Special Issue "Surface and Subsurface Mapping"

A special issue of ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information (ISSN 2220-9964).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Waldemar Kociuba
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Faculty of Earth Sciences and Spatial Management, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University in Lublin, Al. Krasnicka 2 D, 20-718 Lublin, Poland
Interests: contemporary spatial and temporal river valley development and analysis of the geomorphic responses to rapid climatic and environmental changes; fluvial geomorphology and application of remote sensing (LiDAR, photogrammetry) to differential (DoD) surface changes analysis; Polar Regions (Svalbard) and Central Europe

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,


Day by day, technological progress helps us to increase the amount of publicly available data on the Earth’s surface. These data are characterized by various ranges of resolution (scaling from overview to decimeter) and information. Traditional topographic maps [2D] are being progressively replaced by orthophoto maps, or two-and-half [2.5D] and three-dimensional [3D] maps=>models. Thus, the way of mapping both the Earth’s surface and what is located underneath (subsurface) is also changing. Additionally, the challenge is to connect all this information in order to better understand contemporary environmental changes. The proposed Special Issue on ‘Surface and Subsurface Mapping’ is addressed at a wide range of specialists in various fields, both environmental researchers (geologists, hydrogeologists, geophysicists, geographers, geomorphologists, soil scientists) and specialists who deal with changes in urbanized areas (planners, social geographers etc.). We invite you to publish the results of works which focus on describing and mapping contemporary changes of landforms. The studies that we especially welcome are these which graphically present the effects of surface and subsurface changes. Such examples include: glaciers—mapping of the surface and the bottom, mapping of subglacial and supraglacial water outflow paths; Karst areas—coupling of surface and underground relief (caves); geological and hydrogeological—mapping with particular emphasis on surface and groundwater coupling (surface water network and land surface vs. groundwater ceiling/floor maps); mapping of the thickness of surface formations such as rocks, sediments, soil, etc. What is more, studies of urbanized areas (mapping of urban surface and subsurface infrastructure) and exploitation areas (plans of excavations and land surface related) are also welcome.

Dr. Waldemar Kociuba
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Modern mapping
  • Geo-information mapping
  • Mapping of surface phenomena
  • Mapping of subsurface phenomena
  • Mapping of natural processes
  • Mapping in spatial planning
  • Risk mapping
  • Cave plans
  • Plans for drifts and pits
  • Satellite data mapping
  • LiDAR data mapping
  • ALS and TLS data mapping
  • SfM data mapping
  • Photogrammetric data mapping
  • UAV and modern mapping
  • Geology mapping
  • Hydrogeology mapping
  • Geomorphology mapping
  • Glaciology mapping

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Paradigm of Geological Mapping of the Adıyaman Fault Zone of Eastern Turkey Using Landsat 8 Remotely Sensed Data Coupled with PCA, ICA, and MNFA Techniques
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(6), 368; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10060368 - 30 May 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 753
Abstract
A principal and independent component analysis (PCA and ICA) and a minimum noise fraction analysis (MNFA) were applied in this study to Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) images along the Adıyaman fault zone in Eastern Turkey. These analyses indicated that the lithologic [...] Read more.
A principal and independent component analysis (PCA and ICA) and a minimum noise fraction analysis (MNFA) were applied in this study to Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI) images along the Adıyaman fault zone in Eastern Turkey. These analyses indicated that the lithologic units, fault patterns, and the morphological and structural features can be mapped highly accurately by using spectral-matching techniques in regions where rocks are well exposed. An inspection of all possible band combinations indicated that the PCA 134 and 231 and the ICA 132 band combinations give the best false color composite images for identifying the lithological units and contacts. The findings of the MNFA band combinations show that the MNFA 521 band combination also is robust for discriminating the lithological units, particularly Quaternary clastic units (colluvium/alluvium). MNFA band 1 alone provides the best image for tracing the tectonic and structural elements in the study area. The new up-to-date lithologic map of the Adıyaman fault zone we produced upon the interpretation of the processed OLI images reveals several river channels that are offset and beheaded by the Adıyaman fault, which verifies its Quaternary activity. This study demonstrated that, when used with the OLI data, the PCA, ICA, and MNFA are very powerful for lithological and structural mapping in actively deforming tectonic zones and hence can be applied to other regions elsewhere in the world where the climate is arid to semiarid, and the vegetation cover is scarce. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface and Subsurface Mapping)
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Article
A New Methodology for Mapping Past Rockfall Events: From Mobile Crowdsourcing to Rockfall Simulation Validation
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2020, 9(9), 514; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi9090514 - 25 Aug 2020
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1163
Abstract
Rockfalls are one of the most common natural hazards in mountainous areas that pose high risk to people and their activities. Rockfall risk assessment is commonly performed with the use of models that can simulate the potential rockfall source, propagation and runout areas. [...] Read more.
Rockfalls are one of the most common natural hazards in mountainous areas that pose high risk to people and their activities. Rockfall risk assessment is commonly performed with the use of models that can simulate the potential rockfall source, propagation and runout areas. The quality of the models can be improved by collecting data on past rockfall events. Mobile crowdsourcing is becoming a common approach for collecting field data by using smartphones, the main advantages of which are the use of a harmonised protocol, and the possibility of creating large datasets due to the simultaneous use by multiple users. This paper presents a new methodology for collecting past rockfall events with a mobile application, where the locations and attributes of rockfall source areas and rockfall deposits are collected, and the data are stored in an online database which can be accessed via the WebGIS platform. The methodology also presents an approach for calculating an actual source location based on viewshed analysis which greatly reduces the problem of field mapping of inaccessible source areas. Additionally, we present a rockfall database in the Alpine Space that has been created by the presented methodology, and an application of collected data for the calibration and validation of two rockfall models (CONEFALL and Rockyfor3D). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface and Subsurface Mapping)
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Review

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Review
Utilization of Image, LiDAR and Gamma-Ray Information to Improve Environmental Sustainability of Cut-to-Length Wood Harvesting Operations in Peatlands: A Management Systems Perspective
ISPRS Int. J. Geo-Inf. 2021, 10(5), 273; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijgi10050273 - 23 Apr 2021
Viewed by 555
Abstract
Forest industry corporations use quality management systems in their wood procurement operations. Spatial quality data are used to improve the quality of wood harvesting and to achieve environmental sustainability. Some studies have proposed new management systems based on LiDAR. The main aim of [...] Read more.
Forest industry corporations use quality management systems in their wood procurement operations. Spatial quality data are used to improve the quality of wood harvesting and to achieve environmental sustainability. Some studies have proposed new management systems based on LiDAR. The main aim of this study was to investigate how efficiently planning systems can select areas for wood harvesting a priori with respect to avoiding harvesting damage caused by forest machinery. A literature review revealed the possibility of using GISs, and case studies showed the criteria required to predict the required quality levels. Terrestrial LiDAR can be utilized in authorities’ quality control systems, but it is inefficient for preplanning without terrestrial gamma-ray data collection. Airborne LiDAR and gamma-ray information about forest soils can only be used for planning larger regions at the forest level because the information includes too much uncertainty to allow it to be used for planning in small-sized areas before wood harvesting operations involving wood procurement. In addition, airborne LiDAR is not accurate enough, even at the forest level, for the planning of wood procurement systems because wood harvesting remains challenging without field measurements. Therefore, there is a need for the use of manual ground-penetrating radar for determining the peat layer thickness and the depth to the groundwater table. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface and Subsurface Mapping)
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