Pelvic Floor Disorders: State of the Art and Future Perspectives

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Obstetrics & Gynecology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (25 March 2023) | Viewed by 2206

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of General Gynecology and Gynecologic Oncology, Medical University of Vienna, Währinger Gürtel 18-20, 1090 Vienna, Austria
Interests: pelvic floor surgery; native tissue repair; basic science in urogynecology; incontinence treatment; objective outcome parameters and success definition in PFDs; risk factors for PFDs; urinary microbiota
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Pelvic floor disorders such as pelvic organ prolapse, urinary incontinence or voiding disorders are common and may significantly affect quality of life. In detail, pelvic organ prolapse (POP), for example, represents a major health issue for women worldwide, affecting up to 50% of postmenopausal women. With increasing age, both the incidence and prevalence of POP rise, and this will increase substantially in the future according to studies that have made forecasts in this respect. Treatment options for POP include bedside observation, pessary use and pelvic floor surgery. The latter currently has a lifetime risk of 11.1%. and is equally expected to increase. Furthermore, overactive bladder syndrome as well as stress urinary incontinence are also common diseases. Treatment involves conservative approaches such as weight reduction or improved fluid intake, as well as physical therapy in the form of pelvic floor training or bladder training. Pharmacological medication includes antimuscarinic and beta-adrenergic drugs, as well as estrogen agents. Additionally, incontinence surgery is a further option.

As pelvic floor disorders are common diseases, increasing in likelihood with women's age and affecting the quality of life of the women concerned, it is extremely important to continue to focus research on diagnosis, treatment and innovative future strategies.

Personalized approaches to treatment as well as research in the field of microbiome analysis of the urine over recent decades have led to significant improvements in treatment and preventive strategies in this group of patients. The aim of this Special Issue titled “Pelvic Floor Disorders: State of the Art and Future Perspectives” is to collect and publish original articles as well as reviews demonstrating advances in the diagnostic and therapeutic research field of urogynecology. In summary, better understanding in this field could also help clinicians better guide their patient toward suitable treatment decisions.

Dr. Barbara Bodner-Adler
Guest Editor

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Keywords

  • overactive bladder syndrome
  • urinary incontinence
  • stress urinary incontinence
  • voiding disorders
  • pelvic organ prolapse
  • conservative treatment
  • surgical procedures
  • pathophysiology
  • preventive strategy
  • urinary microbiota

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Editorial

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2 pages, 163 KiB  
Editorial
Special Issue: “Pelvic Floor Disorders: State of the Art and Future Perspectives”
by Barbara Bodner-Adler
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(21), 6473; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11216473 - 31 Oct 2022
Viewed by 984
Abstract
This editorial for the Special Issue “Pelvic Floor Disorders: State of the Art and Future Perspectives” aims to draw attention to the broad field of pelvic floor disorders and serves as an invitation for researchers on a global scaleto share their most recent [...] Read more.
This editorial for the Special Issue “Pelvic Floor Disorders: State of the Art and Future Perspectives” aims to draw attention to the broad field of pelvic floor disorders and serves as an invitation for researchers on a global scaleto share their most recent findings with the urogynecologic community [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pelvic Floor Disorders: State of the Art and Future Perspectives)

Other

Jump to: Editorial

11 pages, 708 KiB  
Systematic Review
Efficacy of Posterior Tibial Nerve Stimulation in the Treatment of Fecal Incontinence: A Systematic Review
by Alfonso Javier Ibáñez-Vera, Rosa María Mondéjar-Ros, Vanessa Franco-Bernal, Guadalupe Molina-Torres and Esther Diaz-Mohedo
J. Clin. Med. 2022, 11(17), 5191; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm11175191 - 1 Sep 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1626
Abstract
Fecal incontinence is a condition that carries high social stigmatization and a determining factor in the quality of life of the person who suffers from it. Its etiology is multifactorial and treatment includes surgical and conservative measures, including stimulation of the posterior tibial [...] Read more.
Fecal incontinence is a condition that carries high social stigmatization and a determining factor in the quality of life of the person who suffers from it. Its etiology is multifactorial and treatment includes surgical and conservative measures, including stimulation of the posterior tibial nerve. The aim of this review is to determine whether posterior tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) is more effective than other treatments in reducing episodes of fecal incontinence in adults. A systematic review of randomized clinical trials that analyzed different approaches and comparisons with other treatments in adults without neurological or metabolic diseases was carried out, analyzing, fundamentally, the reduction of episodes of fecal incontinence. In general, a reduction in fecal incontinence episodes is observed in the experimental groups compared with the control groups, although these differences are not significant in most studies. The results regarding the effectiveness of PTNS in reducing episodes of fecal incontinence compared to other treatments are not entirely conclusive, although benefits are observed regarding the stimulation of sacral roots. More well-designed studies with a long-term follow-up of the results are needed so that the recommendation of this treatment can be generalized. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pelvic Floor Disorders: State of the Art and Future Perspectives)
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