen for social interaction difficulties and diminished social networks that affect the wellbeing and mental health of the individual have not been sufficiently developed. This study is based on [...] Read more.
Skin diseases can be the cause of a significant psychosocial burden. However, tools to screen for social interaction difficulties and diminished social networks that affect the wellbeing and mental health of the individual have not been sufficiently developed. This study is based on the sociotype approach, which has recently been proposed as a new theoretical construct implemented in the form of an ad hoc questionnaire that examines the social bonding structures and relational factors. A pilot study was conducted in Alcañiz Hospital (Spain), with a study population of 159 dermatology patients. The results showed that in both subjective estimates concerning family, friends, work, and acquaintances, and in quantitative aspects, such as social contacts, duration of conversations, and moments of laughter, there were significant differences between the sample regarding diagnostic severity, dermatological diseases, and gender. The sociotype questionnaire (SOCQ) is a useful tool to screen for social difficulties in dermatological patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Psychodermatology)
Article
Psychometric Properties of Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire-15 for Predicting Suicidal Ideation among Migrant Industrial Workers in China
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7583; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147583 - 16 Jul 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1516
Abstract
Objective: Interpersonal theories of suicide suggest that the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire (INQ) can be used to measure suicidal ideation, but few studies have focused on migrant people, a group with a high prevalence of suicidal ideation. The aim of this study was to [...] Read more.
Objective: Interpersonal theories of suicide suggest that the Interpersonal Needs Questionnaire (INQ) can be used to measure suicidal ideation, but few studies have focused on migrant people, a group with a high prevalence of suicidal ideation. The aim of this study was to validate the psychometric properties of the INQ-15 and its prediction of suicidal ideation among migrant industrial workers in China. Method: A stratified multi-stage sample of 2023 industrial workers was recruited from 16 factories in Shenzhen, China. There were 1805 nonlocal workers, which we defined as migrant workers with a mean age of 32.50 ± 8.43 years old who were 67.3% male. The structure of the Chinese version of the INQ-15 and its correlation and predictive utility for suicidal ideation were examined through factor analysis, the Item Response Theory, the M2 test, logistic regression, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results: Different from studies among various samples in which a two-factor solution is identified, results within this sample indicated three factors: perceived burdensomeness, thwarted belongingness, and social isolation. The model fit statistics of three-factor INQ were 0.075 for RMSEA, 0.945 for CFI, 0.932 for TLI, and 0.067 for SRMR. The model standard estimated factor loadings ranged from 0.366 to 0.869. The summed scores of INQ and perceived burdensomeness predicted suicidal ideation after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics such as age, gender, and income with AUC of 0.733 (95% CI: 0.712/0.754) and 0.786 (95% CI: 0.766/0.804). In the meantime, the comparison of the predictive ability between INQ total scores and PB scores was significant with p < 0.05. Conclusion: The INQ has good psychometric properties and can be used to assess how migrant workers living in the Shenzhen perceive meeting interpersonal psychological needs and shows good predictive ability of suicidal ideation. Perceived burdensomeness appears to play a role in suicide and may be a point of intervention, yet the notable deviation from previous findings and the relative weakness of two of the other factors warrant further study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Psychodermatology)
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Review
Tattoos in Psychodermatology
Psych 2021, 3(3), 269-278; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych3030021 - 06 Jul 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3174
Abstract
Tattooing is a permanent form of body art applied onto the skin with a decorative ink, and it has been practiced from antiquity until today. The number of tattooed people is steadily increasing as tattoos have become popular all over the world, especially [...] Read more.
Tattooing is a permanent form of body art applied onto the skin with a decorative ink, and it has been practiced from antiquity until today. The number of tattooed people is steadily increasing as tattoos have become popular all over the world, especially in Western countries. Tattoos display distinctive designs and images, from protective totems and tribal symbols to the names of loved or lost persons or strange figures, which are used as a means of self-expression. They are worn on the skin as a lifelong commitment, and everyone has their own reasons to become tattooed, whether they be simply esthetic or a proclamation of group identity. Tattoos are representations of one’s feelings, unconscious conflicts, and inner life onto the skin. The skin plays a major role in this representation and is involved in different ways in this process. This article aims to review the historical and psychoanalytical aspects of tattoos, the reasons for and against tattooing, medical and dermatological implications of the practice, and emotional reflections from a psychodermatological perspective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Psychodermatology)
Article
Social Support and Appearance Satisfaction Can Predict Changes in the Psychopathology Levels of Patients with Acne, Psoriasis and Eczema, before Dermatological Treatment and in a Six-Month Follow-up Phase
Psych 2021, 3(3), 259-268; https://doi.org/10.3390/psych3030020 - 01 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1636
Abstract
This was a cross-sectional study which assessed the factors that predicted changes in the levels of psychopathological symptomatology of patients with acne, psoriasis and eczema both before dermatological treatment and in a six-month follow-up phase. One hundred and eight dermatological patients (18–35 years) [...] Read more.
This was a cross-sectional study which assessed the factors that predicted changes in the levels of psychopathological symptomatology of patients with acne, psoriasis and eczema both before dermatological treatment and in a six-month follow-up phase. One hundred and eight dermatological patients (18–35 years) participated in the study; 54 with visible facial cystic acne (Group A), and 54 with non-visible psoriasis/eczema (Group B). A battery of self-report questionnaires were administered to all patients before their dermatological treatment and in a six-month follow-up phase and included: the Symptom Checklist-90 Revised (SCL-90-R), the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISEL-40), the Multidimensional Body–Self Relations Questionnaire (MBSRQ–AS) and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale. Multiple regression analyses revealed that patients’ overall perceived social support and overall appearance satisfaction appeared to be strong predictors of the maintenance of patients’ psychopathology levels, even six months after they began their dermatological treatment. Psychosocial factors such as patients’ social support and appearance satisfaction could influence their psychopathology levels and the way they experienced their skin condition, before treatment and after a six-month period of time. The psychological assessment of the aforementioned factors could detect patients who would benefit from psychotherapeutic interventions in order to help them adapt to the extra burden which accompanies dermatological disorders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Psychodermatology)
Article
Patient Reported Outcome Measure in Atopic Dermatitis Patients Treated with Dupilumab: 52-Weeks Results
Life 2021, 11(7), 617; https://doi.org/10.3390/life11070617 - 25 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1240
Abstract
Dupilumab is used to treat atopic dermatitis (AD) patients who have proven to be refractory to previous treatments. The aim of this study was to assess evolution and patient reported outcome measures in adult patients with moderate-to-severe AD treated with dupilumab in routine [...] Read more.
Dupilumab is used to treat atopic dermatitis (AD) patients who have proven to be refractory to previous treatments. The aim of this study was to assess evolution and patient reported outcome measures in adult patients with moderate-to-severe AD treated with dupilumab in routine clinical practice. The outcomes were evaluated and registered at baseline and weeks 16, 40 and 52. The variables evaluated were: disease severity, pruritus, stressful life events, difficulty to sleep, anxiety and depression, quality of life, satisfaction, adherence to the treatment, efficacy and safety. Eleven patients were recruited between 14 Nov 2017 and 16 Jan 2018. Demographic variables: 90% Caucasian, 82% women. Clinical variables: Mean duration of AD = 17.7 (±12.8), 91% had severe disease severity. At baseline, SCORAD median (range) score = 69.2 (34.8–89.2); itch was reported by 100% of patients; itch visual analogue scale median (range) was 9 (6–10); HADS median (range) total score = 13 (5–21); DLQI mean score = 16 (2–27); EQ-5D-3L median (range) = 57 (30–99). At week-52 there was a significant reduction of SCORAD scores median (range) = 4.3 (0–17.1), HADS total score median (range) = 2 (0–10) and improved quality of life EQ-5D-3L median (range) = 89 (92–60). This study confirms that dupilumab, used for 52-weeks under routine clinical practice, maintains the improved atopic dermatitis signs and symptoms obtained at week 16, with a good safety profile. Full article
(This article belongs to the Topic Psychodermatology)
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