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Special Issue "Microgravity and Space Medicine"

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Daniela Grimm
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Biomedicine, Aarhus University, Health, Høegh-Guldbergsgade 10, bygn. 1116 (SKOU), 8000 Aarhus C, Denmark
Interests: cancer; cell biology; gravitational biology; space medicine; tissue engineering; pharmacology; apoptosis; SOX transcription factors
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the near future, humans will return to the Moon and start expeditions to Mars and to other planets. In addition, there will be an increase in space tourism, which will lead to a high number of manned spaceflights. A long-term stay in space can influence the health of space travelers and can result in various health problems.

This Special Issue focuses on the impact of altered gravity conditions on mammalian cells, animals, and humans during spaceflights. It addresses the impact of cosmic radiation, available countermeasures, and possible applications on Earth.

The Special Issue will also publish studies investigating the impact of real and simulated microgravity on human and animal cells as well as on microorganisms. A special focus lies on projects in the field of cancer research and tissue engineering. Ground-based facilities available to simulate microgravity on Earth can be used for studying changes in various cell types.

Articles and reviews will be published which examine either the molecular biological background of external signals in cancer and other diseases or cellular mechanisms responsible for the manifold changes occurring in cells and animals when exposed to microgravity. In addition, manuscripts reporting on experiments utilizing microgravity for tissue engineering purposes and also on bioprinting of tissues used in microgravity applications will be accepted for publication.

Prof. Dr. Daniela Grimm
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Molecular Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. There is an Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal. For details about the APC please see here. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Space flight
  • Rocket flight
  • Parabolic flight mission
  • Cancer research
  • Animals
  • Cells
  • Humans
  • Tissue engineering
  • Immune system
  • Microgravity-related health problems
  • Cosmic radiation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Antioxidant Strategy to Prevent Simulated Microgravity-Induced Effects on Bone Osteoblasts
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(10), 3638; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21103638 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
The effects induced by microgravity on human body functions have been widely described, in particular those on skeletal muscle and bone tissues. This study aims to implement information on the possible countermeasures necessary to neutralize the oxidative imbalance induced by microgravity on osteoblastic [...] Read more.
The effects induced by microgravity on human body functions have been widely described, in particular those on skeletal muscle and bone tissues. This study aims to implement information on the possible countermeasures necessary to neutralize the oxidative imbalance induced by microgravity on osteoblastic cells. Using the model of murine MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells, cellular morphology, proliferation, and metabolism were investigated during exposure to simulated microgravity on a random positioning machine in the absence or presence of an antioxidant—the 6-hydroxy-2,5,7,8-tetramethylchroman-2-carboxylic acid (Trolox). Our results confirm that simulated microgravity-induced morphological and metabolic alterations characterized by increased levels of reactive oxygen species and a slowdown of the proliferative rate. Interestingly, the use of Trolox inhibited the simulated microgravity-induced effects. Indeed, the antioxidant-neutralizing oxidants preserved cell cytoskeletal architecture and restored cell proliferation rate and metabolism. The use of appropriate antioxidant countermeasures could prevent the modifications and damage induced by microgravity on osteoblastic cells and consequently on bone homeostasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microgravity and Space Medicine)
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Open AccessArticle
Dynamic Changes of Heart Failure Biomarkers in Response to Parabolic Flight
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2020, 21(10), 3467; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21103467 - 14 May 2020
Abstract
Background: we aimed at investigating the influence of weightlessness and hypergravity by means of parabolic flight on the levels of the heart failure biomarkers H-FABP, sST2, IL-33, GDF-15, suPAR and Fetuin-A. Methods: 14 healthy volunteers (males: eight; mean age: 28.9) undergoing 31 short-term [...] Read more.
Background: we aimed at investigating the influence of weightlessness and hypergravity by means of parabolic flight on the levels of the heart failure biomarkers H-FABP, sST2, IL-33, GDF-15, suPAR and Fetuin-A. Methods: 14 healthy volunteers (males: eight; mean age: 28.9) undergoing 31 short-term phases of weightlessness and hypergravity were included. At different time points (baseline, 1 h/24 h after parabolic flight), venous blood was drawn and analyzed by the use of ELISA. Results: sST2 evidenced a significant decrease 24 h after parabolic flight (baseline vs. 24, p = 0.009; 1 h vs. 24 h, p = 0.004). A similar finding was observed for GDF-15 (baseline vs. 24 h, p = 0.002; 1 h vs. 24 h, p = 0.025). The suPAR showed a significant decrease 24 h after parabolic flight (baseline vs. 24 h, p = 0.1726; 1 h vs. 24 h, p = 0.009). Fetuin-A showed a significant increase at 1 h and 24 h after parabolic flight (baseline vs. 24 h, p = 0.007; 1 h vs. 24 h, p = 0.04). H-FABP and IL-33 showed no significant differences at all time points. Conclusion: Our results suggest a reduction in cardiac stress induced by exposure to gravitational changes. Moreover, our findings indicate an influence of gravitational changes on proliferative processes and calcium homeostasis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microgravity and Space Medicine)
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