E-Mail Alert

Add your e-mail address to receive forthcoming issues of this journal:

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "Teenage Reproductive Health: Pregnancy, Contraception, Unsafe Abortion, Fertility"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 February 2018)

Printed Edition Available!
A printed edition of this Special Issue is available here.

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Jon Øyvind Odland

Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, The Norwegian University for Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
Website | E-Mail
Interests: reproductive health; epidemiology; environmental health; contaminants; arctic areas; infectious diseases; climate change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are organizing a Special Issue on Teenage Reproductive Health in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. The venue is a peer-reviewed scientific journal that publishes articles and communications in the interdisciplinary area of environmental health sciences and public health. For detailed information on the journal, we refer you to https://www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph

Maternal mortality is still globally high and reducing it is a top priority. Teenage pregnancies have more complications and are also unwanted in many cases. This contributes to the high maternal mortality with both obstetric complications and the burden of unsafe abortion. Additionally, many teenagers live in areas with heavy pollution that affect the mother and the unborn child. Global public health is a very important issue that aims to prevent disease, prolong life, and promote physical, mental, and social well-being. Teenagers are the future and maternal death is a disaster that should be prevented. Hence, research should aim to improve teenage reproductive health and influence policy makers.

This Special Issue is open to any subject related to teenage reproductive health and its link to the environment. The listed keywords suggest just a few of the many possibilities.

Prof. Dr. Jon Øyvind Odland
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Teenage pregnancies
  • Unwanted pregnancies
  • Unsafe abortion
  • Postabortion care
  • Contraception
  • Fertility
  • Environmental impacts on pregnancy, pregnancy outcome, and early child development

Published Papers (15 papers)

View options order results:
result details:
Displaying articles 1-15
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEditorial Teenage Reproductive Health: Pregnancy, Contraception, Unsafe Abortion, Fertility
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(6), 1176; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15061176
Received: 4 June 2018 / Accepted: 4 June 2018 / Published: 5 June 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (233 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
We are proud to present 14 papers with focus on teenager health in this Special Issue entitled “Teenage Reproductive Health: Pregnancy, Contraception, Unsafe Abortion, Fertility”. [...] Full article

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle Condom Use at Last Sexual Intercourse and Its Correlates among Males and Females Aged 15–49 Years in Nepal
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(3), 535; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15030535
Received: 14 December 2017 / Revised: 9 March 2018 / Accepted: 13 March 2018 / Published: 16 March 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (336 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study aimed to assess the prevalence and correlates of condom use at last sexual intercourse among people aged 15–49 years in Nepal. Secondary data analysis was performed using the Nepal Demographic and Health Survey 2011. The study was restricted to the respondents [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess the prevalence and correlates of condom use at last sexual intercourse among people aged 15–49 years in Nepal. Secondary data analysis was performed using the Nepal Demographic and Health Survey 2011. The study was restricted to the respondents who reported ever having had sexual intercourse; 9843 females and 3017 males were included. Condom use was assessed by asking if respondents used condoms in their most recent sexual intercourse. Chi-square test and multivariate logistic regression analysis were performed using Complex Sample Analysis Procedure to adjust for sample weight and multistage sampling design. Overall, 7.6% of total, and 16.3% of males and 6.2% of females reported using condoms in their last sexual intercourse. Living in Far-Western region, age and wealth quintile were positively associated with condom use in both males and females. Being unmarried was the most important predictor of condom use among males. Higher education was associated with increased likelihood of condom use in females. However, mobility, having multiple sexual partners, and HIV knowledge were not significant correlates of condom use in both sexes. A big difference was observed in the variance accounted for males and females; indicating use of condoms is poorly predicted by the variables included in the study among females. Condom use was more associated with sociodemographic factors than with sexual behavior and HIV knowledge. Full article
Open AccessArticle Young Women’s Perspectives of Their Adolescent Treatment Programs: A Qualitative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 373; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020373
Received: 29 January 2018 / Revised: 17 February 2018 / Accepted: 19 February 2018 / Published: 22 February 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (293 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
The perspectives of at-risk adolescent clients can play an important role in informing treatment services. The current study examines qualitative interview data from 15 young women with histories of maltreatment. Using a semi-structured qualitative interview approach, we asked the women to think retrospectively [...] Read more.
The perspectives of at-risk adolescent clients can play an important role in informing treatment services. The current study examines qualitative interview data from 15 young women with histories of maltreatment. Using a semi-structured qualitative interview approach, we asked the women to think retrospectively about their treatment experiences as adolescent girls. Results highlight the need for providing adolescent girls with reliable and practical information about risky sexual behavior and drug use from relatable and trustworthy helping professionals. We discuss strategies for developing and maintaining trust and delivering specific content. Full article
Open AccessArticle Adolescents’ Sexual Wellbeing in Southwestern Uganda: A Cross-Sectional Assessment of Body Image, Self-Esteem and Gender Equitable Norms
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 372; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020372
Received: 13 December 2017 / Revised: 31 January 2018 / Accepted: 31 January 2018 / Published: 22 February 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (291 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Measures of sexual wellbeing and positive aspects of sexuality in the World Health Organization definition for sexual health are rarely studied and remain poorly understood, especially among adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of this study was to assess sexual wellbeing in its [...] Read more.
Measures of sexual wellbeing and positive aspects of sexuality in the World Health Organization definition for sexual health are rarely studied and remain poorly understood, especially among adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa. The objective of this study was to assess sexual wellbeing in its broad sense—i.e., body image, self-esteem, and gender equitable norms—and associated factors in young adolescents in Uganda. A cross-sectional survey of adolescents ages 10–14 years in schools was carried out between June and July 2016. Among 1096 adolescents analyzed, the median age was 12 (Inter-Quartile Range (IQR): 11, 13) and 58% were female. Self-esteem and body image scores were high with median 24 (IQR: 22, 26, possible range: 7–28) and median 22 (IQR: 19, 24, possible range: 5–25) respectively. Gender equitable norms mean score was 28.1 (SD 5.2: possible range 11–44). We noted high scores for self-esteem and body image but moderate scores on gender equitable norms. Girls had higher scores compared to boys for all outcomes. A higher age and being sexually active were associated with lower scores on gender equitable norms. Gender equitable norms scores decreased with increasing age of adolescents. Comprehensive and timely sexuality education programs focusing on gender differences and norms are recommended. Full article
Open AccessArticle The Use of Manual Vacuum Aspiration in the Treatment of Incomplete Abortions: A Descriptive Study from Three Public Hospitals in Malawi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 370; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020370
Received: 1 February 2018 / Revised: 14 February 2018 / Accepted: 19 February 2018 / Published: 21 February 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (591 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Malawi has a high maternal mortality rate, of which unsafe abortion is a major cause. About 140,000 induced abortions are estimated every year, despite there being a restrictive abortion law in place. This leads to complications, such as incomplete abortions, which need to [...] Read more.
Malawi has a high maternal mortality rate, of which unsafe abortion is a major cause. About 140,000 induced abortions are estimated every year, despite there being a restrictive abortion law in place. This leads to complications, such as incomplete abortions, which need to be treated to avoid further harm. Although manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) is a safe and cheap method of evacuating the uterus, the most commonly used method in Malawi is curettage. Medical treatment is used sparingly in the country, and the Ministry of Health has been trying to increase the use of MVA. The aim of this study was to investigate the treatment of incomplete abortions in three public hospitals in Southern Malawi during a three-year period. All medical files from the female/gynecological wards from 2013 to 2015 were reviewed. In total, information on obstetric history, demographics, and treatment were collected from 7270 women who had been treated for incomplete abortions. The overall use of MVA at the three hospitals during the study period was 11.4% (95% CI, 10.7–12.1). However, there was a major increase in MVA application at one District Hospital. Why there was only one successful hospital in this study is unclear, but may be due to more training and dedicated leadership at this particular hospital. Either way, the use of MVA in the treatment of incomplete abortions continues to be low in Malawi, despite recommendations from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Malawi Ministry of Health. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Ten Years of Experience in Contraception Options for Teenagers in a Family Planning Center in Thrace and Review of the Literature
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 348; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020348
Received: 12 December 2017 / Revised: 9 February 2018 / Accepted: 12 February 2018 / Published: 15 February 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (330 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Introduction: The goal of our study was to investigate and evaluate the contraceptive behavior in teenagers from our family planning centre that services two different religious and socioeconomic populations living in the Thrace area. Methods: During the last 10 years 115 [...] Read more.
Introduction: The goal of our study was to investigate and evaluate the contraceptive behavior in teenagers from our family planning centre that services two different religious and socioeconomic populations living in the Thrace area. Methods: During the last 10 years 115 Christian Orthodox (group A) and 53 Muslim teenagers (group B) were enrolled in our retrospective study. Contraceptive practice attitudes were assessed by a questionnaire. Religion, demographics, socio-economic characteristics were key factors used to discuss contraception and avoid unplanned pregnancy in each group and to compare with the contraceptive method used. Results: The most used contraceptive method—about two times more frequently—among Christian Orthodox participants was the oral contraceptive pill (p = 0.015; OR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.13–2.90), while in the other group the use of condoms and IUDs was seven and three times more frequent, respectively. Our family planning centre was the main source of information for contraception. Conclusions: During adolescence, the existence of a family planning centre and participation in family planning programs plays a crucial role to help the teenagers to improve their knowledge and choose an effective contraception method. Full article
Open AccessArticle Factors Influencing Abortion Decision-Making Processes among Young Women
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 329; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020329
Received: 29 December 2017 / Revised: 10 February 2018 / Accepted: 11 February 2018 / Published: 13 February 2018
Cited by 5 | PDF Full-text (729 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: Decision-making about if and how to terminate a pregnancy is a dilemma for young women experiencing an unwanted pregnancy. Those women are subject to sociocultural and economic barriers that limit their autonomy and make them vulnerable to pressures that influence or force [...] Read more.
Background: Decision-making about if and how to terminate a pregnancy is a dilemma for young women experiencing an unwanted pregnancy. Those women are subject to sociocultural and economic barriers that limit their autonomy and make them vulnerable to pressures that influence or force decisions about abortion. Objective: The objective of this study was to explore the individual, interpersonal and environmental factors behind the abortion decision-making process among young Mozambican women. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted in Maputo and Quelimane. Participants were identified during a cross-sectional survey with women in the reproductive age (15–49). In total, 14 women aged 15 to 24 who had had an abortion participated in in-depth interviews. A thematic analysis was used. Results: The study found determinants at different levels, including the low degree of autonomy for women, the limited availability of health facilities providing abortion services and a lack of patient-centeredness of health services. Conclusions: Based on the results of the study, the authors suggest strategies to increase knowledge of abortion rights and services and to improve the quality and accessibility of abortion services in Mozambique. Full article
Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle Are Kazakhstani Women Satisfied with Antenatal Care? Implementing the WHO Tool to Assess the Quality of Antenatal Services
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 325; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020325
Received: 14 January 2018 / Revised: 9 February 2018 / Accepted: 10 February 2018 / Published: 13 February 2018
Cited by 1 | PDF Full-text (295 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Women’s satisfaction is a part of the quality assurance process with potential to improve antenatal health services. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of women’s satisfaction with antenatal care in an urban Kazakhstani setting and investigate associated factors. A [...] Read more.
Women’s satisfaction is a part of the quality assurance process with potential to improve antenatal health services. The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of women’s satisfaction with antenatal care in an urban Kazakhstani setting and investigate associated factors. A total of 1496 women who delivered in all maternity clinics from 6 February through 11 July 2013 in Semey, East Kazakhstan, filled out a standardized pretested questionnaire on satisfaction with antenatal care. Independent associations between dissatisfaction and its correlates were studied by logistic regression. Ninety percent of the women were satisfied with the antenatal care. Women who were dissatisfied had lower education. These women would have preferred more checkups, shorter intervals between checkups, more time with care providers, and shorter waiting times. The overall dissatisfaction was associated with long waiting times and insufficient information on general health in pregnancy, results of laboratory tests, treatment during pregnancy, and breastfeeding. Although most of the women in the study setting were satisfied with the new antenatal care model, we identified the main sources of dissatisfaction that should be addressed. Given that Semey is a typical Kazakhstani city, the results can be generalized to other Kazakhstani urban settings. Full article
Open AccessArticle “I Was Relieved to Know That My Baby Was Safe”: Women’s Attitudes and Perceptions on Using a New Electronic Fetal Heart Rate Monitor during Labor in Tanzania
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 302; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020302
Received: 15 December 2017 / Revised: 5 February 2018 / Accepted: 7 February 2018 / Published: 9 February 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (561 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
To increase labor monitoring and prevent neonatal morbidity and mortality, a new wireless, strap-on electronic fetal heart rate monitor called Moyo was introduced in Tanzania in 2016. As part of the ongoing evaluation of the introduction of the monitor, the aim of this [...] Read more.
To increase labor monitoring and prevent neonatal morbidity and mortality, a new wireless, strap-on electronic fetal heart rate monitor called Moyo was introduced in Tanzania in 2016. As part of the ongoing evaluation of the introduction of the monitor, the aim of this study was to explore the attitudes and perceptions of women who had worn the monitor continuously during their most recent delivery and perceptions about how it affected care. This knowledge is important to identify barriers towards adaptation in order to introduce new technology more effectively. We carried out 20 semi-structured individual interviews post-labor at two hospitals in Tanzania. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the data. Our results indicated that the use of the monitor positively affected the women’s birth experience. It provided much-needed reassurance about the wellbeing of the child. The women considered that wearing Moyo improved care due to an increase in communication and attention from birth attendants. However, the women did not fully understand the purpose and function of the device and overestimated its capabilities. This highlights the need to improve how and when information is conveyed to women in labor. Full article
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes among Adolescents in Northwest Russia: A Population Registry-Based Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 261; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020261
Received: 14 December 2017 / Revised: 29 January 2018 / Accepted: 30 January 2018 / Published: 3 February 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (334 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
This study aimed to assess whether adolescents have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) compared to adult women. We used data on 43,327 births from the population-based Arkhangelsk County Birth Registry, Northwest Russia, for 2012–2014. The perinatal outcomes included stillbirth, preterm [...] Read more.
This study aimed to assess whether adolescents have an increased risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes (APO) compared to adult women. We used data on 43,327 births from the population-based Arkhangelsk County Birth Registry, Northwest Russia, for 2012–2014. The perinatal outcomes included stillbirth, preterm birth (<37 and <32 weeks), low and very low birthweight, 5 min Apgar score <7 and <4, perinatal infections, and the need for neonatal transfer to a higher-level hospital. Multivariable logistic regression was applied to assess the associations between age and APO. Altogether, 4.7% of deliveries occurred in adolescents. Both folic acid intake and multivitamin intake during pregnancy were more prevalent in adults. Adolescents were more likely to be underweight, to smoke, and to have infections of the kidney and the genital tract compared to adult women. Compared to adults, adolescents were at lower risk of low birthweight, a 5 min Apgar score <7, and need for neonatal transfer. Adolescents had no increased risk of other APO studied in the adjusted analysis, suggesting that a constellation of other factors, but not young age per se, is associated with APO in the study setting. Full article
Open AccessArticle Factors Associated with Pregnancy among Married Adolescents in Nepal: Secondary Analysis of the National Demographic and Health Surveys from 2001 to 2011
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020229
Received: 12 December 2017 / Revised: 16 January 2018 / Accepted: 23 January 2018 / Published: 30 January 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (270 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Pregnancy-related morbidity and mortality are much more prevalent among adolescents than adults, particularly in low-income settings. Little is known about risk factors for pregnancy among adolescents in Nepal, but setting-specific evidence is needed to inform interventions. This study aimed to describe the prevalence, [...] Read more.
Pregnancy-related morbidity and mortality are much more prevalent among adolescents than adults, particularly in low-income settings. Little is known about risk factors for pregnancy among adolescents in Nepal, but setting-specific evidence is needed to inform interventions. This study aimed to describe the prevalence, and identify factors associated with pregnancy among adolescents in Nepal between 2001 and 2011. Secondary analyses of Nepal Demographic Health Surveys (NDHS) data from 2001, 2006, and 2011 were completed. The outcome was any pregnancy or birth among married adolescents; prevalence was calculated for each survey year. Although the rate of marriage among adolescent women in Nepal decreased significantly from 2001 to 2011, prevalence of pregnancy and birth among married adolescent women in Nepal remains high (average 56%) in Nepal, and increased significantly between 2001 and 2011. Regression analyses of this outcome indicate higher risk was associated with living in the least resourced region, early sexual debut, and older husband. Despite national efforts to reduce pregnancies among married adolescent women in Nepal, prevalence remains high. Integrated, cross-sectoral prevention efforts are required. Poverty reduction and infrastructure improvements may lead to lower rates of adolescent pregnancy. Full article
Open AccessArticle “Girls Have More Challenges; They Need to Be Locked Up”: A Qualitative Study of Gender Norms and the Sexuality of Young Adolescents in Uganda
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 193; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020193
Received: 15 December 2017 / Revised: 15 January 2018 / Accepted: 19 January 2018 / Published: 24 January 2018
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (297 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Unequal power and gender norms expose adolescent girls to higher risks of HIV, early marriages, pregnancies and coerced sex. In Uganda, almost half of the girls below the age of 18 are already married or pregnant, which poses a danger to the lives [...] Read more.
Unequal power and gender norms expose adolescent girls to higher risks of HIV, early marriages, pregnancies and coerced sex. In Uganda, almost half of the girls below the age of 18 are already married or pregnant, which poses a danger to the lives of young girls. This study explores the social construction of gender norms from early childhood, and how it influences adolescents’ agency. Contrary to the mainstream theory of agency, which focuses on the ability to make informed choices, adolescents’ agency appears constrained by context-specific obstacles. This study adopted qualitative research approaches involving 132 participants. Of these, 44 were in-depth interviews and 11 were focus group discussions, parcelled out into separate groups of adolescents (12–14 years), teachers, and parents (n = 88), in Western Uganda. Data were analysed manually using open and axial codes, and conclusions were inductive. Results show that gender norms are established early in life, and have a very substantial impact on the agency of young adolescents. There were stereotypical gender norms depicting boys as sexually active and girls as restrained; girls’ movements were restricted; their sexual agency constrained; and prevention of pregnancy was perceived as a girl’s responsibility. Programs targeting behavioural change need to begin early in the lives of young children. They should target teachers and parents about the values of gender equality and strengthen the legal system to create an enabling environment to address the health and wellbeing of adolescents. Full article
Open AccessArticle STI Knowledge in Berlin Adolescents
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 110; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010110
Received: 26 November 2017 / Revised: 18 December 2017 / Accepted: 19 December 2017 / Published: 10 January 2018
Cited by 3 | PDF Full-text (327 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) pose a significant threat to individual and public health. They disproportionately affect adolescents and young adults. In a cross-sectional study, we assessed self-rated and factual STI knowledge in a sample of 9th graders in 13 secondary schools in Berlin, [...] Read more.
Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) pose a significant threat to individual and public health. They disproportionately affect adolescents and young adults. In a cross-sectional study, we assessed self-rated and factual STI knowledge in a sample of 9th graders in 13 secondary schools in Berlin, Germany. Differences by age, gender, migrant background, and school type were quantified using bivariate and multivariable analyses. A total of 1177 students in 61 classes participated. The mean age was 14.6 (SD = 0.7), 47.5% were female, and 52.9% had at least one immigrant parent. Knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) was widespread, but other STIs were less known. For example, 46.2% had never heard of chlamydia, 10.8% knew of the HPV vaccination, and only 2.2% were aware that no cure exists for HPV infection. While boys were more likely to describe their knowledge as good, there was no general gender superiority in factual knowledge. Children of immigrants and students in the least academic schools had lower knowledge overall. Our results show that despite their particular risk to contract an STI, adolescents suffer from suboptimal levels of knowledge on STIs beyond HIV. Urgent efforts needed to improve adolescent STI knowledge in order to improve the uptake of primary and secondary prevention. Full article
Open AccessArticle Parents’ Perspectives on Family Sexuality Communication from Middle School to High School
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 107; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010107
Received: 18 December 2017 / Revised: 5 January 2018 / Accepted: 7 January 2018 / Published: 10 January 2018
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (292 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Parents’ conversations with teens about sex and relationships can play a critical role in improving teenage reproductive health by reducing teens’ risky sexual behavior. However, little is known about how teen-parent communication changes from early to middle adolescence and how parents can tailor [...] Read more.
Parents’ conversations with teens about sex and relationships can play a critical role in improving teenage reproductive health by reducing teens’ risky sexual behavior. However, little is known about how teen-parent communication changes from early to middle adolescence and how parents can tailor their communication to address their teens’ changing development and experiences during these periods. In this longitudinal qualitative study, U.S. parents (N = 23) participated in interviews when their teens were in early adolescence, then again when the teens were in middle adolescence. Participants were largely mothers and were from diverse racial/ethnic and educational backgrounds. Thematic analysis was used to assess continuity and change in parents’ perceptions of teen-parent communication. Findings showed that many parents adapted their conversations with their teens about sex and relationships as teens developed. Once teens had entered high school, more parents described feeling comfortable with their conversations. However, parents also more often reported that their teens responded negatively to the communication in high school than they had in middle school. These findings may help parents to anticipate their own as well as their teens’ responses to family conversations about sex at different developmental time points and to strategize how to effectively talk with their teens about sex and relationships to improve their teens’ overall reproductive health. Full article
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle “I Am Ready and Willing to Provide the Service … Though My Religion Frowns on Abortion”—Ghanaian Midwives’ Mixed Attitudes to Abortion Services: A Qualitative Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(12), 1501; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121501
Received: 27 October 2017 / Revised: 24 November 2017 / Accepted: 28 November 2017 / Published: 4 December 2017
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (277 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Background: Unsafe abortion is a major preventable public health problem and contributes to high mortality among women. Ghana has ratified international conventions to prevent unwanted pregnancies and provide safe abortion services, legally authorizing midwives to provide induced abortion services in certain circumstances. Objective: [...] Read more.
Background: Unsafe abortion is a major preventable public health problem and contributes to high mortality among women. Ghana has ratified international conventions to prevent unwanted pregnancies and provide safe abortion services, legally authorizing midwives to provide induced abortion services in certain circumstances. Objective: The aim of the study was to understand midwives’ readiness to be involved in legal induced abortions, should the law become less restricted in Ghana. Methods: A qualitative study design, with a topic guide for individual in-depth interviews of selected midwives, was adopted. The interviews were tape-recorded and analyzed using content analysis. Results: Participants emphasized their willingness to reduce maternal mortalities, their experiences of maternal deaths, and their passion for the health of pregnant women. Knowledge of Ghana’s abortion law was generally low. Different views were expressed regarding readiness to engage in abortion services. Some expressed it as being sinful and against their religion to assist in abortion care, whilst others felt it was good to save the lives of women. Conclusion: The midwives made it clear that unsafe abortions are common, stigmatizing and contributing to maternal mortality, issues that must be addressed. They made various suggestions to reduce this preventable tragedy. Full article
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top