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Human Mpox—an Emerging Zoonotic Disease and a Global Threat

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Diseases, Chronic Diseases, and Disease Prevention".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 1795

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Instituto de Saúde Ambiental (ISAMB), Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-028 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: infectious diseases; HIV; hepatitis; tropical medicine
1. Emergency Response and Biopreparedness Unit, Department of Infectious Diseases, Instituto Nacional de Saúde Doutor Ricardo Jorge (INSA), 1649-016 Lisboa, Portugal
2. Instituto de Saúde Ambiental (ISAMB), Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Lisboa, 1649-028 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: biopreparedness; public health; one health; biosafety & biosecurity; emerging and reemerging infectious diseases; highly pathogenic agents

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ongoing mpox outbreak in non-endemic countries is likely to be a consequence of the failure to limit the spread of the disease in endemic regions of Africa, despite decades of constant outbreaks. Moreover, it should also serve as a reminder that in a globalized world, no region or country is safe from zoonotic pathogens like monkeypox virus unless the virus is contained in endemic regions.

A globally driven one-health response strategy is essential to control present and future outbreaks, since research into mpox has been neglected and underfunded. Capacity and competencies must be also built, to predict new outbreaks and prevent them rather than just responding to and containing them.

To date, the current spread has disproportionately affected men who have sex with men. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the virus has circulated undetected for some time outside areas where it has been endemic, possibly masquerading as other sexually transmitted infections. Genome data also inform about the virus evolutionary trajectory, genetic diversity and phenotypic characteristics with relevance for guiding diagnostics, prophylaxis and research.

As a global public health issue, this outbreak raises an alarm about the changing epidemiology of the disease, which warrants stringent epidemiological surveillance to prevent further escalation of the current outbreak in non-endemic countries.

This Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (IJERPH) focuses on the current outbreak and seeks to publish papers on all aspects of monkeypox virus.

Prof. Dr. Francisco José Nunes Antunes
Guest Editor
Rita Cordeiro
Co-Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • mpox
  • outbreak
  • zoonotic disease
  • global
  • risk behaviors
  • human-to-human transmission
  • epidemiology
  • diagnosis
  • phylogenetics
 

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

9 pages, 332 KiB  
Article
Demographic and Clinical Characteristics of Mpox Patients Attending an STD Clinic in Lisbon
by Margarida Brito Caldeira, José Miguel Neves, Mafalda Pestana, Rita Corte-Real, Maria José Borrego, Rita Cordeiro, Jorge Machado, Ana Pelerito, Isabel Lopes De Carvalho, Maria Sofia Núncio and Cândida Fernandes
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(19), 6803; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20196803 - 22 Sep 2023
Viewed by 1187
Abstract
Mpox is a viral disease caused by the monkeypox virus, which marked the year of 2022 with a global outbreak. While previously considered to be a zoonosis of almost exclusive animal-to-human transmission, the current outbreak has been attributed to human-to-human transmission, particularly sexual [...] Read more.
Mpox is a viral disease caused by the monkeypox virus, which marked the year of 2022 with a global outbreak. While previously considered to be a zoonosis of almost exclusive animal-to-human transmission, the current outbreak has been attributed to human-to-human transmission, particularly sexual transmission. As a new sexually transmissible disease, we studied the epidemiological and clinical features, as well as the concomitant occurrence of other sexually transmissible diseases, treatment approach, and outcome of our 291 patients, in the current outbreak. We found a total of 169 concomitant sexually transmissible infections of bacterial and viral origins, corresponding to 107 patients. Neisseria gonorrhoeae was the most common agent, particularly in the anal location. With this work, we emphasize the need for a thorough epidemiological and medical history, as well as a concomitant complete laboratorial screening for other STIs in patients with confirmed or suspected mpox. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Human Mpox—an Emerging Zoonotic Disease and a Global Threat)
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