Special Issue "The Prevention, Treatment, and Complications of Diabetes Mellitus"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Endocrinology & Metabolism".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2022.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Manuel Aguilar-Diosdado
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Biomedical Research and Innovation Institute of Cádiz (INiBICA) Research Unit, Puerta del Mar University Hospital, School of Medicine of Cadiz University (UCA), Cádiz, Spain
Interests: diabetes mellitus; thyroid diseases; metabolic syndrome; complications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to participate in this Special Issue of JCM on “Prevention, Treatment, and Complications of Diabetes Mellitus”. As you well know, diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major health problem and, due to complications, is one of the leading causes of blindness, kidney failure, and lower limb amputation. Furthermore, DM notably increases the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and reduces the quality of life.

Although the prevention of type 2 DM based on lifestyle criteria (e.g., nutritional recommendations and physical activity) is well established, no such approaches have yet been demonstrated for type 1 DM, and there are currently no firm proposals for transferring efficient prevention measures to clinical practice.

Regarding treatment, that for type 1 DM continues to be based on insulin therapy with multiple injections or on the implantation of continuous insulin infusion systems, and for both, the application of sensors that continuously determine glucose levels represents a remarkable advance for metabolic control. On the other hand, the treatment of type 2 DM has become more complex, with multiple proposals oriented toward individualization depending on the characteristics of the patient (age, comorbidities, weight, empowerment, and cost).

We look forward to receiving your submissions to this Special Issue.

Prof. Dr. Manuel Aguilar-Diosdado
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Diabetes Mellitus Pathogenesis
  • Diabetes Mellitus Complications
  • Diabetes Mellitus Prevention
  • Diabetes Mellitus Treatment
  • Prevention of Diabetes Complications

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Effects of Weight Gain after 20 Years of Age and Incidence of Hyper-Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterolemia: The Iki Epidemiological Study of Atherosclerosis and Chronic Kidney Disease (ISSA-CKD)
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(14), 3098; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10143098 - 14 Jul 2021
Viewed by 277
Abstract
The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term weight gain from the age of 20 on incidence of hyper-low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterolemia in the general population of Japanese people. Methods: We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using annual health [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long-term weight gain from the age of 20 on incidence of hyper-low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterolemia in the general population of Japanese people. Methods: We conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study using annual health checkup data for residents of Iki City, Nagasaki Prefecture, Japan. A total of 3179 adult (≥30 years old) men and women without hyper-LDL cholesterolemia at baseline, who underwent two or more health checkups were included in the analysis. Information on weight gain (≥10 kg) after 20 years of age was obtained using questionnaire. The outcome of this study was development of hyper-LDL cholesterolemia defined as LDL-cholesterol level ≥3.62 mmol/L and/or initiation of lipid-lowering medications. Results: During a mean follow-up period of 4.53 years, 665 of the 3179 participants developed hyper-LDL cholesterolemia (46.5/1000 person-years). The incidence of hyper-LDL cholesterolemia was higher in participants with a weight gain of ≥10 kg (55.3/1000 person-years) than among those with a weight gain of <10 kg (41.8/1000 person-years). This association remained statistically significant even after adjustment for age, sex, smoking, daily drinking, exercise, obesity, hypertension, and diabetes (multivariable hazard ratio 1.31, 95% confidence interval 1.08–1.58, p = 0.006). Conclusion: A weight gain of ≥10 after 20 years of age affected the development of hyper-LDL cholesterol regardless of age, sex, and obesity in a general population of Japanese. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Prevention, Treatment, and Complications of Diabetes Mellitus)
Article
Eating Speed and Incidence of Diabetes in a Japanese General Population: ISSA-CKD
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(9), 1949; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10091949 - 01 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 381
Abstract
Background: We investigated whether eating speed was associated with the incidence of diabetes in a Japanese general population. Methods: A total of 4853 Japanese individuals without diabetes at baseline were analyzed. Self-reported eating speed was categorized as slow, medium, and fast on the [...] Read more.
Background: We investigated whether eating speed was associated with the incidence of diabetes in a Japanese general population. Methods: A total of 4853 Japanese individuals without diabetes at baseline were analyzed. Self-reported eating speed was categorized as slow, medium, and fast on the basis of questionnaire responses. The study outcome was the incidence of diabetes. Results: After an average follow-up period of 5.1 years, 234 individuals developed diabetes. The incidence of diabetes per 1000 person-years was 4.9 in the slow eating speed group, 8.8 in the medium eating speed group, and 12.5 in the fast eating speed group, respectively (*** p < 0.001 for trend). The HRs were 1.69 (95%CI 0.94–3.06) for the medium eating speed and 2.08 (95%CI 1.13–3.84) for the fast eating speed, compared to the slow eating speed (* p = 0.014 for trend) after adjustment for age, gender, smoking status, drinking, exercise, obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. Conclusion: Faster eating speed increased a risk for the incidence of diabetes in a general Japanese population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Prevention, Treatment, and Complications of Diabetes Mellitus)

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
A Practical Guide for the Management of Steroid Induced Hyperglycaemia in the Hospital
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(10), 2154; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10102154 - 16 May 2021
Viewed by 603
Abstract
Glucocorticoids represent frequently recommended and often indispensable immunosuppressant and anti-inflammatory agents prescribed in various medical conditions. Despite their proven efficacy, glucocorticoids bear a wide variety of side effects among which steroid induced hyperglycaemia (SIHG) is among the most important ones. SIHG, potentially causes [...] Read more.
Glucocorticoids represent frequently recommended and often indispensable immunosuppressant and anti-inflammatory agents prescribed in various medical conditions. Despite their proven efficacy, glucocorticoids bear a wide variety of side effects among which steroid induced hyperglycaemia (SIHG) is among the most important ones. SIHG, potentially causes new-onset hyperglycaemia or exacerbation of glucose control in patients with previously known diabetes. Retrospective data showed that similar to general hyperglycaemia in diabetes, SIHG in the hospital and in outpatient settings detrimentally impacts patient outcomes, including mortality. However, recommendations for treatment targets and guidelines for in-hospital as well as outpatient therapeutic management are lacking, partially due to missing evidence from clinical studies. Still, SIHG caused by various types of glucocorticoids is a common challenge in daily routine and clinical guidance is needed. In this review, we aimed to summarize clinical evidence of SIHG in inpatient care impacting clinical outcome, establishment of diagnosis, diagnostic procedures and therapeutic recommendations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Prevention, Treatment, and Complications of Diabetes Mellitus)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop