Special Issue "Planning Peripheral and Ultra-Peripheral Infrastructures"

A special issue of Infrastructures (ISSN 2412-3811).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 December 2022 | Viewed by 4336

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Rui Alexandre Castanho
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Faculty of Applied Sciences, WSB University, 41-300 Dąbrowa Górnicza, Poland
2. Faculty of Social Sciences and Humanities, Universidad International de la Rioja, Av. de la Paz, 137, 26006 Logroño, La Rioja, Spain
Interests: cross-border cooperation; common planning; eco-tourism; fund management; sustainable planning; sustainable development; territorial governance and management; tourism sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ana Vulevic
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Urban Planning and Architecture, Institute of Transportation—CIP, Belgrade, Serbia
Interests: geographic information systems (GIS); accessibility; connectivity; infrastructures planning; planning strategies; sustainable development
Prof. Dr. Gualter Couto
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Business and Economics and CEEAplA, Universidade dos Açores, Ponta Delgada, Portugal
Interests: finance; real options; eco-tourism; rural-tourism; creative-tourism; tourism sustainability
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. José Manuel Naranjo Gómez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Graphic Expression Department, School of Agricultural Engineering, University of Extremadura, 06007 Badajoz, Spain
Interests: geographic information systems (GIS); accessibility; connectivity; regional studies; infrastructures planning; sustainable planning
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is a fact that the peripheral and ultra-peripheral regions as Borderlands or Islands present several territorial specificities. Nevertheless, these territories also present several obstacles, barriers, and opportunities. Among all those issues, appropriate infrastructure planning is necessary to answer the local populations' needs. Therefore, studies regarding transportation and infrastructure planning and sustainability assessment in those territories are fundamental to achieving sustained growth.

Contextually, the present Special Issue (SI) expects to cross and analyze the dynamics and challenges ongoing in those peripheral territories regarding transportation and infrastructure planning and sustainability and with the related issues that may impact it.

Consequently, the editors encourage the submission of studies associated with the topics of transportation and infrastructure planning in peripheral and ultra-peripheral regions, as well as with the associated governance strategies and methods, regional planning, among several other sub-topics that could relate to the main scope of this Special Issue and, consequently, produce a literature enhancement about this particular typology of territories.

Prof. Dr. Rui Alexandre Castanho
Prof. Dr. Ana Vulevic
Prof. Dr. Gualter Couto
Prof. Dr. José Manuel Naranjo Gómez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Infrastructures is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • accessibility
  • connectivity
  • infrastructures planning
  • planning strategies
  • geographic information systems (GIS)
  • insular and peripheral regions
  • low-density territories
  • sustainable development
  • sustainable development
  • sustainability

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Article
Multi-Criteria Methodology for the Location of Photovoltaic Solar Energy Production Facilities in Tenerife (Spain)
Infrastructures 2022, 7(3), 28; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures7030028 - 23 Feb 2022
Viewed by 760
Abstract
This paper presents a multi-criteria methodology for the detection of optimal locations for solar photovoltaic installations connected to the electrical grid. The proposed methodology has been applied to the island of Tenerife, as it is one of the territories in Spain with the [...] Read more.
This paper presents a multi-criteria methodology for the detection of optimal locations for solar photovoltaic installations connected to the electrical grid. The proposed methodology has been applied to the island of Tenerife, as it is one of the territories in Spain with the greatest solar potential. This methodology integrates an Aptitude Model (which covers variables such as connections to the electrical grid, accessibility, cloudiness, solar irradiation and slope) together with an Impact Model (which considers variables such as landscape vulnerability, land use and hydrology). Each one of the variables considered has been transformed into standardized decision criteria, which have been weighted by means of Saaty’s pair method, having also assigned them relative weights by means of expert consultation. The integration of both Models in a Hosting Capacity Model makes it possible to consider urban and environmental constraints in different possible scenarios. Finally, the Hosting Capacity Model generated is implemented through a Geographic Information System (GIS) on the island of Tenerife, so that it has been possible to detect the optimum locations for each municipality and region. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Planning Peripheral and Ultra-Peripheral Infrastructures)
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Article
Maritime Transportation Dynamics in the Azores Region: Analyzing the Period 1998–2019
Infrastructures 2022, 7(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures7020021 - 30 Jan 2022
Viewed by 1027
Abstract
The geography over which maritime transportation operates is unique, combining physical, strategic, and commercial imperatives. Physical issues are stable across time, but strategic, especially commercial, considerations continually shift with the ebb and flow of the globalization process. Contextually, the distance that isolates different [...] Read more.
The geography over which maritime transportation operates is unique, combining physical, strategic, and commercial imperatives. Physical issues are stable across time, but strategic, especially commercial, considerations continually shift with the ebb and flow of the globalization process. Contextually, the distance that isolates different locations in many cases plays a vital function in these interactions. Distance is the primary element that affects the values of interaction intensities. In fact, the issue is how the intensities were reduced with distance since this reduction is generally not linear. In this regard, this article intends to pursue the issues of the shape and parameters of the distance–decay functions based on the travel time value between islands. In this regard, almost all the Azores Islands were used as a case study. The study results show that the distance–decay functions established the unique dominance of Faial Island, Pico Island, and São Jorge Island, all in the Azores central group; in addition, there was an increase in the number of passengers in those. Moreover, the dominant position is the central islands, and their coexistence with others in the environment makes them more accessible than other islands, showing Terceira Island as a potential maritime passengers’ hub in the Azores. So, with this study, it becomes clear which are the main accessibility issues within the Azores archipelago as well as efficiency should be promoted through the design of policies in maritime passengers’ transportation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Planning Peripheral and Ultra-Peripheral Infrastructures)
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Article
Accessibility in European Peripheral Territories: Analyzing the Portuguese Mainland Connectivity Patterns from 1985 to 2020
Infrastructures 2021, 6(6), 92; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6060092 - 20 Jun 2021
Viewed by 786
Abstract
The inner periphery European countries, as is the case of Portugal, are characterized by poor access to essential areas and services of general and social relations. Contextually, this paper aims to explore the linkages between inner peripheries, ultra-peripherality concepts, and the concept of [...] Read more.
The inner periphery European countries, as is the case of Portugal, are characterized by poor access to essential areas and services of general and social relations. Contextually, this paper aims to explore the linkages between inner peripheries, ultra-peripherality concepts, and the concept of accessibility from 1985 to 2020, in parallel with the analysis of some demographic trends in the same research period. Thus, the study deals with accessibility and the analysis of accessibility-related spatial distribution to represent the traditional core—periphery pattern, with the highest accessibility in the center of the mainland and west coastal area, and the lowest accessibility in remote regions. The results show that the distribution of the road infrastructure is not uniform in Portugal. Furthermore, the NUTS II regions of PT13 Lisboa e Vale do Tejo (the Lisbon region) and PT11 Norte (northern Portugal) have the greatest road per km2. The Lisbon region has the highest concentration of national roads globally, while the northern region has the highest concentration of municipal roads. These two regions are, by far, the most densely populated, encompassing about ¾ of the national population and GDP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Planning Peripheral and Ultra-Peripheral Infrastructures)
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Article
Understanding Traffic Congestion via Network Analysis, Agent Modeling, and the Trajectory of Urban Expansion: A Coastal City Case
Infrastructures 2021, 6(6), 85; https://doi.org/10.3390/infrastructures6060085 - 06 Jun 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1090
Abstract
The study of patterns of urban mobility is of utter importance for city growth projection and development planning. In this paper, we analyze the topological aspects of the street network of the coastal city of Cartagena de Indias employing graph theory and spatial [...] Read more.
The study of patterns of urban mobility is of utter importance for city growth projection and development planning. In this paper, we analyze the topological aspects of the street network of the coastal city of Cartagena de Indias employing graph theory and spatial syntax tools. We find that the resulting network can be understood on the basis of 400 years of the city’s history and its peripheral location that strongly influenced and shaped the growth of the city, and that the statistical properties of the network resemble those of self-organized cities. Moreover, we study the mobility through the network using a simple agent-based model that allows us to study the level of street congestion depending on the agents’ knowledge of the traffic while they travel through the network. We found that a purely shortest-path travel scheme is not an optimal strategy and that assigning small weights to traffic avoidance schemes increases the overall performance of the agents in terms of arrival success, occupancy of the streets, and traffic accumulation. Finally, we argue that localized congestion can be only partially ascribed to topological properties of the network and that it is important to consider the decision-making capability of the agents while moving through the network to explain the emergence of traffic congestion in the system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Planning Peripheral and Ultra-Peripheral Infrastructures)
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