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Special Issue "Mapping Abiotic Stress-Tolerance Genes in Plants"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Plant Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Richard R.-C. Wang

Forage and Range Research Lab, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322-6300, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: molecular markers; salinity tolerance; disease resistance; DNA sequencing; genome; chromosome; evolution; genetics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tolerance to abiotic stresses caused by environmental conditions can prevent yield loss in crops for sustaining agricultural productivity. For each crop or plant species, there are many abiotic threats such as changes in temperature, soil salinity, water shortage, and soil contaminants. Plants need to posses genes conferring tolerance to these abiotic stresses to adapt to the changing environment in which they are being grown. Foreseeing climate changes, plant breeders are undertaking efforts to identify and transfer genes for tolerance to high/low temperature, soil salinity/alkalinity, drought, or heavy metals, into new cultivars. Plant molecular geneticists have identified many physiological pathways and mechanisms involved in tolerance to various abiotic stresses in some plant species. Many metabolites, enzymes, and transcription factors associated with tolerance to these abiotic stresses have been identified. With the advent of whole-genome sequencing in many important crops, it is time to map the detailed chromosomal locations of known genes that are involved in conferring  tolerance to various abiotic stresses in each crop.

Dr. Richard R.-C. Wang
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Tolerance
  • Heat
  • Cold
  • Drought
  • Salinity
  • Whole-genome sequencing
  • Linkage map

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Phylogenetic, Molecular, and Functional Characterization of PpyCBF Proteins in Asian Pears (Pyrus pyrifolia)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(9), 2074; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20092074
Received: 24 March 2019 / Revised: 23 April 2019 / Accepted: 24 April 2019 / Published: 26 April 2019
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Abstract
C-repeat binding factor/dehydration-responsive element (CBF/DRE) transcription factors (TFs) participate in a variety of adaptive mechanisms, and are involved in molecular signaling and abiotic stress tolerance in plants. In pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) and other rosaceous crops, the independent evolution of CBF subfamily [...] Read more.
C-repeat binding factor/dehydration-responsive element (CBF/DRE) transcription factors (TFs) participate in a variety of adaptive mechanisms, and are involved in molecular signaling and abiotic stress tolerance in plants. In pear (Pyrus pyrifolia) and other rosaceous crops, the independent evolution of CBF subfamily members requires investigation to understand the possible divergent functions of these proteins. In this study, phylogenetic analysis divided six PpyCBFs from the Asian pear genome into three clades/subtypes, and collinearity and phylogenetic analyses suggested that PpyCBF3 was the mother CBF. All PpyCBFs were found to be highly expressed in response to low temperature, salt, drought, and abscisic acid (ABA) as well as bud endodormancy, similar to PpyCORs (PpyCOR47, PpyCOR15A, PpyRD29A, and PpyKIN). Transcript levels of clade II PpyCBFs during low temperature and ABA treatments were higher than those of clades I and III. Ectopic expression of PpyCBF2 and PpyCBF3 in Arabidopsis enhanced its tolerance against abiotic stresses, especially to low temperature in the first case and salt and drought stresses in the latter, and resulted in lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant gene activities compared with the wild type. The increased expression of endogenous ABA-dependent and -independent genes during normal conditions in PpyCBF2- and PpyCBF3-overexpressing Arabidopsis lines suggested that PpyCBFs were involved in both ABA-dependent and -independent pathways. All PpyCBFs, especially the mother CBF, had high transactivation activities with 6XCCGAC binding elements. Luciferase and Y1H assays revealed the existence of phylogenetically and promoter-dependent conserved CBF–COR cascades in the pear. The presence of a previously identified CCGA binding site, combined with the results of mutagenesis of the CGACA binding site of the PpyCOR15A promoter, indicated that CGA was a core binding element of PpyCBFs. In conclusion, PpyCBF TFs might operate redundantly via both ABA-dependent and -independent pathways, and are strongly linked to abiotic stress signaling and responses in the Asian pear. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mapping Abiotic Stress-Tolerance Genes in Plants)
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Open AccessArticle
Deep Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Network Evolution, Response to Abiotic Stress, and Regulation of Fiber Development in Cotton
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(8), 1863; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20081863
Received: 28 February 2019 / Revised: 8 April 2019 / Accepted: 8 April 2019 / Published: 15 April 2019
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Abstract
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important molecules in the plant, which are involved in many biological processes, including fiber development and adaptation to abiotic stress in cotton. We carried out transcription analysis to determine the evolution of the ROS genes and analyzed their [...] Read more.
Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important molecules in the plant, which are involved in many biological processes, including fiber development and adaptation to abiotic stress in cotton. We carried out transcription analysis to determine the evolution of the ROS genes and analyzed their expression levels in various tissues of cotton plant under abiotic stress conditions. There were 515, 260, and 261 genes of ROS network that were identified in Gossypium hirsutum (AD1 genome), G. arboreum (A genome), and G. raimondii (D genome), respectively. The ROS network genes were found to be distributed in all the cotton chromosomes, but with a tendency of aggregating on either the lower or upper arms of the chromosomes. Moreover, all the cotton ROS network genes were grouped into 17 families as per the phylogenetic tress analysis. A total of 243 gene pairs were orthologous in G. arboreum and G. raimondii. There were 240 gene pairs that were orthologous in G. arboreum, G. raimondii, and G. hirsutum. The synonymous substitution value (Ks) peaks of orthologous gene pairs between the At subgenome and the A progenitor genome (G. arboreum), D subgenome and D progenitor genome (G. raimondii) were 0.004 and 0.015, respectively. The Ks peaks of ROS network orthologous gene pairs between the two progenitor genomes (A and D genomes) and two subgenomes (At and Dt subgenome) were 0.045. The majority of Ka/Ks value of orthologous gene pairs between the A, D genomes and two subgenomes of TM-1 were lower than 1.0. RNA seq. analysis and RT-qPCR validation, showed that, CSD1,2,3,5,6; FSD1,2; MSD1,2; APX3,11; FRO5.6; and RBOH6 played a major role in fiber development while CSD1, APX1, APX2, MDAR1, GPX4-6-7, FER2, RBOH6, RBOH11, and FRO5 were integral for enhancing salt stress in cotton. ROS network-mediated signal pathway enhances the mechanism of fiber development and regulation of abiotic stress in Gossypium. This study will enhance the understanding of ROS network and form the basic foundation in exploring the mechanism of ROS network-involving the fiber development and regulation of abiotic stress in cotton. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mapping Abiotic Stress-Tolerance Genes in Plants)
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Open AccessArticle
HvPAA1 Encodes a P-Type ATPase, a Novel Gene for Cadmium Accumulation and Tolerance in Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(7), 1732; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20071732
Received: 1 March 2019 / Revised: 1 April 2019 / Accepted: 2 April 2019 / Published: 8 April 2019
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Abstract
The identification of gene(s) that are involved in Cd accumulation/tolerance is vital in developing crop cultivars with low Cd accumulation. We developed a doubled haploid (DH) population that was derived from a cross of Suyinmai 2 (Cd-sensitive) × Weisuobuzhi (Cd-tolerant) to conduct quantitative [...] Read more.
The identification of gene(s) that are involved in Cd accumulation/tolerance is vital in developing crop cultivars with low Cd accumulation. We developed a doubled haploid (DH) population that was derived from a cross of Suyinmai 2 (Cd-sensitive) × Weisuobuzhi (Cd-tolerant) to conduct quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping studies. We assessed chlorophyll content, traits that are associated with development, metal concentration, and antioxidative enzyme activity in DH population lines and parents under control and Cd stress conditions. A single QTL, designated as qShCd7H, was identified on chromosome 7H that was linked to shoot Cd concentration; qShCd7H explained 17% of the phenotypic variation. Comparative genomics, map-based cloning, and gene silencing were used in isolation, cloning, and functional characterization of the candidate gene. A novel gene HvPAA1, being related to shoot Cd concentration, was identified from qShCd7H. Sequence comparison indicated that HvPAA1 carried seven domains with an N-glycosylation motif. HvPAA1 is predominantly expressed in shoots. Subcellular localization verified that HvPAA1 is located in plasma membrane. The silencing of HvPAA1 resulted in growth inhibition, greater Cd accumulation, and a significant decrease in Cd tolerance. We conclude HvPAA1 is a novel plasma membrane-localized ATPase that contributes to Cd tolerance and accumulation in barley. The results provide us with new insights that may aid in the screening and development of Cd-tolerant and low-Cd-accumulation crops. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mapping Abiotic Stress-Tolerance Genes in Plants)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Adaptive Mechanism of Plants to Iron Deficiency via Iron Uptake, Transport, and Homeostasis
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2019, 20(10), 2424; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms20102424
Received: 16 April 2019 / Revised: 11 May 2019 / Accepted: 14 May 2019 / Published: 16 May 2019
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Abstract
Iron is an essential element for plant growth and development. While abundant in soil, the available Fe in soil is limited. In this regard, plants have evolved a series of mechanisms for efficient iron uptake, allowing plants to better adapt to iron deficient [...] Read more.
Iron is an essential element for plant growth and development. While abundant in soil, the available Fe in soil is limited. In this regard, plants have evolved a series of mechanisms for efficient iron uptake, allowing plants to better adapt to iron deficient conditions. These mechanisms include iron acquisition from soil, iron transport from roots to shoots, and iron storage in cells. The mobilization of Fe in plants often occurs via chelating with phytosiderophores, citrate, nicotianamine, mugineic acid, or in the form of free iron ions. Recent work further elucidates that these genes’ response to iron deficiency are tightly controlled at transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels to maintain iron homeostasis. Moreover, increasing evidences shed light on certain factors that are identified to be interconnected and integrated to adjust iron deficiency. In this review, we highlight the molecular and physiological bases of iron acquisition from soil to plants and transport mechanisms for tolerating iron deficiency in dicotyledonous plants and rice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mapping Abiotic Stress-Tolerance Genes in Plants)
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Int. J. Mol. Sci. EISSN 1422-0067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
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