Special Issue "Instruments and Interventions for Assessing, Supporting and Improving Self-Care"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 February 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Tiny Jaarsma
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping Univeristy, Building Kåkenhus, Room 6631, Campus Norrköping, Sweden
Interests: self-care; instruments; intervention; cardiology; chronic illness; e-Health; psychometrics
Prof. Dr. Anna E. Strömberg
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Linköping Univeristy, Building 511-001, Entrance 75, plan 13, Campus US, Sweden
Interests: self-care; instruments; family intervention; multidisciplinary; intervention; cardiology; chronic illness; e-Health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Adequate self-care is essential for all persons and includes physical, mental, social, and spiritual aspects of life. The scope of self-care includes health promotion, disease prevention, treatment, rehabilitation, and palliative care. Self-care is a process of maintaining health through health promoting and preventive practices. Although everyone (ill or healthy) is engaged in some level of self-care daily, the need for self-care and specific recommendations are more prominent once diagnosed with a disease. For patients with chronic illness, self-care is essential and the focus of most disease management programs worldwide. Patients who have more effective self-care behavior have been found to have better outcomes than those who undertake poor self-care.
There is increasing interest in improving knowledge about the different aspects of self-care. The number of self-care research studies is increasing worldwide and there is an urgent need for adequate measurement of self-care and evidence of effective interventions. In this Special Issue, we call for papers that address the measurement of self-care and papers that present findings from self-care intervention.

Prof. Dr. Tiny Jaarsma
Prof. Dr. Anna E. Strömberg
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • self-care
  • self-management
  • self-care monitoring
  • measurement
  • instruments
  • psychometrics
  • patients
  • caregivers
  • interventions
  • chronic disease
  • prevention

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Tools to Support Self-Care Monitoring at Home: Perspectives of Patients with Heart Failure
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 8916; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17238916 - 30 Nov 2020
Abstract
Self-care monitoring at home can be a challenge for patients with heart failure (HF). Tools that leverage information and communication technology (ICT), comprise medical devices, or have written material may support their efforts at home. The aim of this study was to describe [...] Read more.
Self-care monitoring at home can be a challenge for patients with heart failure (HF). Tools that leverage information and communication technology (ICT), comprise medical devices, or have written material may support their efforts at home. The aim of this study was to describe HF patients’ experiences and their prioritization of tools that support, or could support, self-care monitoring at home. A descriptive qualitative design employing semi-structured interviews was used with HF patients living at home and attending an HF outpatient clinic in Norway. We used a deductive analysis approach, using the concept of self-care monitoring with ICT tools, paper-based tools, medical devices, and tools to consult with healthcare professionals (HCPs) as the categorization matrix. Nineteen HF patients with a mean age of 64 years participated. ICT tools are used by individual participants to identify changes in their HF symptoms, but are not available by healthcare services. Paper-based tools, medical devices, and face-to-face consultation with healthcare professionals are traditional tools that are available and used by individual participants. HF patients use traditional and ICT tools to support recognizing, identifying, and responding to HF symptoms at home, suggesting that they could be used if they are available and supplemented by in-person consultation with HCPs. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Development and Psychometric Testing of the Self-Care in COVID-19 (SCOVID) Scale, an Instrument for Measuring Self-Care in the COVID-19 Pandemic
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 7834; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17217834 - 26 Oct 2020
Abstract
Aim: To develop the Self-Care in COVID-19 (SCOVID) scale and to test its psychometric characteristics in the general population. Methods: We tested SCOVID scale content validity with 19 experts. For factorial and construct validity, reliability, and measurement error, we administered the 20-item SCOVID [...] Read more.
Aim: To develop the Self-Care in COVID-19 (SCOVID) scale and to test its psychometric characteristics in the general population. Methods: We tested SCOVID scale content validity with 19 experts. For factorial and construct validity, reliability, and measurement error, we administered the 20-item SCOVID scale to a sample of 461 Italians in May/June 2020 (mean age: 48.8, SD ± 15.8). Results: SCOVID scale item content validity ranged between 0.85–1.00, and the total scale content validity was 0.94. Confirmatory factor analysis supported SCOVID scale factorial validity (comparative fit index = 0.91; root mean square error of approximation = 0.05). Construct validity was supported by significant correlations with other instrument scores measuring self-efficacy, positivity, quality of life, anxiety, and depression. Reliability estimates were good with factor score determinacy, composite reliability, global reliability index, Cronbach’s alpha, and test-retest reliability ranging between 0.71–0.91. The standard error of measurement was adequate. Conclusions: The SCOVID scale is a new instrument measuring self-care in the COVID-19 pandemic with adequate validity and reliability. The SCOVID scale can be used in practice and research for assessing self-care in the COVID-19 pandemic to preventing COVID-19 infection and maintaining wellbeing in the general population. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Perspectives of Health Care Providers on the Role of Culture in the Self-Care of Patients with Chronic Heart Failure: A Qualitative Interview Study
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(14), 5051; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17145051 - 14 Jul 2020
Abstract
Background: Self-care is important in chronic diseases such as heart failure. The cultural background of health care providers might influence their view on self-care behaviour and education they provide. The aim of this study was to describe health care providers’ perceptions of the [...] Read more.
Background: Self-care is important in chronic diseases such as heart failure. The cultural background of health care providers might influence their view on self-care behaviour and education they provide. The aim of this study was to describe health care providers’ perceptions of the role of culture in self-care and how those perceptions shape their experiences and their practices. Methods: A qualitative study was performed in Israel, a country with a culturally diverse population. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews with 12 healthcare providers from different cultural backgrounds. Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. Results: Healthcare providers experienced cultural background influenced their patients’ self-care behaviour. Perceived culture-specific barriers to self-care such as dietary traditions interfering with the recommended diet, willingness to undertake self-care and beliefs conflicting with medical treatment were identified. Healthcare providers described that they adapted patient education and care based on the cultural background of the patients. Shared cultural background, awareness and knowledge of differences were described as positively influencing self-care education, while cultural differences could complicate this process. Conclusions: Cultural-specific barriers for self-care were perceived by health care providers and they identified that their own cultural background shapes their experiences and their practices. Full article

Review

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Open AccessReview
Status of Theory Use in Self-Care Research
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9480; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249480 - 17 Dec 2020
Abstract
Background: Theories can provide a foundation to explain behavior, investigate relationships, and to predict the effect of interventions. The aim of the study was to clarify the use of theories in studies testing interventions to promote self-care. Method: A scoping review. PubMed, EMBASE, [...] Read more.
Background: Theories can provide a foundation to explain behavior, investigate relationships, and to predict the effect of interventions. The aim of the study was to clarify the use of theories in studies testing interventions to promote self-care. Method: A scoping review. PubMed, EMBASE, PsychINFO, and CINAHL were searched from January 2008 through January 2019. Nine common chronic conditions were included. We included studies testing a self-care intervention if they used a randomized controlled trial design. The study was registered in PROSPERO (#123719). Results: The search retrieved 9309 potential studies, of which 233 were included in the review. In total, 76 (33%) of the 233 studies used a theory and 24 different theories were used. Bandura’s social cognitive theory was the most frequently used (48 studies), but 22 other theories were used in a minority of studies. Most studies used theories minimally to justify or provide a rationale for the study, to develop the intervention, to select outcomes, and/or to explain the results. Only eight studies fully used a theory in the rationale, intervention development, choice of outcomes, and discussion. Conclusion: The use of theories to guide self-care research is limited, which may pose a barrier in accumulating knowledge underlying self-care interventions. Full article
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