Special Issue "The Dark Side and the Light Side of Technology Related Stress and Stress related to Workplace Innovations. From Artificial Intelligence to Business Transformations"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Digital Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Gabriele Giorgi
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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, Università Europea di Roma, Italy
Interests: emotional intelligence; stress; workplace bullying; PTSD
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Prof. Antonio Ariza-Montes
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Guest Editor
Department of Management, Universidad Loyola Andalucía, Spain
Interests: stress, social innovation, nonprofit organizations
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Prof. Nicola Mucci
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Guest Editor
Department of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, University of Florence, Italy
Interests: work-related stress; workplace bullying; sustainable development; work shifts; occupational health
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Prof. Dr. Antonio Luis Leal-Rodríguez
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Guest Editor
Department of Business Management and Marketing, Universidad de Sevilla, Av. Ramón y Cajal 1, 41018 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: innovation; knowledge management; entrepreneurship; sustainability
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As a result of rapid and profondous organizational changes, worldwide, work-related stress problems have substantially increased, as noted by scientist, practitioners, and institutions such as WHO, ILO, and EU-OSHA.

These changes are driven by pressing innovations; structural, technological, and communication transformations; economic developments; and social changes. Technological transformations seem increasingly pressing and are expected to shape the future of employees’ health through misuse, abuse, and overuse, resulting in technostress.

The use of technological innovations in the organizational context needs to be ethical. Indeed, worldwide changes in production processes are expected due to the deployment of machines, robots, and artificial intelligence. These technological changes may mean a jobless future for some individuals and job opportunities for those who can adapt to rapid change. Looking ahead to 2030, formal work participation rates are expected to continue their long-term decline, increasing economic stress, fears of unemployability, and anxiety in the workplace.

Similarly, digital work is another pressing challenge. Constant digital connectivity allows work to be performed at any time and from almost anywhere. However, the effects of digital work on working conditions seems ambiguous and contradictory. Thus, digitalization may improve work-life balance and autonomy but it may also be harmful to individuals’ rest and recovery and may correlate with a rise in work-related stress and illness.

This research topic is particularly interested in manuscripts that offer insights into the relationship between innovations and health. We encourage a focus on how technological innovation, and digital and robotic transformation, will shape the health and productivity of individuals and organizations, not least because the emergence of congruent and incongruent associations, and linear and curvilinear relations, among these constructs makes research fundamental.

Prof. Gabriele Giorgi
Prof. Antonio Ariza-Montes
Prof. Nicola Mucci
Prof. Antonio Leal-Rodríguez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Innovation
  • Occupational health
  • Business
  • Techno-anxiety
  • Techno-addiction
  • Techno-strain
  • Job design
  • Artificial intelligence
  • Economic stress
  • Work-related stress.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
How Does Positive Work-Related Stress Affect the Degree of Innovation Development?
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(2), 520; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17020520 - 14 Jan 2020
Abstract
Many studies sustain that work-related stress exerts pervasive consequences on the employees’ levels of performance, productivity, and wellbeing. However, it remains unclear whether certain levels of stress might lead to positive outcomes regarding employees’ innovativeness. Hence, this paper examines how the five dimensions [...] Read more.
Many studies sustain that work-related stress exerts pervasive consequences on the employees’ levels of performance, productivity, and wellbeing. However, it remains unclear whether certain levels of stress might lead to positive outcomes regarding employees’ innovativeness. Hence, this paper examines how the five dimensions of work-related stress impact on the employees’ levels of innovation performance. To this aim, this study focused on a sample of 1487 employees from six Italian companies. To test the research hypotheses under assessment, we relied on the use of the partial least squares (PLS) technique. Our results reveal that, in summary, the stressors job autonomy, job demands, and role ambiguity exert a positive and significant impact on the employees’ levels of innovativeness. However, this study failed to find evidence that the supervisors’ support–innovation and colleagues’ support–innovation links are not statistically significant. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Relationship Amongst Technology Use, Work Overload, and Psychological Detachment from Work
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4602; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234602 - 20 Nov 2019
Abstract
Permanent connection to the work world as a result of new technologies raises the possibility of workday extensions and excessive workloads. The present study addresses the relationship between technology and psychological detachment from work resulting from work overload. Participants were 313 professionals from [...] Read more.
Permanent connection to the work world as a result of new technologies raises the possibility of workday extensions and excessive workloads. The present study addresses the relationship between technology and psychological detachment from work resulting from work overload. Participants were 313 professionals from the health sector who responded to three instruments used in similar studies. Through PLS-SEM, regression and dependence analyses were developed, and through the bootstrapping method, significance of factor loadings, path coefficients and variances were examined. Results of the study corroborate a negative effect of technology use on psychological detachment from work and a positive correlation between technology and work overload. Additionally, there is a significant indirect effect of technology on psychological detachment from work as a result of work overload. Findings extend the literature related to the stressor-detachment model, and support the idea that workers who are often connected to their jobs by technological tools are less likely to reach adequate psychological detachment levels. Implications for the academic community and practitioners are discussed. Full article
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