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Open AccessArticle

Relationship Amongst Technology Use, Work Overload, and Psychological Detachment from Work

1
Academic Department of Social Psychology and Organizations, Faculty of Psychology, Universidad de la Sabana, 250001 Cundinamarca, Colombia
2
Faculty of Business Science, Universidad del Pacífico, Lima, Peru
3
Faculty of Management, Universidad Externado de Colombia, Bogota, Colombia
4
Faculty of Economic and Business Sciences, Universidad de Sevilla, 41004 Seville, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(23), 4602; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234602
Received: 16 October 2019 / Revised: 13 November 2019 / Accepted: 18 November 2019 / Published: 20 November 2019
Permanent connection to the work world as a result of new technologies raises the possibility of workday extensions and excessive workloads. The present study addresses the relationship between technology and psychological detachment from work resulting from work overload. Participants were 313 professionals from the health sector who responded to three instruments used in similar studies. Through PLS-SEM, regression and dependence analyses were developed, and through the bootstrapping method, significance of factor loadings, path coefficients and variances were examined. Results of the study corroborate a negative effect of technology use on psychological detachment from work and a positive correlation between technology and work overload. Additionally, there is a significant indirect effect of technology on psychological detachment from work as a result of work overload. Findings extend the literature related to the stressor-detachment model, and support the idea that workers who are often connected to their jobs by technological tools are less likely to reach adequate psychological detachment levels. Implications for the academic community and practitioners are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: technology use; work overload; psychological detachment; psychological well-being; PLS-SEM technology use; work overload; psychological detachment; psychological well-being; PLS-SEM
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sandoval-Reyes, J.; Acosta-Prado, J.C.; Sanchís-Pedregosa, C. Relationship Amongst Technology Use, Work Overload, and Psychological Detachment from Work. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 4602. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234602

AMA Style

Sandoval-Reyes J, Acosta-Prado JC, Sanchís-Pedregosa C. Relationship Amongst Technology Use, Work Overload, and Psychological Detachment from Work. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(23):4602. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234602

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sandoval-Reyes, Juan; Acosta-Prado, Julio C.; Sanchís-Pedregosa, Carlos. 2019. "Relationship Amongst Technology Use, Work Overload, and Psychological Detachment from Work" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 16, no. 23: 4602. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16234602

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