Special Issue "Neurorehabilitation: Progress and Challenges"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Clinical Neurology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Akiyoshi Matsugi
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Rehabilitation, Shijonawate Gakuen University, Japan
Interests: neurophysiology; neuroplasticity; electromyography; brain stimulation; neuromodulation; TMS; nerve stimulation; H-reflex
Prof. Dr. Naoki Yoshida
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Okayama Healthcare Professional University, Okayama, Japan
Interests: rehabilitation engineering; motor control; motion analysis; occupational therapy
Dr. Hideki Nakano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, Kyoto Tachibana University, Kyoto, Japan
Interests: neurorehabilitation; neural plasticity; electroencephalography; neuromodulation; neurofeedback; motor learning; motor control; stroke; aging
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Yohei Okada
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Health Science, Kio University, Nara, Japan
Interests: rehabilitation; physiotherapy; motor control, postural control; gait analysis; movement disorders; Parkinson's disease; neurophysiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Movement disorders caused by neurological diseases, such as stroke, Parkinson's disease, and degenerative spinocerebellar ataxia, can cause significant limitations in daily living. Neurorehabilitation is provided to reduce the burden associated with movement disorders, lessen the limitations in daily living activities, and enhance participation in the social sphere. To achieve progress in neurorehabilitation approaches, it is necessary to investigate the mechanisms of movement disorders, pathological hypotheses, and new intervention studies. For this Special Issue, we welcome research on a wide range of topics, including basic research that contributes to the elucidation of movement disorders, measurement technology to evaluate these disorders, new interventional research using neuromodulation techniques, and clinical research combining regenerative medicine and physiotherapy. We also welcome narrative analyses of single cases, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses regarding neurorehabilitation.

Dr. Akiyoshi Matsugi
Prof. Dr. Naoki Yoshida
Dr. Hideki Nakano
Dr. Yohei Okada
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

• neurorehabilitation
• physiotherapy
• occupational therapy
• movement disorders
• stroke
• ataxia
• gait
• postural control
• neuromodulation
• assistive technology

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Article
Effectiveness of a New 3D-Printed Dynamic Hand–Wrist Splint on Hand Motor Function and Spasticity in Chronic Stroke Patients
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(19), 4549; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10194549 - 30 Sep 2021
Viewed by 267
Abstract
Spasticity, a common stroke complication, can result in impairments and limitations in the performance of activities and participation. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of a new dynamic splint on wrist and finger flexor muscle spasticity in chronic stroke survivors, using a [...] Read more.
Spasticity, a common stroke complication, can result in impairments and limitations in the performance of activities and participation. In this study, we investigated the effectiveness of a new dynamic splint on wrist and finger flexor muscle spasticity in chronic stroke survivors, using a randomized controlled trial. Thirty chronic stroke survivors were recruited and randomly allocated to either an experimental or control group; 25 completed the 6-week intervention program. The participants in the experimental group were asked to wear the dynamic splint at least 6 h/day at home, for the entire intervention. The participants in the control group did not wear any splint. All the participants were evaluated 1 week before, immediately, and after 3 and 6 weeks of splint use, with the modified Ashworth scale and the Fugl−Meyer assessment for upper extremity. User experience was evaluated by a self-reported questionnaire after the 6-week intervention. The timed within-group assessments showed a significant reduction in spasticity and improvements in functional movements in the experimental group. We found differences, in favor of the experimental group, between the groups after the intervention. The splint users indicated a very good satisfaction rating for muscle tone reduction, comfort, and ease of use. Therefore, this new splint can be used for at-home rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients with hemiparesis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurorehabilitation: Progress and Challenges)
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Article
Sensory Nerve Conduction Velocity Predicts Improvement of Hand Function with Nerve Gliding Exercise Following Carpal Tunnel Release Surgery
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(18), 4121; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10184121 - 13 Sep 2021
Viewed by 554
Abstract
This study aims to investigate the effects of nerve gliding exercise following carpal tunnel release surgery (NGE-CTRS) and the probing factors affecting the effect of NGE-CTRS on hand function. A total of 86 patients after CTRS participated. Grip strength (grip-s), pinch strength (pinch-s), [...] Read more.
This study aims to investigate the effects of nerve gliding exercise following carpal tunnel release surgery (NGE-CTRS) and the probing factors affecting the effect of NGE-CTRS on hand function. A total of 86 patients after CTRS participated. Grip strength (grip-s), pinch strength (pinch-s), Semmes-Weinstein monofilament test (SWMT), two-point discrimination (2PD), numbness, pain, and Phalen test (Phalen) were measured and compared between pre- and post-NGE-CTRS. The results showed that the combination of surgery and NGE significantly improved the postoperative grip-s, pinch-s, SWMT, 2PD, numbness, and Phalen; however, no improvement was observed in pain. Background factors that influenced the improved grip-s and pinch-s included gender and preoperative sensory nerve conduction velocity (SCV). Additionally, numbness and Phalen were not affected by age, gender, fault side, bilateral, trigger finger, dialysis, thenar eminence atrophy, motor nerve conduction velocity, SCV, the start of treatment, and occupational therapy intervention. In conclusion, the combination of surgical procedures and NGE showed a high improvement. SCV and time-to-start treatment of intervention for carpal tunnel syndrome may be useful in predicting the function after the intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurorehabilitation: Progress and Challenges)
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Article
Effect of Posterior Pelvic Tilt Taping on Pelvic Inclination, Muscle Strength, and Gait Ability in Stroke Patients: A Randomized Controlled Study
J. Clin. Med. 2021, 10(11), 2381; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10112381 - 28 May 2021
Viewed by 855
Abstract
Objective: Pelvic alignment asymmetry in stroke patients negatively affects postural control ability. This study aimed to investigate the effect of posterior pelvic tilt taping on pelvic inclination, muscle strength, and gait ability in stroke patients. Methods: Forty stroke patients were recruited and randomly [...] Read more.
Objective: Pelvic alignment asymmetry in stroke patients negatively affects postural control ability. This study aimed to investigate the effect of posterior pelvic tilt taping on pelvic inclination, muscle strength, and gait ability in stroke patients. Methods: Forty stroke patients were recruited and randomly divided into the following two groups: the posterior pelvic tilt taping (PPTT) group (n = 20) and the control group (n = 20). All participants underwent sitting-to-standing, indoor walking, and stair walking training (30 min per day, 5 days per week, for 6 weeks). The PPTT group applied posterior pelvic tilt taping during the training period, while the control group did not receive a tape intervention. Pelvic inclination was measured using a palpation meter (PALM). A hand-held dynamometer and the 10-meter walk test were used to measure muscle strength and gait ability. Results: Significantly greater improvements in the pelvic anterior tilt were observed in the PPTT group than in the control group (p < 0.05). Muscle strength in the PPTT group was significantly increased compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Significantly greater improvements in gait speed were observed in the PPTT group than the control group. Conclusions: According to our results, posterior pelvic tilt taping may be used to improve the anterior pelvic inclination, muscle strength, and gait ability in stroke patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurorehabilitation: Progress and Challenges)
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