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2nd Edition: Zoonoses Associated with Human–Animal Relationship: Risks, Prevention, and Defence

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2023) | Viewed by 2121

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Veterinary Medicine and Animal Production, Federico II University of Naples, 80137 Naples, Italy
Interests: zoonoses and public health; microbiology; animal assisted interventions; avian pathology; zoonotic risks; songbirds, rabbit and poultry
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Guest Editor
Department of Translational Medical Sciences, University of Naples Federico II, 80138 Naples, Italy
Interests: metabolism; human health; basic science; environmental pollutants; endocrine disruptor chemicals

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Guest Editor
Medical School and School of Public Health, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455, USA
Interests: public health; cancer disparities; determinants of health in oncology; tobacco use and cancer implications; animal assisted interventions; One Health

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent decades, we have witnessed a noticeable and evident change in human–animal relationships. We have gone from a utilitarian vision of this relationship to a more respectful vision of otherness and animal welfare. Consequently, the way of relating to and contacting animals has also changed which, particularly for pets, provides for a closer and often symbiotic coexistence. Furthermore, some animal species, such as dogs, are involved in activities that are now considered “working”, and involve a very close coexistence between owner and animal.

However, the zoonotic risks derived from these close human–animal interactions, which constitute the rules of interacting and living with animals (pets in particular), are still little explored, and are underestimated. This Special Issue will address this gap.

Papers highlighting any aspect of infectious (bacterial, viral, or parasitic) zoonoses in this field are welcome and will be taken into consideration for the publication. We encourage authors of research or review articles to submit their material to this Special Issue. Papers will be peer-reviewed according to the journal’s criteria and accepted papers will be published in IJERPH as soon as practicable. All the papers will also be listed together as a Special Issue.

Dr. Antonio Santaniello
Dr. Francesco Oriente
Dr. Crina Cotoc
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • zoonoses
  • human–animal relationship
  • health monitoring
  • laboratory diagnosis
  • animal-assisted interventions
  • public health
  • One Health

Related Special Issue

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

10 pages, 3076 KiB  
Review
Association between Toxoplasma gondii Infection and Type-1 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
by Ashley Catchpole, Brinley N. Zabriskie, Pierce Bassett, Bradley Embley, David White, Shawn D. Gale and Dawson Hedges
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4436; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054436 - 02 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1764
Abstract
Type-1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease characterized by damage to pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells, is associated with adverse renal, retinal, cardiovascular, and cognitive outcomes, possibly including dementia. Moreover, the protozoal parasite Toxoplasma gondii has been associated with type-1 diabetes. To better characterize the association [...] Read more.
Type-1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease characterized by damage to pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells, is associated with adverse renal, retinal, cardiovascular, and cognitive outcomes, possibly including dementia. Moreover, the protozoal parasite Toxoplasma gondii has been associated with type-1 diabetes. To better characterize the association between type-1 diabetes and Toxoplasma gondii infection, we conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies that evaluated the relationship between type-1 diabetes and Toxoplasma gondii infection. A random-effects model based on nine primary studies (total number of participants = 2655) that met our inclusion criteria demonstrated a pooled odds ratio of 2.45 (95% confidence interval, 0.91–6.61). Removing one outlying study increased the pooled odds ratio to 3.38 (95% confidence interval, 2.09–5.48). These findings suggest that Toxoplasma gondii infection might be positively associated with type-1 diabetes, although more research is needed to better characterize this association. Additional research is required to determine whether changes in immune function due to type-1 diabetes increase the risk of infection with Toxoplasma gondii, infection with Toxoplasma gondii increases the risk of type-1 diabetes, or both processes occur. Full article
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