Cognitive Decline and Dementia: Physical, Cognitive and Mental Health in Older Adults

A special issue of Journal of Clinical Medicine (ISSN 2077-0383). This special issue belongs to the section "Epidemiology & Public Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 May 2024 | Viewed by 2106

Special Issue Editors


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Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Science, University of Jaen, 23071 Jaen, Spain
Interests: menopause; older adults; sarcopenia; fall prevention; exercise; active aging
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E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Science, University of Jaen, 23071 Jaen, Spain
Interests: physical therapy; older adults; sarcopenia; body composition; physical exercise; health promotion; quality of life
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are pleased to announce that the next Special Issue of the Journal of Clinical Medicine will be entitled "Cognitive Decline and Dementia: Physical, Cognitive and Mental Health in Older Adults".

The ageing population is increasing due to longer life expectancy and lower birth rates, leading to a higher proportion of older people in the world's population. Several functional changes are related to the aging process, cognition being one of the main impacted aspects of this stage. Cognitive impairment is considered a public health problem due to its high prevalence, the socioeconomic burden it causes and the impact it has on patient quality of life. It has been estimated that the annual rate of transition from normal cognition to cognitive impairment is 5%, although this figure could be as high as 30% when it is considered that an individual with normal cognition may have some type of unidentifiable cognitive impairment. Likewise, cognitive impairment is characterized as a risk factor for the development of dementias that are just as disabling worldwide owing to the association of cognitive function at lower levels with reduced functional capacity, alterations in mood or behavior, and impaired cognitive functions. Hence, it is necessary to study the different associations related to these diseases and to test different strategies that improve the physical, mental and cognitive health of people with cognitive impairment or dementia.

This Special Issue of the Journal of Clinical Medicine (JCM) will address the current state of the knowledge on the links between cognitive impairment and dementia with the physical, mental and cognitive health of older adults. We are eager to publish original research papers and reviews. Researchers are also encouraged to submit manuscripts studying new approaches to or strategies for the management of cognitive impairment and dementia.

Prof. Dr. Fidel Hita-Contreras
Prof. Dr. Agustín Aibar Almazán
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • cognitive decline
  • dementia
  • physical health
  • cognitive health
  • mental health
  • older adults

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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13 pages, 846 KiB  
Article
Public Knowledge about Dementia in Poland—A Survey Study
by Alicja Skowronek, Katarzyna Bojkowska-Otrębska and Beata Łabuz-Roszak
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(24), 7675; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12247675 - 14 Dec 2023
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Abstract
Background: Based on worldwide estimates, the number of people with dementia will increase significantly in the coming decades. Therefore, knowledge about dementia and its modifiable risk factors plays a crucial role in prevention. Although dementia is still incurable, an early diagnosis might help [...] Read more.
Background: Based on worldwide estimates, the number of people with dementia will increase significantly in the coming decades. Therefore, knowledge about dementia and its modifiable risk factors plays a crucial role in prevention. Although dementia is still incurable, an early diagnosis might help to slow down its progression and improve the quality of patients’ lives. The aim of the study was to assess public knowledge about dementia and its risk factors in Poland. Methods: The research was conducted in 2022 using a self-constructed questionnaire by applying computer-assisted web interviewing (CAWI). Results: A total of 304 completed surveys were obtained (mean score of 16.95 ± 2.79 points out of 23.6). The scores were significantly higher for people associated with the medical community in comparison to those unrelated to the medical community (18.23 ± 2.61 and 16.15 ± 2.59, respectively; p = 0.0001). A moderate negative correlation was found between the results and the ages of the respondents (R = −0.44; p = 0.001). No statistically significant differences were reported in the results between people involved in providing care to patients with dementia or those who had a patient with dementia in the family and those who were not involved in such care or had no relative with dementia. Conclusions: Knowledge about dementia and its risk factors in Poland is not satisfactory and should be improved. Special attention should be paid to educating the families and caregivers of people with dementia. Full article
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Review

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15 pages, 1123 KiB  
Review
The Impact of Rhythmic Physical Activity on Mental Health and Quality of Life in Older Adults with and without Cognitive Impairment: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Marcelina Sánchez-Alcalá, Agustín Aibar-Almazán, Diego Fernando Afanador-Restrepo, María del Carmen Carcelén-Fraile, Alexander Achalandabaso-Ochoa, Yolanda Castellote-Caballero and Fidel Hita-Contreras
J. Clin. Med. 2023, 12(22), 7084; https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm12227084 - 14 Nov 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1087
Abstract
(1) Background: Nowadays, it is essential to implement new non-pharmacological strategies, such as rhythmic physical activity, to improve mental health and quality of life in both individuals experiencing normal brain aging and those with cognitive impairment. Therefore, the objective of this study is [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Nowadays, it is essential to implement new non-pharmacological strategies, such as rhythmic physical activity, to improve mental health and quality of life in both individuals experiencing normal brain aging and those with cognitive impairment. Therefore, the objective of this study is to identify the effects of rhythmic physical activity interventions on mental health and quality of life in older adults, with or without mild cognitive impairment; (2) Methods: We conducted a systematic review with a meta-analysis, searching the Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Cochrane Plus databases using specific keywords. We selected studies that included rhythmic physical activity as the primary intervention for patients aged 65 and above, with or without cognitive impairment. We assessed the methodological quality of the articles using the PEDro scale; (3) Results: Out of 961 identified studies, we included 11 in this review, all of which employed rhythmic physical activity as an intervention. The selected studies consistently measured depression, anxiety, and quality of life; (4) Conclusions: This review demonstrates that rhythmic physical activity can effectively improve depression, anxiety, and quality of life in older adults, whether or not they have mild cognitive impairment. However, it is worth noting that while we have identified beneficial outcomes, the evidence supporting the use of rhythmic physical activity in enhancing depression, anxiety, and quality of life in older adults with or without mild cognitive impairment remains somewhat limited. Full article
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