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Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Occupational Safety and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2021) | Viewed by 121200

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Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Social Psychology, Universidad de Sevilla, Calle Camilo José Cela s/n, 41018 Sevilla, Spain
Interests: psychosocial risks at work; interpersonal conflicts; stressor-strain relationship; intervention effectiveness; health promotion.
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Guest Editor
Department of Psychology, University of Central Florida, Psychology Building, 4111 Pictor Lane, Orlando, 32816 FL, USA
Interests: work stress; counterproductive work behavior; job insecurity; adaptability; interpersonal interactions at work

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Guest Editor
Department of Human Resources and Organizational Behavior, ISCTE-Business School, Avda. das Forças Armadas s/n, 1649-026 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: presenteeism; recruitment and selection; assessment; intervention effectiveness; cyber-bullying

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The world of work is changing dramatically due to continuous technological advancements and globalization (the so-called ‘industry 4.0’), the health crisis due to the COVID-19 outbreak, and the looming ongoing global economic crisis, which have forced adaptation to new ways of organizing work that were only timidly incorporated during the last few decades (e.g., working from home and teleworking), or social movements such as a renewed feminist movement or those trying to offer more sustainable alternatives to the current neoliberalist economic model and the demand-driven manufacturing system, among other factors.

All these factors have contributed to the emergence of new psychosocial risks for employees’ health and well-being, which are challenging the existing theoretical models and evidence-based practices in Occupational Health Psychology. Moreover, several studies have shown that workers’ health and well-being can be at higher risk when organizations face relevant changes and economic turbulence (Giorgi, Leon-Perez, & Shoss, 2015). Therefore, this Special Issue on “Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology” in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health aims to publish manuscripts that contribute to: (1) a better understanding of new issues and challenges for Occupational Health Psychology in the post-COVID era; and (2) implementing measures to develop more sustainable and healthy organizations.

We welcome original research papers, brief reports, and review articles. In particular, we invite the submission of empirical papers that offer strong theoretical approaches, apply rigorous methodological standards (e.g., longitudinal and temporal multilevel designs, or studies that combine multiple sources of information), and provide information about effective measures and interventions. We will accept manuscripts from different disciplines, including organizational psychology, occupational health and safety, epidemiology, human resources management, sociology, or preventive medicine. Topics of interest to this Special Issue include, but are not limited to:

  • new factors and processes relevant to employees’ health and well-being;
  • contextual factors and socioeconomic factors that impact upon employees’ behavior and well-being;
  • multilevel perspectives in Occupational Health Psychology (employees, leaders, teams, organizations, sectors, countries);
  • changes in relationships between employees’ behavior and their colleagues or customers over time;
  • methodological advances and the use of innovative technologies (such as virtual reality, fMRI, eye-tracking, and cortisol measurements) to improve employees’ health and well-being;
  • non-linear relationships between psychosocial risk factors and health;
  • examining the return-on-investment and impact of occupational health and safety measures; and
  • examining the effectiveness of online and virtual interventions to improve employees’ well-being

Dr. Jose M. León-Pérez
Dr. Mindy K. Shoss
Dr. Aristides I. Ferreira
Dr. Gabriele Giorgi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Employees’ health and well-being
  • Work stressors
  • Psychosocial risks
  • Changing environments, Organizational development
  • Health and safety

Published Papers (22 papers)

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Editorial

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4 pages, 284 KiB  
Editorial
Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology
by Jose M. León-Pérez, Mindy K. Shoss, Aristides I. Ferreira and Gabriele Giorgi
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(21), 11621; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182111621 - 05 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1891
Abstract
The world of work is changing dramatically due to continuous technological advancements and globalization (the so-called industry 4 [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)

Research

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20 pages, 431 KiB  
Article
Healthy Leadership and Workplace Health Promotion as a Pre-Requisite for Organizational Health
by Isabell Koinig and Sandra Diehl
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9260; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179260 - 02 Sep 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 5012
Abstract
(1) Background: Increasing stress levels at the workplace constitute a concerning organizational trend, challenging not only employees but also organizations alike, as it is in most instances associated with increasing workloads. In consequence, employees have started to demand that organizations begin to accept [...] Read more.
(1) Background: Increasing stress levels at the workplace constitute a concerning organizational trend, challenging not only employees but also organizations alike, as it is in most instances associated with increasing workloads. In consequence, employees have started to demand that organizations begin to accept responsibility for their health and well-being. The present contribution seeks to investigate, to which extent individuals are able to deal with stress and whether their employers and respective supervisors (leaders) accept responsibility for their health, for instance, by leading by example. In addition, the existence and support generated by the organization in form of Workplace Health Promotion (WPHP) is inquired. (2) Methods: Semi-structured qualitative interviews with 40 (full and part-time) employees from two European countries were conducted. (3) Results: The study with employees from Austria and Germany (n = 40) confirmed that employees have started to recognize the potential of the workplace as an environment, where individual health can be enhanced. Yet, the results showed that only a few companies have already put some WPHP measures into practice. Likewise, the implementation of healthy leadership is rather limited to date. (4) Conclusions: At present, companies are still more likely to delegate responsibility for employee health and well-being to their staff, having not fully realized the potential of healthy leadership and organizational health promotion. There is great potential to increase WPHP measures on the employer side, through both healthy leadership and supporting WPHP measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
13 pages, 722 KiB  
Article
The Cross-Level Moderation Effect of Resource-Providing Leadership on the Demands—Work Ability Relationship
by Anne Richter, Marta Roczniewska, Carina Loeb, Christiane R. Stempel and Thomas Rigotti
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9084; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179084 - 28 Aug 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2691
Abstract
Employees in female-dominated sectors are exposed to high workloads, emotional job demands, and role ambiguity, and often have insufficient resources to deal with these demands. This imbalance causes strain, threatening employees’ work ability. The aim of this study was to examine whether resource-providing [...] Read more.
Employees in female-dominated sectors are exposed to high workloads, emotional job demands, and role ambiguity, and often have insufficient resources to deal with these demands. This imbalance causes strain, threatening employees’ work ability. The aim of this study was to examine whether resource-providing leadership at the workplace level buffers against the negative repercussions of these job demands on work ability. Employees (N = 2383) from 290 work groups across three countries (Germany, Finland, and Sweden) in female-dominated sectors were asked to complete questionnaires in this study. Employees rated their immediate supervisor’s resource-providing leadership and also self-reported their work ability, role ambiguity, workload, and emotional demands. Multilevel modeling was performed to predict individual work ability with job demands as employee-level predictors, and leadership as a group-level predictor. Work ability was poor when employees reported high workloads, high role ambiguity, and high emotional demands. Resource-providing leadership at the group level had a positive impact on employees’ work ability. We observed a cross-level interaction between emotional demands and resource-providing leadership. We conclude that resource-providing leadership buffers against the repercussions of emotional demands for the work ability of employees in female-dominated sectors; however, it is not influential in dealing with workload or role ambiguity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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13 pages, 739 KiB  
Article
Interpersonal Conflicts in the Unit Impact the Service Quality Rated by Customers: The Mediating Role of Work-Unit Well-Being
by Miriam Benitez, Jose M. Leon-Perez, Alejandro Orgambídez and Francisco J. Medina
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(15), 8137; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18158137 - 31 Jul 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3507
Abstract
Social dynamics at work are crucial for understanding how internal processes in an organization are related to their performance and productivity. Following the Service-Profit Chain (SPC) theory, this study analyses, at the work-unit level, how interpersonal conflicts are related to service quality in [...] Read more.
Social dynamics at work are crucial for understanding how internal processes in an organization are related to their performance and productivity. Following the Service-Profit Chain (SPC) theory, this study analyses, at the work-unit level, how interpersonal conflicts are related to service quality in the hospitality and tourism industry through the shared experience of well-being in the work unit. In other words, we examine the mediating role of two main aspects of work-related well-being in the unit (job satisfaction and burnout) on the relationship between interpersonal conflicts in the unit and customers’ perceptions of service quality. To do so, we conducted a cross-sectional survey study that collected data from 398 service employees (91 work units) and 1233 customers from three and four-star hotels with restaurant in Spain. Using path analysis in Structural Equation Models, our results supported a full mediation model at the work-unit level: interpersonal conflicts in the work unit are related to customers’ service quality perceptions through the work-unit’s well-being (job satisfaction and burnout). Therefore, our findings extend the SPC theory by integrating group dynamics and employees’ experiences, which should be enhanced through occupational health-oriented policies and practices to increase service quality. In this sense, this study has implications for the development of intervention programs aiming at improving the occupational well-being and quality of service in hospitality and tourism settings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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14 pages, 922 KiB  
Article
COVID-19 Pandemic as a Traumatic Event and Its Associations with Fear and Mental Health: A Cognitive-Activation Approach
by Martin Sanchez-Gomez, Gabriele Giorgi, Georgia Libera Finstad, Flavio Urbini, Giulia Foti, Nicola Mucci, Salvatore Zaffina and José M. León-Perez
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7422; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147422 - 12 Jul 2021
Cited by 49 | Viewed by 4857
Abstract
The COVID-19 global pandemic still represents a major threat with detrimental health consequences. Analyzing the psychological outcomes, COVID-19 could be interpreted as a collective traumatic event that can generate symptoms related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Considering this, the purpose of this paper [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 global pandemic still represents a major threat with detrimental health consequences. Analyzing the psychological outcomes, COVID-19 could be interpreted as a collective traumatic event that can generate symptoms related to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Considering this, the purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate the relationship between intrusive thoughts and fear related to the COVID-19 pandemic and between intrusive thoughts and mental health; second, to test the mediating role of hyperarousal and avoidance in these two relationships. In order to reach these aims, the present study investigated these relationships and tested a mediation model in two cross-sectional studies in Italy. Altogether, 627 individuals and 495 workers completed an online survey for study 1 and study 2, respectively. Mediation analyses were performed via the SPSS macro PROCESS; the significance of total, direct, and indirect effect was tested via bootstrapping. The results showed that within the PTSD framework, hyperarousal compared with avoidance mediated the relationship between intrusion and the analyzed outcomes. In conclusion, the present study provided empirical evidence for the influence of hyperarousal on individual consequences such as fear of COVID-19 and mental health. Research, as well as theoretical and practical implications, are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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19 pages, 656 KiB  
Article
Factors Influencing Adjustment to Remote Work: Employees’ Initial Responses to the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Ward van Zoonen, Anu Sivunen, Kirsimarja Blomqvist, Thomas Olsson, Annina Ropponen, Kaisa Henttonen and Matti Vartiainen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6966; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136966 - 29 Jun 2021
Cited by 43 | Viewed by 21615
Abstract
The COVID-19 crisis has disrupted when, where, and how employees work. Drawing on a sample of 5452 Finnish employees, this study explores the factors associated with employees’ abrupt adjustment to remote work. Specifically, this study examines structural factors (i.e., work independence and the [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 crisis has disrupted when, where, and how employees work. Drawing on a sample of 5452 Finnish employees, this study explores the factors associated with employees’ abrupt adjustment to remote work. Specifically, this study examines structural factors (i.e., work independence and the clarity of job criteria), relational factors (i.e., interpersonal trust and social isolation), contextual factors of work (i.e., change in work location and perceived disruption), and communication dynamics (i.e., organizational communication quality and communication technology use (CTU)) as mechanisms underlying adjustment to remote work. The findings demonstrate that structural and contextual factors are important predictors of adjustment and that these relationships are moderated by communication quality and CTU. Contrary to previous research, trust in peers and supervisors does not support adjustment to remote work. We discuss the implications of these findings for practice during and beyond times of crisis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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27 pages, 1752 KiB  
Article
Exploring the Engaged Worker over Time—A Week-Level Study of How Positive and Negative Work Events Affect Work Engagement
by Oliver Weigelt, Antje Schmitt, Christine J. Syrek and Sandra Ohly
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(13), 6699; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18136699 - 22 Jun 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2536
Abstract
Although work events can be regarded as pivotal elements of organizational life, only a few studies have examined how positive and negative events relate to and combine to affect work engagement over time. Theory suggests that, to better understand how current events affect [...] Read more.
Although work events can be regarded as pivotal elements of organizational life, only a few studies have examined how positive and negative events relate to and combine to affect work engagement over time. Theory suggests that, to better understand how current events affect work engagement (WE), we have to account for recent events that have preceded these current events. We present competing theoretical views on how recent and current work events may affect employees (e.g., getting used to a high frequency of negative events or becoming more sensitive to negative events). Although the occurrence of events implies discrete changes in the experience of work, prior research has not considered whether work events actually accumulate to sustained mid-term changes in WE. To address these gaps in the literature, we conducted a week-level longitudinal study across a period of 15 consecutive weeks among 135 employees, which yielded 849 weekly observations. While positive events were associated with higher levels of WE within the same week, negative events were not. Our results support neither satiation nor sensitization processes. However, a high frequency of negative events in the preceding week amplified the beneficial effects of positive events on WE in the current week. Growth curve analyses show that the benefits of positive events accumulate to sustain high levels of WE. WE dissipates in the absence of a continuous experience of positive events. Our study adds a temporal component by highlighting that positive events affect work engagement, particularly in light of recent negative events. Our study informs research that has taken a feature-oriented perspective on the dynamic interplay of job demands and resources. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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14 pages, 1113 KiB  
Article
Technostress of Chilean Teachers in the Context of the COVID-19 Pandemic and Teleworking
by Carla Estrada-Muñoz, Alejandro Vega-Muñoz, Dante Castillo, Sheyla Müller-Pérez and Joan Boada-Grau
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(10), 5458; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18105458 - 20 May 2021
Cited by 40 | Viewed by 5594
Abstract
This article shows the levels of technostress in primary and secondary education teachers in Chile, in the context of educational telework that Chile has adopted in connection with the health crisis by COVID-19. The information has been collected with the use of the [...] Read more.
This article shows the levels of technostress in primary and secondary education teachers in Chile, in the context of educational telework that Chile has adopted in connection with the health crisis by COVID-19. The information has been collected with the use of the RED-TIC scale, previously used in this country, whose validity and reliability of the instrument has been treated, for this case, with confirmatory factorial analysis (CFA) with a national coverage sample of 3006 teachers. The results show that 11% of teachers reveal techno anxiety and 7.2%, techno fatigue. Combining both manifestations, we find that 6.8% of teachers are techno stressed. Finally, fatigue and anxiety factors are higher for female teachers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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10 pages, 1036 KiB  
Article
Presenteeism and Productivity: The Role of Biomarkers and Hormones
by Aristides I. Ferreira, Amalia R. Pérez-Nebra, Eva Ellen Costa, Maria Luisa A. Aguiar, Adriane Zambonato, Carla G. Costa, João G. Modesto and Paula da Costa Ferreira
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 5014; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18095014 - 10 May 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2668
Abstract
Purpose. This study aimed to assess whether self-reported productivity despite presenteeism may be affected by biomarkers and hormones and how these physiological indicators can interact with each other to explain the presenteeism dimensions. Methods. This pilot study included 180 healthy participants with a [...] Read more.
Purpose. This study aimed to assess whether self-reported productivity despite presenteeism may be affected by biomarkers and hormones and how these physiological indicators can interact with each other to explain the presenteeism dimensions. Methods. This pilot study included 180 healthy participants with a mean age of 41.22 years (SD = 13.58), 76.11% of whom were female. The dependent variable included a self-reported measure of productivity loss due to presenteeism: the Stanford Presenteeism Scale 6. This study also includes physiological indicators such as biomarkers (C-reactive protein (CRP) and blood glucose) and hormones (cortisol and TSH thyroid hormone). Results. Multiple linear regression analyses revealed that CRP moderated the relationship between cortisol levels and productivity despite presenteeism. Moreover, the increase of TSH moderated the relationship between cortisol, glycemia, and employees’ capacity to complete work tasks while sick. Conclusions. The results highlight TSH’s moderating role in decreasing employees’ capacity to fulfill tasks when these individuals have high levels of glycemia and cortisol in their blood. These findings have practical and theoretical implications based on a fuller understanding of how biomarkers and hormones explain productivity despite presenteeism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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21 pages, 1479 KiB  
Article
On the Dynamics of the Psychosocial Work Environment and Employee Well-Being: A Latent Transition Approach
by Ieva Urbanaviciute, Koorosh Massoudi, Cecilia Toscanelli and Hans De Witte
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(9), 4744; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18094744 - 29 Apr 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2502
Abstract
The current study investigates employee well-being in stable versus changing psychosocial working conditions, using the Job Demand-Control theoretical framework. It thereby addresses a gap in the literature dealing with how the dynamics of the work environment may affect different aspects of well-being, such [...] Read more.
The current study investigates employee well-being in stable versus changing psychosocial working conditions, using the Job Demand-Control theoretical framework. It thereby addresses a gap in the literature dealing with how the dynamics of the work environment may affect different aspects of well-being, such as job satisfaction, work stress, mental health complaints, and overall quality of life. The study was carried out on a large heterogeneous sample of employees in Switzerland (N = 959) and was based on two measurement points. Latent profile and latent transition analyses were used to analyse the data. The findings revealed three commonly encountered and temporally quite stable patterns of job characteristics (i.e., latent profiles), defined by low, average, or high job control and average job demands. The average demand-low control combination was the most precarious, whereas a combination of average demands and high control was the most beneficial and it clearly outperformed the balanced average demands-average control pattern. Furthermore, our results partially supported the claim that employee well-being is contingent on the dynamics (i.e., transition scenarios) of the psychosocial work environment. They particularly highlight the central role of job resources in preventing the deleterious effects on well-being, which may occur even in relatively mild situations where job demands are not excessive. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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16 pages, 494 KiB  
Article
Effect of Employees’ Perceived Green HRM on Their Workplace Green Behaviors in Oil and Mining Industries: Based on Cognitive-Affective System Theory
by Silu Chen, Wanxing Jiang, Xin Li and Han Gao
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(8), 4056; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18084056 - 12 Apr 2021
Cited by 43 | Viewed by 6147
Abstract
Drawing on cognitive-affective system theory, this study proposes that employees’ perceived green human resource management (HRM) influences their’ workplace green behaviors through two psychological processes: the cognitive and the affective route. By analysing 358 questionnaires collected from Chinese firms in the oil and [...] Read more.
Drawing on cognitive-affective system theory, this study proposes that employees’ perceived green human resource management (HRM) influences their’ workplace green behaviors through two psychological processes: the cognitive and the affective route. By analysing 358 questionnaires collected from Chinese firms in the oil and mining industry, we obtain evidence in support of our predictions, finding that employees’ perceived green HRM positively impacts their voluntary workplace green behaviors and green creativity. Additionally, green psychological climate and harmonious environmental passion are found to partially mediate the relationship between employees’ perceived green HRM and voluntary workplace green behavior while harmonious environmental passion is found to fully mediate the relationship between employees’ perceived green HRM and green creativity. These findings shed light on the importance of green HRM in shaping employees’ proactive workplace green behaviors and uncover how green HRM transforms employees’ cognitive, affective, and motivational (CAM) factors into green actions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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16 pages, 717 KiB  
Article
Does Paradoxical Leadership Facilitate Leaders’ Task Performance? A Perspective of Self-Regulation Theory
by Silu Chen, Yu Zhang, Lili Liang and Tao Shen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(7), 3505; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18073505 - 28 Mar 2021
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 3908
Abstract
As an emerging Chinese indigenous leadership style, paradoxical leadership has received considerable attention from researchers. Many studies have demonstrated the positive impact of paradoxical leadership on employees, teams, and organizations; however, there is less information on how paradoxical leaders influence their own work [...] Read more.
As an emerging Chinese indigenous leadership style, paradoxical leadership has received considerable attention from researchers. Many studies have demonstrated the positive impact of paradoxical leadership on employees, teams, and organizations; however, there is less information on how paradoxical leaders influence their own work outcomes. On the basis of self-regulation theory, in this study, we examined the impact of paradoxical leadership on leaders’ task performance. In addition, we investigated the mediating effects of job crafting and career resilience on this relationship. Through a survey of 120 leaders and 271 of their immediate followers, our empirical analysis found the following: (1) paradoxical leadership was positively related to leaders’ task performance, (2) job crafting mediated the relationship between paradoxical leadership and leaders’ task performance, and (3) career resilience positively moderated the relationship between paradoxical leadership and job crafting, and had an indirect effect on task performance through job crafting. Our model offers novel insights into the paradoxical leadership literature and implications for improving leaders’ job crafting and task performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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23 pages, 2600 KiB  
Article
How and When Does Psychological Wellbeing Contribute to Proactive Performance? The Role of Social Resources and Job Characteristics
by Jean-Sébastien Boudrias, Francesco Montani and Christian Vandenberghe
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2492; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052492 - 03 Mar 2021
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 3459
Abstract
Are psychologically healthy employees more proactive at work? Surprisingly, responses to this question are lacking as empirical research has overlooked the wellbeing–proactive performance relationship. Drawing insights from the conservation of resources theory and the motivational fit perspective, this study proposes that leader-member exchange [...] Read more.
Are psychologically healthy employees more proactive at work? Surprisingly, responses to this question are lacking as empirical research has overlooked the wellbeing–proactive performance relationship. Drawing insights from the conservation of resources theory and the motivational fit perspective, this study proposes that leader-member exchange and team-member exchange act as social resources that convey the benefits of psychological wellbeing to subsequent proactive performance. Moreover, job complexity and task interdependence—two job characteristics that enhance the motivational potential of social resources—are expected to amplify these positive indirect relationships. Data from a three-wave, time-lagged study conducted among employees (N = 318) from French-Canadian organizations were used to test our hypothesized model. The results indicated that leader-member exchange mediated a positive relationship between wellbeing and proactive performance and that the contribution of wellbeing to proactive performance via leader-member exchange was increased when job complexity was higher. We also found a negative indirect relationship between wellbeing and proactive performance via team-member exchange when team interdependence was lower. Theoretical and practical implications of this research are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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12 pages, 1205 KiB  
Article
Perceived Environmental Dynamism Promotes Entrepreneurial Team Member’s Innovation: Explanations Based on the Uncertainty Reduction Theory
by Xiao Deng, Xi Guo, Yenchun Jim Wu and Min Chen
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(4), 2033; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18042033 - 19 Feb 2021
Cited by 64 | Viewed by 5300
Abstract
This study aims to examine the effect of perceived environmental dynamism on entrepreneurial team member’s innovation. Based on the uncertainty reduction theory, this study constructs a multilevel moderated mediation model of the relationship between perceived environmental dynamism and entrepreneurial team member’s innovation. By [...] Read more.
This study aims to examine the effect of perceived environmental dynamism on entrepreneurial team member’s innovation. Based on the uncertainty reduction theory, this study constructs a multilevel moderated mediation model of the relationship between perceived environmental dynamism and entrepreneurial team member’s innovation. By collecting questionnaires from 117 entrepreneurial team leaders and 479 team members in China, this research found that perceived environmental dynamism could stimulate entrepreneurial team members’ innovation via triggering their information exchange behavior. In addition, entrepreneurial team members’ intolerance for uncertainty and team cooperative climate can moderate the indirect positive relationship between perceived environmental dynamism and individual innovation. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of entrepreneurial team members’ responses to dynamic environment and their innovation behavior. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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10 pages, 357 KiB  
Article
Mediational Occupational Risk Factors Pertaining to Work Ability According to Age, Gender and Professional Job Type
by Inmaculada Mateo-Rodríguez, Emily Caitlin Lily Knox, Coral Oliver-Hernández, Antonio Daponte-Codina and on behalf of the esTAR Group
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(3), 877; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18030877 - 20 Jan 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 2340
Abstract
The predictive value of work ability for several health and occupational outcomes is well known. Maintaining the ability to work of all employees has become an important topic in research although some evidence suggests that some groups of workers need greater attention than [...] Read more.
The predictive value of work ability for several health and occupational outcomes is well known. Maintaining the ability to work of all employees has become an important topic in research although some evidence suggests that some groups of workers need greater attention than others. Healthcare workers (x¯ = 54.46 ± 5.64 years) attending routine occupational health checkups completed their work ability, occupational risk and sociodemographic measures. An analysis examined whether work ability differed according to gender, age and professional category. Mediation of these relationships by occupational risk variables, such as work–family conflict, was examined. Females and older adults had worse work ability than their counterparts. Professional group was not independently associated. Gender-related differences were mediated by current and historic ergonomic risk, psychosocial risk and work–family conflict. Age-related differences were mediated by violence/discrimination at work. All job risk variables, apart from current ergonomic risk, mediated associations between professional category and work ability. The present study identified the importance of risk variables for the work ability of health workers according to gender, age and professional job type. Perceptions of work–family conflict and violence–discrimination seem particularly important and should be considered when targeting improvements in work ability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
17 pages, 628 KiB  
Article
How and When Job Crafting Relates to Employee Creativity: The Important Roles of Work Engagement and Perceived Work Group Status Diversity
by Wenqing Tian, Huatian Wang and Sonja Rispens
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(1), 291; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18010291 - 02 Jan 2021
Cited by 20 | Viewed by 5851
Abstract
Creative employees are treasured assets for organizations. However, relatively little is known about what specific actions employees can take to manage their own creative process. Taking a motivational perspective, this study examined how job crafting behaviors positively link to employee creative performance through [...] Read more.
Creative employees are treasured assets for organizations. However, relatively little is known about what specific actions employees can take to manage their own creative process. Taking a motivational perspective, this study examined how job crafting behaviors positively link to employee creative performance through work engagement, and whether perceived work group status diversity moderates this relationship. We conducted a weekly diary study in which 55 employees from a Chinese energy company were asked to fill in diaries over four consecutive weeks (176 observations in total). Results of the multilevel analyses showed that weekly job crafting behaviors were positively related to weekly creative performance through increasing weekly work engagement. In contrast to our expectation, we found that weekly job crafting behaviors were more positively related to weekly creative performance when perceived work group status diversity was high. In summary, our study suggests that job crafting behaviors are effective actions employees can take to manage their creative processes through increasing work engagement. In addition, we stress that status diversity in existing work environments is an important contextual factor that shapes the job crafting process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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21 pages, 2598 KiB  
Article
Occupational Risk for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and Trauma-Related Depression: A Systematic Review with Meta-Analysis
by Gabriela Petereit-Haack, Ulrich Bolm-Audorff, Karla Romero Starke and Andreas Seidler
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(24), 9369; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17249369 - 14 Dec 2020
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 4120
Abstract
There is evidence suggesting that occupational trauma leads to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. However, there is a lack of high-quality reviews studying this association. We, therefore, conducted a systematic review with a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence of occupational trauma on [...] Read more.
There is evidence suggesting that occupational trauma leads to post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. However, there is a lack of high-quality reviews studying this association. We, therefore, conducted a systematic review with a meta-analysis to summarize the evidence of occupational trauma on PTSD and depression. After a database search on studies published between 1994 and 2018, we included 31 studies, of which only four had a low risk of bias. For soldiers exposed to wartime deployment, the pooled relative risk (RR) was 2.18 (95% CI 1.83–2.60) for PTSD and 1.15 (95% CI 1.06–1.25) for depression. For employees exposed to occupational trauma, there also was an increased risk for PTSD (RR = 3.18; 95% CI 1.76–5.76) and for depression (RR = 1.73; 95% CI 1.44–2.08). The overall quality of the evidence according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach was moderate; the evidence was high only for the association between workers after exposure to trauma and development of PTSD. The study results indicate an increased risk of PTSD and depression in soldiers after participation in war and in employees after occupational trauma. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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16 pages, 1238 KiB  
Article
Gender Diversity and Work–Life Conflict in Changing Times
by Luo Lu, Shu-Fang Kao, Ting-Ting Chang and Cary L. Cooper
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(23), 9009; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17239009 - 03 Dec 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2910
Abstract
The aim of the study is to contribute to the “well-being, diversity, equity, and inclusion” dialogue of the post-pandemic era. Specifically, we explored the joint effects of biological sex and gender diversity in self-identity on the role demands—work and family conflict relationships. To [...] Read more.
The aim of the study is to contribute to the “well-being, diversity, equity, and inclusion” dialogue of the post-pandemic era. Specifically, we explored the joint effects of biological sex and gender diversity in self-identity on the role demands—work and family conflict relationships. To advance the inclusion of scientific knowledge, the present study was conducted in the cultural context of a Chinese society. We surveyed a sample of 317 Taiwanese employees. We used structured questionnaires to collect data on biological sex, gender identity (self-endorsement on masculinity and femininity traits), work and family demands, work-to-family conflict (WFC), and family-to-work conflict (FWC). We found two sets of significant three-way interactions (sex × femininity × role demands) in predicting work and family conflict. First, for men, identifying with high femininity traits strengthened the positive relationship between work demands and FWC; for women, identifying with low femininity traits strengthened the same relationship. Second, for men, identifying with high femininity traits strengthened the relationship between family demands and WFC; for women, identifying with low femininity traits strengthened the same relationship. Our findings highlight the importance of jointly examining the biological, psychological, and social aspects of gender on the work and family interface. Contextualizing in an Eastern cultural tradition, we put the spotlight on societal pressure on people of nontraditional gender identities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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14 pages, 337 KiB  
Article
Occupational Stress and Mental Health among Anesthetists during the COVID-19 Pandemic
by Nicola Magnavita, Paolo Maurizio Soave, Walter Ricciardi and Massimo Antonelli
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8245; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218245 - 08 Nov 2020
Cited by 100 | Viewed by 7198
Abstract
Anesthetist-intensivists who treat patients with coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) are exposed to significant biological and psychosocial risks. Our study investigated the occupational and health conditions of anesthesiologists in a COVID-19 hub hospital in Latium, Italy. Ninety out of a total of 155 eligible [...] Read more.
Anesthetist-intensivists who treat patients with coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) are exposed to significant biological and psychosocial risks. Our study investigated the occupational and health conditions of anesthesiologists in a COVID-19 hub hospital in Latium, Italy. Ninety out of a total of 155 eligible workers (59%; male 48%) participated in the cross-sectional survey. Occupational stress was assessed with the Effort Reward Imbalance (ERI) questionnaire, organizational justice with the Colquitt Scale, insomnia with the Sleep Condition Indicator (SCI), and mental health with the Goldberg Anxiety and Depression Scale (GADS). A considerable percentage of workers (71.1%) reported high work-related stress, with an imbalance between high effort and low rewards. The level of perceived organizational justice was modest. Physical activity and meditation—the behaviors most commonly adopted to increase resilience—decreased. Workers also reported insomnia (36.7%), anxiety (27.8%), and depression (51.1%). The effort made for work was significantly correlated with the presence of depressive symptoms (r = 0.396). Anesthetists need to be in good health in order to ensure optimal care for COVID-19 patients. Their state of health can be improved by providing an increase in individual resources with interventions for better work organization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
11 pages, 689 KiB  
Article
Mindfulness and Psychological Distress in Kindergarten Teachers: The Mediating Role of Emotional Intelligence
by Xiulan Cheng, Ying Ma, Jiaqi Li, Yonghui Cai, Ling Li and Jiao Zhang
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8212; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218212 - 06 Nov 2020
Cited by 18 | Viewed by 3604
Abstract
Kindergarten teachers are often exposed to great stress. Considering that, mindfulness has been demonstrated to act as a critical role in the psychological well-being of kindergarten teachers. The present study assessed mindfulness in teaching (MT), psychological distress and emotional intelligence (EI) among 511 [...] Read more.
Kindergarten teachers are often exposed to great stress. Considering that, mindfulness has been demonstrated to act as a critical role in the psychological well-being of kindergarten teachers. The present study assessed mindfulness in teaching (MT), psychological distress and emotional intelligence (EI) among 511 kindergarten teachers in mainland China and investigated the mediating role of EI to explore the association mechanism between kindergarten teachers’ MT and psychological distress. The major results suggested that kindergarten teachers’ MT was negatively related to their psychological distress (depression, anxiety, and stress). Results of path analyses indicated that the total score of EI and dimension of regulation of emotion (ROE) could serve as significant mediators. The findings suggest that mindfulness might be beneficial to relieve kindergarten teachers’ psychological distress through the mediating role of EI. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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17 pages, 399 KiB  
Article
Validation of the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory with Coronary Artery Disease Patients
by Julija Gecaite-Stonciene, Adomas Bunevicius, Julius Burkauskas, Julija Brozaitiene, Julius Neverauskas, Narseta Mickuviene and Nijole Kazukauskiene
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2020, 17(21), 8003; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph17218003 - 30 Oct 2020
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 2991
Abstract
Background: Fatigue is a common distressing symptom in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) is used for measuring fatigue in various clinical settings. Nevertheless, its multidimensional structure has not been consistent across studies. Thus, we aimed to psychometrically [...] Read more.
Background: Fatigue is a common distressing symptom in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI) is used for measuring fatigue in various clinical settings. Nevertheless, its multidimensional structure has not been consistent across studies. Thus, we aimed to psychometrically evaluate the MFI in patients with CAD. Methods: In sum, 1162 CAD patients completed questionnaires assessing their subjective fatigue level (MFI-20), mental distress symptoms (HADS, STAI), and health-related quality of life (SF-36). Participants also completed exercise capacity (EC) testing. Results: Confirmatory factor analysis of the four-factor model, showed acceptable fit (CFI = 0.905; GFI = 0.895; NFI = 0.893, RMSEA = 0.077). After eliminating four items, confirmatory factor analysis testing showed improvement in the four-factor model of the MFI-16 (CFI = 0.910; GFI = 0.909; NFI = 0.898, RMSEA = 0.077). Internal consistency values were adequate for the total score and four MFI-16 subscales: General fatigue, physical fatigue, reduced activity, and mental fatigue with Cronbach’s α range: 0.60–0.82. The inadequate value (Cronbach’s α = 0.43) was received for the subscale of reduced motivation in both MFI-20 and MFI-16. Correlations between the MFI-16 and HADS, STAI, SF-36, and EC measures were statistically significant (all p’s < 0.001). Conclusions: The Lithuanian version of the modified MFI of 16 items showed good factorial structure and satisfactory psychometric characteristics, except for reduced motivation subscale. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)

Review

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25 pages, 890 KiB  
Review
Resilience, Coping Strategies and Posttraumatic Growth in the Workplace Following COVID-19: A Narrative Review on the Positive Aspects of Trauma
by Georgia Libera Finstad, Gabriele Giorgi, Lucrezia Ginevra Lulli, Caterina Pandolfi, Giulia Foti, José M. León-Perez, Francisco J. Cantero-Sánchez and Nicola Mucci
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(18), 9453; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18189453 - 08 Sep 2021
Cited by 131 | Viewed by 17429
Abstract
The COVID-19 pandemic represents a traumatic event that has profoundly changed working conditions with detrimental consequences for workers’ health, in particular for the healthcare population directly involved in addressing the emergency. Nevertheless, previous research has demonstrated that traumatic experiences can also lead to [...] Read more.
The COVID-19 pandemic represents a traumatic event that has profoundly changed working conditions with detrimental consequences for workers’ health, in particular for the healthcare population directly involved in addressing the emergency. Nevertheless, previous research has demonstrated that traumatic experiences can also lead to positive reactions, stimulating resilience and feelings of growth. The aim of this narrative review is to investigate the positive aspects associated with the COVID-19 pandemic and the possible health prevention and promotion strategies by analyzing the available scientific evidence. In particular, we focus on the constructs of resilience, coping strategies and posttraumatic growth (PTG). A literature search was performed on the PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, Google Scholar and Psycinfo databases. Forty-six articles were included in the literature synthesis. Psychological resilience is a fundamental variable for reducing and preventing the negative psychological effects of the pandemic and is associated with lower levels of depression, anxiety and burnout. At the individual and organizational level, resilience plays a crucial role in enhancing wellbeing in healthcare and non-healthcare workers. Connected to resilience, adaptive coping strategies are essential for managing the emergency and work-related stress. Several positive factors influencing resilience have been highlighted in the development of PTG. At the same time, high levels of resilience and positive coping strategies can enhance personal growth. Considering the possible long-term coexistence and consequences of COVID-19, organizational interventions should aim to improve workers’ adaptive coping skills, resilience and PTG in order to promote wellbeing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Emerging Issues in Occupational Health Psychology)
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