E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Immunity and Disease"

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 October 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Mehdi Najar

Laboratory of Clinical Cell Therapy, Jules Bordet Institute, Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Campus Erasme, Bâtiment de Transfusion (Level +1), Brussels 1070, Belgium
Website | E-Mail
Interests: mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), tissue sources of MSCs, immunomodulation properties, extracellular vesicles (EVs), environmental challenges, efficient MSC immunotherapy

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Due to their simple and easier isolation procedure as well as their great expansion potential, mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) are increasingly considered as ideal candidates for different therapeutic applications. MSCs are multipotent fibroblast-like cells that can be virtually found in almost all tissues. The therapeutic effect of MSCs is mainly a result of their potent immunomodulatory functions. MSCs are not true immune cells but tissue precursor cells harboring a spectrum of therapeutically active molecules. Moreover, MSCs are environmentally responsive as they can actively sense their surroundings (inflammation, infection, and tissue damage) and modulate in consequence their fate and behavior. By nature, MSCs demonstrate plasticity in their immunomodulatory effects as a way of responding to these challenges. Accordingly, their use as immunotherapeutic strategies will present new hopes for treating patients with immunological and inflammatory diseases. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs and, in particular, the influence of the local environment on their immuno-biology will improve the safety and efficiency of MSC-based therapy as well as help to achieve the appropriate therapeutic effect. Another strategy to enhance the therapeutic value of MSCs is to use their extracellular vesicles (EVs) as an alternative to cellular products. EVs can mediate the immunomodulatory effects of MSCs by transferring their cytokines, mRNA, or miRNA to the target cells. By selectively isolating these MSC-derived vesicles, they can be infused instead of the cells for different immunotherapy purposes.

In this Special Issue, we propose to present updates about the MSC immunomodulatory properties including their extracellular vesicles (EVs) and to discuss different opinions related to MSC source and type, and the effects of environmental signals on their immuno-biology. Your potential contribution based on your expertise in the field would certainly enrich this Special Issue.

Dr. Mehdi Najar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Journal of Clinical Medicine is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) of different origins
  • Immunological and inflammatory diseases
  • MSCs and MSCs-free-based immunotherapeutic strategies
  • Immunomodulatory mechanisms
  • Local environment conditioning
  • Improved MSC strategies

Published Papers (2 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-2
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEditorial
Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Based Therapy: New Perspectives and Challenges
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(5), 626; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8050626
Received: 2 May 2019 / Accepted: 5 May 2019 / Published: 8 May 2019
PDF Full-text (221 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Stem cells have been the focus of intense research opening up new possibilities for the treatment of various diseases. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with relevant immunomodulatory properties and are thus considered as a promising new strategy for immune disease management. [...] Read more.
Stem cells have been the focus of intense research opening up new possibilities for the treatment of various diseases. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with relevant immunomodulatory properties and are thus considered as a promising new strategy for immune disease management. To enhance their efficiency, several issues related to both MSC biology and functions are needed to be identified and, most importantly, well clarified. The sources from which MSCs are isolated are diverse and might affect their properties. Both clinicians and scientists need to handle a phenotypic-characterized population of MSCs, particularly regarding their immunological profile. Moreover, it is now recognized that the tissue-reparative effects of MSCs are based on their immunomodulatory functions that are activated following a priming/licensing step. Thus, finding the best ways to pre-conditionate MSCs before their injection will strengthen their activity potential. Finally, soluble elements derived from MSC-secretome, including extracellular vesicles (EVs), have been proposed as a cell-free alternative tool for therapeutic medicine. Collectively, these features have to be considered and developed to ensure the efficiency and safety of MSC-based therapy. By participating to this Special Issue “Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Immunity and Disease”, your valuable contribution will certainly enrich the content and discussion related to the thematic of MSCs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Immunity and Disease)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle
T-Regulatory Cells Confer Increased Myelination and Stem Cell Activity after Stroke-Induced White Matter Injury
J. Clin. Med. 2019, 8(4), 537; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm8040537
Received: 13 March 2019 / Revised: 5 April 2019 / Accepted: 17 April 2019 / Published: 19 April 2019
PDF Full-text (2326 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Stroke-induced hypoxia causes oligodendrocyte death due to inflammation, lack of oxygen and exacerbation of cell death. Bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) possess an endogenous population of T-regulatory cells (Tregs) which reduce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines that lead to secondary cell death. [...] Read more.
Stroke-induced hypoxia causes oligodendrocyte death due to inflammation, lack of oxygen and exacerbation of cell death. Bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) possess an endogenous population of T-regulatory cells (Tregs) which reduce secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines that lead to secondary cell death. Here, we hypothesize that oligodendrocyte progenitor cells (OPCs) cultured with BMSCs containing their native Treg population show greater cell viability, less pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and greater myelin production after exposure to oxygen-glucose deprivation and reoxygenation (OGD/R) than OPCs cultured without Tregs. OPCs were cultured and then exposed to OGD/R. BMSCs with or without Tregs were added to the co-culture immediately after ischemia. The Tregs were depleted by running the BMSCs through a column containing a magnetic substrate. Fibroblast growth factor beta (FGF-β) and interleukin 6 (IL-6) ELISAs determined BMSC activity levels. Immunohistochemistry assessed OPC differentiation. OPCs cultured with BMSCs containing their endogenous Tregs showed increased myelin production compared to the BMSCs with depleted Tregs. IL-6 and FGF-β were increased in the group cultured with Tregs. Collectively, these results suggest that BMSCs containing Tregs are more therapeutically active, and that Tregs have beneficial effects on OPCs subjected to ischemia. Tregs play an important role in stem cell therapy and can potentially treat white matter injury post-stroke. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mesenchymal Stem/Stromal Cells in Immunity and Disease)
Figures

Figure 1

J. Clin. Med. EISSN 2077-0383 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top