Special Issue "Offshore Wind Farms"

A special issue of Journal of Marine Science and Engineering (ISSN 2077-1312). This special issue belongs to the section "Ocean Engineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. M. Dolores Esteban

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM). Dept Ingeniería Civil: Hidráulica, Energía y Medio Ambiente. C/ Profesor Aranguren, CP 28040, Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34910674355
Interests: Marine renewable energy; offshore wind; wave energy; maritime engineering; coastal engineering; offshore engineering
Guest Editor
Dr. José-Santos López-Gutiérrez

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM). Dept Ingeniería Civil: Hidráulica, Energía y Medio Ambiente. C/ Profesor Aranguren, CP 28040, Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34910674353
Interests: Marine renewable energy; offshore wind; wave energy; maritime engineering; coastal engineering; offshore engineering
Guest Editor
Dr. Vicente Negro

Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM). Dept Ingeniería Civil: Hidráulica, Energía y Medio Ambiente. C/ Profesor Aranguren, CP 28040, Madrid, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +34910674352
Interests: Marine renewable energy; offshore wind; wave energy; maritime engineering; coastal engineering; offshore engineering

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Offshore wind power is one of the renewable energy sources that is currently considered in the energy mix of some countries, and its use will increase in the future. At the end of 2017, there were a total of 18,814 MW of offshore wind installed worldwide, with the United Kingdom, Germany, China, Denmark and the Netherlands leading the way. The aim of this Special Issue is to put together papers that reflect the current state of the art of the offshore wind industry, covering all the aspects to be taken into account for the planning, design, construction, operation and maintenance and dismantling of the facilities, etc.

This Special Issue invites contributions that deal with all the previously mentioned aspects (but is not limited to them), including the following topics: legislation, environmental, wind resources, foundations and support structures, wind turbine generators, electrical connection, etc.

Dr. M. Dolores Esteban
Dr. José-Santos López-Gutiérrez
Dr. Vicente Negro
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Marine Science and Engineering is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Offshore wind farm
  • Marine energy
  • Foundations
  • Wind resource
  • Wind turbine generators
  • Electrical connection
  • Numerical models
  • Physical models
  • Development, design and construction
  • Operation and maintenance

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Dynamic Response for a Submerged Floating Offshore Wind Turbine with Different Mooring Configurations
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(4), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7040115
Received: 30 January 2019 / Revised: 5 April 2019 / Accepted: 15 April 2019 / Published: 22 April 2019
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Abstract
The paper discusses the effects of mooring configurations on the dynamic response of a submerged floating offshore wind turbine (SFOWT) for intermediate water depths. A coupled dynamic model of a wind turbine-tower-floating platform-mooring system is established, and the dynamic response of the platform, [...] Read more.
The paper discusses the effects of mooring configurations on the dynamic response of a submerged floating offshore wind turbine (SFOWT) for intermediate water depths. A coupled dynamic model of a wind turbine-tower-floating platform-mooring system is established, and the dynamic response of the platform, tensions in mooring lines, and bending moment at the tower base and blade root under four different mooring configurations are checked. A well-stabilized configuration (i.e., four vertical lines and 12 diagonal lines with an inclination angle of 30°) is selected to study the coupled dynamic responses of SFOWT with broken mooring lines, and in order to keep the safety of SFOWT under extreme sea-states, the pretension of the vertical mooring line has to increase from 1800–2780 kN. Results show that the optimized mooring system can provide larger restoring force, and the SFOWT has a smaller movement response under extreme sea-states; when the mooring lines in the upwind wave direction are broken, an increased motion response of the platform will be caused. However, there is no slack in the remaining mooring lines, and the SFOWT still has enough stability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Offshore Wind Farms)
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Open AccessArticle
Loads and Response of a Tension Leg Platform Wind Turbine with Non-Rotating Blades: An Experimental Study
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(3), 56; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7030056
Received: 31 December 2018 / Revised: 20 February 2019 / Accepted: 22 February 2019 / Published: 27 February 2019
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Abstract
This paper describes model testing of a Tension Leg Platform Wind Turbine (TLPWT) with non-rotating blades to better understand its motion and tendon responses when subjected to combined wind and unidirectional regular wave conditions. The TLPWT structure is closely based on the National [...] Read more.
This paper describes model testing of a Tension Leg Platform Wind Turbine (TLPWT) with non-rotating blades to better understand its motion and tendon responses when subjected to combined wind and unidirectional regular wave conditions. The TLPWT structure is closely based on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 5 MW concept. Multiple free decay tests were performed to evaluate the natural periods of the model in the key degrees of freedom, whilst Response Amplitude Operators (RAOs) were derived to show the motion and tendon characteristics. The natural periods in surge and pitch motions evaluated from the decay tests had a relatively close agreement to the theoretical values. Overall, the tested TLPWT model exhibited typical motion responses to that of a generalised TLP with significant surge offsets along with stiff heave and pitch motions. The maximum magnitudes for the RAOs of surge motion and all tendons occurred at the longest wave period of 1.23 s (~13.0 s at full-scale) tested in this study. From the attained results, there was evidence that static wind loading on the turbine structure had some impact on the motions and tendon response, particularly in the heave direction, with an average increase of 13.1% in motion amplitude for the tested wind conditions. The wind had a negligible effect on the surge motion and slightly decreased the tendon tensions in all tendons. The results also showed the set-down magnitudes amounting to approximately 2–5% of the offset. Furthermore, the waves are the dominant factor contributing to the set-down of the TLPWT, with a minimal contribution from the static wind loading. The results of this study could be used for calibrating numerical tools such as CFD codes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Offshore Wind Farms)
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Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Gravity-Based Foundations in the Offshore Wind Sector
J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2019, 7(3), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/jmse7030064
Received: 27 December 2018 / Revised: 20 January 2019 / Accepted: 24 January 2019 / Published: 12 March 2019
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (4492 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
In recent years, the offshore wind industry has seen an important boost that is expected to continue in the coming years. In order for the offshore wind industry to achieve adequate development, it is essential to solve some existing uncertainties, some of which [...] Read more.
In recent years, the offshore wind industry has seen an important boost that is expected to continue in the coming years. In order for the offshore wind industry to achieve adequate development, it is essential to solve some existing uncertainties, some of which relate to foundations. These foundations are important for this type of project. As foundations represent approximately 35% of the total cost of an offshore wind project, it is essential that they receive special attention. There are different types of foundations that are used in the offshore wind industry. The most common types are steel monopiles, gravity-based structures (GBS), tripods, and jackets. However, there are some other types, such as suction caissons, tripiles, etc. For high water depths, the alternative to the previously mentioned foundations is the use of floating supports. Some offshore wind installations currently in operation have GBS-type foundations (also known as GBF: Gravity-based foundation). Although this typology has not been widely used until now, there is research that has highlighted its advantages over other types of foundation for both small and large water depth sites. There are no doubts over the importance of GBS. In fact, the offshore wind industry is trying to introduce improvements so as to turn GBF into a competitive foundation alternative, suitable for the widest ranges of water depth. The present article deals with GBS foundations. The article begins with the current state of the field, including not only the concepts of GBS constructed so far, but also other concepts that are in a less mature state of development. Furthermore, we also present a classification of this type of structure based on the GBS of offshore wind facilities that are currently in operation, as well as some reflections on future GBS alternatives. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Offshore Wind Farms)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

1. Fatigue Analysis of Offshore Wind Turbine Jacket Structures using X-SEA

Pasin Plodpradit, Van Nguyen Dinh  and Ki-Du Kim

Abstract: Offshore wind turbine support structures are commonly subjected to the turbine loading and ocean environmental loads as a cyclic loading which leads to fatigue failure, especially around the structural connections. The occurring stress is typically fluctuation, and it becomes more serious if the stress has large amplitude, as it will bring about an early failure of structural lifespan. The evaluation of fatigue damage requires a sophisticated procedure to determine the damage and service life of an offshore structure for integrity and safety during the operation period. In this study mainly focuses on the innovative estimation of fatigue life for the coupled analysis of jacket offshore wind turbine substructure with fatigue aero dynamics structure and turbulence program (FAST). The deterministic method was deployed for calculating of fatigue damage, which is related with stress concentration factor (SCF) based on offshore standard (API). Moreover, predicting the fatigue life of coupling approach leads to a difference in estimated highest fatigue lifetime decreasing. This result suggests that using coupled method in this study can lead to less conservative designed structures and cost reduction.

J. Mar. Sci. Eng. EISSN 2077-1312 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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