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The Crosstalk between Adipose Tissue and Cancer

A special issue of International Journal of Molecular Sciences (ISSN 1422-0067). This special issue belongs to the section "Molecular Pathology, Diagnostics, and Therapeutics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2023) | Viewed by 6985

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Research Centre for Optimal Health, Department of Life Sciences, University of Westminster, London W1W 6UW, UK
Interests: obesity; ageing; metabolic dysfunction

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues, 

Cancer is a heterogeneous disease that promotes cell growth, disables cell death mechanisms, and evades immune surveillance and therapy. Obesity is linked to the increased risk and aggressiveness of cancer. Metabolic and inflammatory changes in adipose tissue contribute to chronic inflammation and are associated with cancer. However, the mechanisms underlying the adipose tissue–cancer relationship, such as the process of evolution of the adipose tissue microenvironment during obesity and the influence of these changes on tumour initiation and progression, are poorly understood.

In this Special Issue of IJMS, our objective is to explore the current, state-of-the-art knowledge surrounding the mechanisms that underpin the cross talk between adipose tissue and tumour cells, which promote tumour growth and increase cellular lipid metabolism, metastasis, and chemoresistance. Researchers are welcomed and invited to submit original research papers and reviews.

Dr. Pinar Uysal Onganer
Prof. Dr. Jimmy D. Bell
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • obesity
  • inflammation
  • tumour microenvironment
  • adipose tissue
  • metastasis

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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19 pages, 5188 KiB  
Article
Treatment Resulting Changes in Volumes of High-18F-FDG-Uptake Adipose Tissues over Orbit and Epicardium Correlate with Treatment Response for Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma
by Yu-Ming Huang, Chen-Hsi Hsieh, Shan-Ying Wang, Chin-Ho Tsao, Jehn-Chuan Lee and Yu-Jen Chen
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(3), 2158; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24032158 - 21 Jan 2023
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Abstract
Background: A regimen of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) is the standard treatment for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Brown adipose tissue possesses anti-cancer potential. This study aimed to explore practical biomarkers for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma by analyzing the metabolic activity of adipose tissue. Methods: [...] Read more.
Background: A regimen of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (R-CHOP) is the standard treatment for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Brown adipose tissue possesses anti-cancer potential. This study aimed to explore practical biomarkers for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma by analyzing the metabolic activity of adipose tissue. Methods: Twenty patients who received R-CHOP for non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma were reviewed. Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) images, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels, and body mass index (BMI) before and after treatment were collected. Regions with a high standardized uptake value (SUV) in epicardial and orbital adipose tissue were selected and analyzed by a PET/CT viewer. The initial measurements and changes in the high SUV of epicardial and orbital adipose tissues, LDH levels, and BMI of treatment responders and non-responders, and complete and partial responders, were compared. Results: The volumes of high-SUV epicardial and orbital adipose tissues significantly increased in responders after R-CHOP (p = 0.03 and 0.002, respectively). There were significant differences between changes in the high-SUV volumes of epicardial and orbital adipose tissues (p = 0.03 and 0.001, respectively) and LDH levels (p = 0.03) between responders and non-responders. The changes in high-SUV epicardial adipose tissue volumes were greater among complete responders than partial responders (p = 0.04). Poorer treatment responses were observed in patients with lower high-SUV epicardial adipose tissue volumes and higher LDH levels after R-CHOP (p = 0.03 and 0.03, respectively). Conclusions: The preliminary results of greater changes in high-SUV epicardial and orbital adipose tissue volumes among responders indicate that brown adipose tissue could be considered a favorable prognostic biomarker. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Crosstalk between Adipose Tissue and Cancer)
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Review

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22 pages, 1404 KiB  
Review
Oxidative Stress Linking Obesity and Cancer: Is Obesity a ‘Radical Trigger’ to Cancer?
by Mirna Jovanović, Sanja Kovačević, Jelena Brkljačić and Ana Djordjevic
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2023, 24(9), 8452; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24098452 - 8 May 2023
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2642
Abstract
Obesity is on the rise worldwide, and consequently, obesity-related non-communicable diseases are as well. Nutritional overload induces metabolic adaptations in an attempt to restore the disturbed balance, and the byproducts of the mechanisms at hand include an increased generation of reactive species. Obesity-related [...] Read more.
Obesity is on the rise worldwide, and consequently, obesity-related non-communicable diseases are as well. Nutritional overload induces metabolic adaptations in an attempt to restore the disturbed balance, and the byproducts of the mechanisms at hand include an increased generation of reactive species. Obesity-related oxidative stress causes damage to vulnerable systems and ultimately contributes to neoplastic transformation. Dysfunctional obese adipose tissue releases cytokines and induces changes in the cell microenvironment, promoting cell survival and progression of the transformed cancer cells. Other than the increased risk of cancer development, obese cancer patients experience higher mortality rates and reduced therapy efficiency as well. The fact that obesity is considered the second leading preventable cause of cancer prioritizes the research on the mechanisms connecting obesity to cancerogenesis and finding the solutions to break the link. Oxidative stress is integral at different stages of cancer development and advancement in obese patients. Hypocaloric, balanced nutrition, and structured physical activity are some tools for relieving this burden. However, the sensitivity of simultaneously treating cancer and obesity poses a challenge. Further research on the obesity–cancer liaison would offer new perspectives on prevention programs and treatment development. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Crosstalk between Adipose Tissue and Cancer)
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14 pages, 1158 KiB  
Review
Interplay between Prostate Cancer and Adipose Microenvironment: A Complex and Flexible Scenario
by Mathilde Cancel, William Pouillot, Karine Mahéo, Alix Fontaine, David Crottès and Gaëlle Fromont
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(18), 10762; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms231810762 - 15 Sep 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1860
Abstract
Adipose tissue is part of the prostate cancer (PCa) microenvironment not only in the periprostatic area, but also in the most frequent metastatic sites, such as bone marrow and pelvic lymph nodes. The involvement of periprostatic adipose tissue (PPAT) in the aggressiveness of [...] Read more.
Adipose tissue is part of the prostate cancer (PCa) microenvironment not only in the periprostatic area, but also in the most frequent metastatic sites, such as bone marrow and pelvic lymph nodes. The involvement of periprostatic adipose tissue (PPAT) in the aggressiveness of PCa is strongly suggested by numerous studies. Many molecules play a role in the reciprocal interaction between adipocytes and PCa cells, including adipokines, hormones, lipids, and also lipophilic pollutants stored in adipocytes. The crosstalk has consequences not only on cancer cell growth and metastatic potential, but also on adipocytes. Although most of the molecules released by PPAT are likely to promote tumor growth and the migration of cancer cells, others, such as the adipokine adiponectin and the n-6 or n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), have been shown to have anti-tumor properties. The effects of PPAT on PCa cells might therefore depend on the balance between the pro- and anti-tumor components of PPAT. In addition, genetic and environmental factors involved in the risk and/or aggressiveness of PCa, including obesity and diet, are able to modulate the interactions between PPAT and cancer cells and their consequences on the growth and the metastatic potential of PCa. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue The Crosstalk between Adipose Tissue and Cancer)
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