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Prevention and Digital Health in Dermatology

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Skin Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 27441

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
General and Oncological Surgery Clinic I, Greater Poland Cancer Center, 61-866 Poznań, Poland
Interests: dermatoscopy; basal cell carcinoma; melanoma; skin cancer; total body mapping; artificial intelligence; cancerogenesis; autoimmunity
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Globalization, the pandemic, and the renaissance of artificial intelligence became key factors influencing the development of digital health. The prospect of online systems that are easily accessible from home is attractive both to patients and physicians, especially during the pandemic. With the implementation of teledermatology, numerous barriers limiting patient access to healthcare could be addressed (inaccessible or low-populated regions, jails, immobile, elderly, or handicapped patients). We should consider integrating digital remote systems and social media into our everyday agendas concerning patient needs (AI-assisted skin diseases prevention, education via websites and social media, teleconsultations, case teleconferences, and monitoring), health professionals (online scientific meetings, workshops and webinars, online task groups and research groups), and organizational issues (data storage, the multidirectional flow of complete e-documentation between the specialties, including telepathology and videodermatoscopy; automated appointment reminder service, databases on rare skin diseases and high-risk patients, AI-assisted mobile examination cabins). Both the industry and national healthcare providers became interested in developing e-Health solutions, yet even with some lessons learned, there are still no definitive answers on the cost-effectiveness, data security, safety, reliability, and legal issues. With undeniably no way back, in order to benefit most from digital dermatology, we need to acknowledge its limitations and no-go areas and how it shapes the way we practice.

I would like to invite you to contribute papers addressing the aforementioned related aspects for this Special Issue on Prevention and Digital Health in Dermatology.

Dr. Mohamad Goldust
Dr. Paweł Pietkiewicz
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • teledermatology
  • telemedicine
  • AI-assisted diagnosis
  • usability
  • healthcare organization
  • smartphone
  • teleconsultation
  • skin imaging techniques
  • social media

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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18 pages, 1713 KiB  
Article
When Virtual Assistants Meet Teledermatology: Validation of a Virtual Assistant to Improve the Quality of Life of Psoriatic Patients
by Surya Roca, Manuel Almenara, Yolanda Gilaberte, Tamara Gracia-Cazaña, Ana M. Morales Callaghan, Daniel Murciano, José García and Álvaro Alesanco
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(21), 14527; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph192114527 - 5 Nov 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1779
Abstract
Teledermatology has given dermatologists a tool to track patients’ responses to therapy using images. Virtual assistants, the programs that interact with users through text or voice messages, could be used in teledermatology to enhance the interaction of the tool with the patients and [...] Read more.
Teledermatology has given dermatologists a tool to track patients’ responses to therapy using images. Virtual assistants, the programs that interact with users through text or voice messages, could be used in teledermatology to enhance the interaction of the tool with the patients and healthcare professionals and the overall impact of the medication and quality of life of patients. As such, this work aimed to investigate the effectiveness of using a virtual assistant for teledermatology and its impact on the quality of life. We conducted surveys with the participants and measured the usability of the system with the System Usability Scale (SUS). A total of 34 participants (30 patients diagnosed with moderate-severe psoriasis and 4 healthcare professionals) were included in the study. The measurement of the improvement of quality of life was done by analyzing Psoriasis Quality of Life (PSOLIFE) and Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) questionnaires. The results showed that, on average, the quality of life improved (from 63.8 to 64.8 for PSOLIFE (with a p-value of 0.66 and an effect size of 0.06) and 4.4 to 2.8 for DLQI (with a p-value of 0.04 and an effect size of 0.31)). Patients also used the virtual assistant to do 52 medical consultations. Moreover, the usability is above average, with a SUS score of 70.1. As supported by MMAS-8 results, adherence also improved slightly. Our work demonstrates the improvement of the quality of life with the use of a virtual assistant in teledermatology, which could be attributed to the sense of security or peace of mind the patients get as they can contact their dermatologists directly within the virtual assistant-integrated system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention and Digital Health in Dermatology)
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9 pages, 458 KiB  
Article
Cosmetics: What Do Bruneian Female Adults Believe?
by Long Chiau Ming, Nur Hafizah Raudhah Azmi, Hui Poh Goh, Li Ling Chaw, Khang Wen Goh, Nahlah Elkudssiah Ismail, Ganesh Sritheran Paneerselvam and Andi Hermansyah
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(17), 10584; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191710584 - 25 Aug 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3852
Abstract
Objectives: The study aimed to measure the level of attitudes and the current practices of the female community in Brunei Darussalam regarding the usage of cosmetics. Methods: An online survey was conducted using a non-probabilistic snowball sampling approach via the social media channels [...] Read more.
Objectives: The study aimed to measure the level of attitudes and the current practices of the female community in Brunei Darussalam regarding the usage of cosmetics. Methods: An online survey was conducted using a non-probabilistic snowball sampling approach via the social media channels WhatsApp and Instagram. The inclusion criteria were female Bruneian citizens or permanent residents, aged between 18 and 65 years old, who can understand English or Malay, and use cosmetic products at least once a day. Results: A total of 445 participants responded to the online survey. Most of the participants agreed that the use of cosmetic products improves one’s physical appearance to the public (391, 87.8%) and also improves self-confidence (405, 91.1%). There were significant differences in monthly cosmetic product expenses and participants’ attitudes about safe cosmetic use (p = 0.001). No significant changes in the individuals’ attitudes based on their age or educational level were observed. Overall, the participants had a good level of cosmetic safety practice. Almost half of the participants use social media to obtain information regarding what cosmetics to use or purchase. Conclusion: There is a medium to high level of attitude and a high level of practice regarding the safe use of cosmetics among Bruneian female adults. Social media was the main source of information for the respondents, followed by friend circle and family members. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention and Digital Health in Dermatology)
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14 pages, 1366 KiB  
Article
Emergency Use and Efficacy of an Asynchronous Teledermatology System as a Novel Tool for Early Diagnosis of Skin Cancer during the First Wave of COVID-19 Pandemic
by Antal Jobbágy, Norbert Kiss, Fanni Adél Meznerics, Klára Farkas, Dóra Plázár, Szabolcs Bozsányi, Luca Fésűs, Áron Bartha, Endre Szabó, Kende Lőrincz, Miklós Sárdy, Norbert Miklós Wikonkál, Péter Szoldán and András Bánvölgyi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(5), 2699; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19052699 - 25 Feb 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3151
Abstract
Background: After the outbreak of the corona virus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic, teledermatology was implemented in the Hungarian public healthcare system for the first time. Our objective was to assess aggregated diagnostic agreements and to determine the effectiveness of an asynchronous teledermatology system for [...] Read more.
Background: After the outbreak of the corona virus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic, teledermatology was implemented in the Hungarian public healthcare system for the first time. Our objective was to assess aggregated diagnostic agreements and to determine the effectiveness of an asynchronous teledermatology system for skin cancer screening. Methods: This retrospective single-center study included cases submitted for teledermatology consultation during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Follow-up of the patients was performed to collect the results of any subsequent personal examination. Results: 749 patients with 779 lesions were involved. 15 malignant melanomas (9.9%), 78 basal cell carcinomas (51.3%), 21 squamous cell carcinomas (13.8%), 7 other malignancies (4.6%) and 31 actinic keratoses (20.4%) were confirmed. 87 malignancies were diagnosed in the high-urgency group (42.2%), 49 malignancies in the moderate-urgency group (21.6%) and 16 malignancies in the low-urgency group (4.6%) (p < 0.0001). Agreement of malignancies was substantial for primary (86.3%; κ = 0.647) and aggregated diagnoses (85.3%; κ = 0.644). Agreement of total lesions was also substantial for primary (81.2%; κ = 0.769) and aggregated diagnoses (87.9%; κ = 0.754). Conclusions: Our findings showed that asynchronous teledermatology using a mobile phone application served as an accurate skin cancer screening system during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention and Digital Health in Dermatology)
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Review

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14 pages, 337 KiB  
Review
Usefulness of Smartphones in Dermatology: A US-Based Review
by Samantha Ouellette and Babar K. Rao
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3553; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063553 - 17 Mar 2022
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3192
Abstract
(1) Background: As smartphones have become more widely used, they have become an appealing tool for health-related functions. For dermatology alone, hundreds of applications (apps) are available to download for both patients and providers. (2) Methods: The Google Play Store and Apple App [...] Read more.
(1) Background: As smartphones have become more widely used, they have become an appealing tool for health-related functions. For dermatology alone, hundreds of applications (apps) are available to download for both patients and providers. (2) Methods: The Google Play Store and Apple App Store were searched from the United States using dermatology-related terms. Apps were categorized based on description, and the number of reviews, download cost, target audience, and use of AI were recorded. The top apps from each category by number of reviews were reported. Additionally, literature on the benefits and limitations of using smartphones for dermatology were reviewed. (3) Results: A total of 632 apps were included in the study: 395 (62.5%) were marketed towards patients, 203 (32.1%) towards providers, and 34 (5.4%) towards both; 265 (41.9%) were available only on the Google Play Store, 146 (23.1%) only on the Apple App Store, and 221 (35.0%) were available on both; and 595 (94.1%) were free to download and 37 (5.9%) had a cost to download, ranging from USD 0.99 to USD 349.99 (median USD 37.49). A total of 99 apps (15.7%) reported the use of artificial intelligence. (4) Conclusions: Although there are many benefits of using smartphones for dermatology, lack of regulation and high-quality evidence supporting the efficacy and accuracy of apps hinders their potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention and Digital Health in Dermatology)
10 pages, 325 KiB  
Review
Machine Learning and Its Application in Skin Cancer
by Kinnor Das, Clay J. Cockerell, Anant Patil, Paweł Pietkiewicz, Mario Giulini, Stephan Grabbe and Mohamad Goldust
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(24), 13409; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182413409 - 20 Dec 2021
Cited by 64 | Viewed by 8521
Abstract
Artificial intelligence (AI) has wide applications in healthcare, including dermatology. Machine learning (ML) is a subfield of AI involving statistical models and algorithms that can progressively learn from data to predict the characteristics of new samples and perform a desired task. Although it [...] Read more.
Artificial intelligence (AI) has wide applications in healthcare, including dermatology. Machine learning (ML) is a subfield of AI involving statistical models and algorithms that can progressively learn from data to predict the characteristics of new samples and perform a desired task. Although it has a significant role in the detection of skin cancer, dermatology skill lags behind radiology in terms of AI acceptance. With continuous spread, use, and emerging technologies, AI is becoming more widely available even to the general population. AI can be of use for the early detection of skin cancer. For example, the use of deep convolutional neural networks can help to develop a system to evaluate images of the skin to diagnose skin cancer. Early detection is key for the effective treatment and better outcomes of skin cancer. Specialists can accurately diagnose the cancer, however, considering their limited numbers, there is a need to develop automated systems that can diagnose the disease efficiently to save lives and reduce health and financial burdens on the patients. ML can be of significant use in this regard. In this article, we discuss the fundamentals of ML and its potential in assisting the diagnosis of skin cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention and Digital Health in Dermatology)

Other

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10 pages, 1530 KiB  
Case Report
Syphilis, the Great Imitator—Clinical and Dermoscopic Features of a Rare Presentation of Secondary Syphilis
by Carmen Cantisani, Federica Rega, Luca Ambrosio, Teresa Grieco, Norbert Kiss, Fanni Adél Meznerics, András Bánvölgyi, Giordano Vespasiani, Francesca Arienzo, Giovanni Rossi, Giuseppe Soda and Giovanni Pellacani
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(2), 1339; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20021339 - 11 Jan 2023
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 5100
Abstract
Syphilis is characterized by a wide range of variable clinical symptoms; therefore, it is often referred to as “The Great Imitator”. Here, we report the case of a 69-year-old hepatitis-C-positive MSM patient, who was admitted to our clinic due to a solitary firm [...] Read more.
Syphilis is characterized by a wide range of variable clinical symptoms; therefore, it is often referred to as “The Great Imitator”. Here, we report the case of a 69-year-old hepatitis-C-positive MSM patient, who was admitted to our clinic due to a solitary firm painless erythematous maculopapular lesion with a central crater-like crust on the upper right thigh that occurred two months prior. The dermoscopy showed an erythematous, copper-colored, oval lesion with diffuse monomorphic dotted and glomerular vessels, central crust, and circular scaling (Biett’s sign). The histological findings ruled out neoplasia and described a plasma cell infiltrate and endothelial swelling. Finally, the combination of the dermoscopic image, histological findings and the additionally acquired knowledge about the sexual history of the patient at the second visit led to the diagnosis, which was then confirmed with serological tests. Dermoscopy may become a supportive tool to facilitate the recognition of secondary syphilis; however, the reporting of these atypical cases is crucial to highlight the many faces of the disease so that clinicians consider syphilis as part of the differential diagnosis of non-specific lesions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prevention and Digital Health in Dermatology)
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