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HFE for Eliminating Avoidable Harm in Health Care

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Global Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2022) | Viewed by 13596

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Graduate Institute of Business and Management, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan 33302, Taiwan
Interests: ergonomics; anthropometry; medical product development; patient safety; assistant device design

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human factors and ergonomics (HFE) is the scientific discipline concerned with the understanding of interactions among humans and other elements of a system, and the profession that applies theory, principles, data, and methods to design in order to optimize human well-being and overall system performance.

According to the visions and missions of World Alliance for Patient Safety (2004–2014), WHO Patient Safety Initiatives (2015–2020), and Global Patient Safety Action Plan 2021–2030, this Special Issue aims to explore the relationship between HFE and patient safety, in order to drive forward strategies and actions based on science, patient experience, system design, and partnerships; to eliminate all sources of avoidable risk and harm to patients and health workers, and to ensure the maximum possible reduction in avoidable harm due to unsafe health care.

Potential topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Engaging patients and families as partners in safe care;
  • Achieving results through collaborative working;
  • Analyzing and sharing data to generate learning;
  • Translating evidence into actionable and measurable improvement;
  • Base policies and action on the nature of the care setting;
  • Using both scientific expertise and patient experience to improve safety;
  • Instilling a safety culture in the design and delivery of health care.

Prof. Dr. Wen-Ko Chiou
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 5779 KiB  
Article
Creating a Healthy Life for the Elderly through Participation in Self-Media: A Study on the Demands of the Elderly in Self-Media
by Yo-Wen Liang, Jeng Wang, Shu-Ping Yu, Jin-Kwan Lin and Allan Chung
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(19), 12774; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph191912774 - 6 Oct 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2007
Abstract
In recent years, with the trends in digital media and a shift in the sources of information, self-media has gradually become a unique new type of media with considerable potential. Numerous related studies have also indicated that participating in self-media positively impacts the [...] Read more.
In recent years, with the trends in digital media and a shift in the sources of information, self-media has gradually become a unique new type of media with considerable potential. Numerous related studies have also indicated that participating in self-media positively impacts the elderly, especially in self-media regarding healthcare and welfare. However, research has seldom explored the demands and services for elderly participation in self-media. In this study, the research targets were 55–75 years of age, in good health, with a monthly disposable income of more than TWD 30,000 (N = 180). The research methods had two aims: (1) to analyze the current well-known self-media and websites related to healthcare; and (2) via the Kano Model questionnaire, to survey and explore the demand for self-media among the elderly. The results summarize and describe the preferred layout, content items, interaction methods, and information display of self-media content for the elderly. We anticipate designing a self-media website platform that meets the demands of the elderly and that continues to develop into social media platforms and audio-visual content in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HFE for Eliminating Avoidable Harm in Health Care)
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10 pages, 1587 KiB  
Article
Prompts for the Future to Live Healthier: A Study of Cognition and Motivation for Healthy Behaviors
by Chung-Chih Lin, Pang-Hsiang Yu and Jin-Kwan Lin
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(11), 6682; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19116682 - 30 May 2022
Viewed by 1574
Abstract
“Aging” is a continuous phenomenon. Medically speaking, physical decline starts after the age of 25. Generally, people do not sense such a decline at a young age, but most transition to some awareness by the age of 50. To enhance the physical and [...] Read more.
“Aging” is a continuous phenomenon. Medically speaking, physical decline starts after the age of 25. Generally, people do not sense such a decline at a young age, but most transition to some awareness by the age of 50. To enhance the physical and mental health of elderly people and to reduce the length of time spent bedridden, the thoughts and behaviors regarding health and health care among a target group aged between 55 and 75 years were investigated in this study based on the perspective of health beliefs. A total of 300 survey questionnaires were issued and all were returned. The results indicated that after the respondents were reminded of the unhealthy implications of bedridden time, they were willing to enhance their health-promoting behaviors in their diets and regular routines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HFE for Eliminating Avoidable Harm in Health Care)
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15 pages, 1388 KiB  
Article
Effects of Mindfulness Meditation on Doctors’ Mindfulness, Patient Safety Culture, Patient Safety Competency and Adverse Event
by Chao Liu, Hao Chen, Xinyi Cao, Yini Sun, Chia-Yih Liu, Kan Wu, Yu-Chao Liang, Szu-Erh Hsu, Ding-Hau Huang and Wen-Ko Chiou
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(6), 3282; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19063282 - 10 Mar 2022
Cited by 19 | Viewed by 6323
Abstract
Objective: This study investigated the effects of mindfulness meditation on doctors’ mindfulness, patient safety culture, patient safety competency, and adverse events. Methods: We recruited 91 doctors from a hospital in China and randomized them to mindfulness meditation group (n = 46) and [...] Read more.
Objective: This study investigated the effects of mindfulness meditation on doctors’ mindfulness, patient safety culture, patient safety competency, and adverse events. Methods: We recruited 91 doctors from a hospital in China and randomized them to mindfulness meditation group (n = 46) and a waiting control group (n = 45). The mindfulness meditation group underwent an 8-week mindfulness meditation intervention, while the control group underwent no intervention. We measured four main variables (mindfulness, patient safety culture, patient safety competency, and adverse event) before and after the mindfulness meditation intervention. Results: In the experimental group, mindfulness, patient safety culture and patient safety competency were significantly higher compared with those of the control group. In the control group, there were no significant differences in any of the three variables between the pre-test and post-test. Adverse events in the experimental group were significantly lower than in the control group. Conclusions: The intervention of mindfulness meditation significantly improved the level of mindfulness, patient safety culture and patient safety competency. During the mindfulness meditation intervention, the rate of adverse events in the meditation group was also significantly lower than in the control group. As a simple and effective intervention, mindfulness meditation plays a positive role in improving patient safety and has certain promotional value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HFE for Eliminating Avoidable Harm in Health Care)
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16 pages, 860 KiB  
Article
Environmental Barriers and Functional Outcomes in Patients with Schizophrenia in Taiwan: The Capacity-Performance Discrepancy
by Wei-Chih Lien, Wei-Ming Wang, Hui-Min David Wang, Feng-Huei Lin and Fen-Zhi Yao
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2022, 19(1), 315; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph19010315 - 28 Dec 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2163
Abstract
Environmental factors are crucial determinants of disability in schizophrenic patients. Using data from the 2014–2018 Certification of Disability and Care Needs dataset, we identified 3882 adult patients (46.78% females; age, 51.01 ± 13.9 years) with schizophrenia. We found that patients with severe schizophrenia [...] Read more.
Environmental factors are crucial determinants of disability in schizophrenic patients. Using data from the 2014–2018 Certification of Disability and Care Needs dataset, we identified 3882 adult patients (46.78% females; age, 51.01 ± 13.9 years) with schizophrenia. We found that patients with severe schizophrenia had lower capacity and performance than those with moderate schizophrenia. The chances of having an access barrier to environmental chapter 1 (e1) products and technology in moderate schizophrenic patients and in severe schizophrenic patients were 29.5% and 37.8%, respectively. Logistic regression analyses demonstrated that the performance score was related to accessibility barriers in the categories described in e1, with adequate fitness of models in category e110 for personal consumption, e115 for personal usage in daily living activities, and e120 for personal outdoor and indoor mobility and transportation. Furthermore, the capacity-performance discrepancy was higher in moderate schizophrenic patients with accessibility barriers in the e110, e115, and e120 categories than that in moderate schizophrenic patients without accessibility barriers. However, severe schizophrenic patients with category e120 accessibility barriers were prone to a lower discrepancy, with institutional care a potentially decreasing factor. In conclusion, providing an e1 barrier-free environment is necessary for patients with schizophrenia to decrease their disability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue HFE for Eliminating Avoidable Harm in Health Care)
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